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Franz Bieberkopf
Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 30, 2014 at 3:40:03 pm
Last Edited By Franz Bieberkopf on Aug 30, 2014 at 3:40:19 pm

Mark Gurman writes a broad and interesting review of the ideology and approach Apple uses in "shaping and controlling the discussion of its products".

"Nothing is left to chance, and in the rare case where Apple doesn’t control the initial message, it remedies that by using proxies to deliver carefully crafted, off-the-record responses. ... Apple’s “tell them what to believe” PR strategy has worked incredibly well for years. But it has also created tensions between the company and the people who cover it, as well as within Apple itself."


http://9to5mac.com/2014/08/29/seeing-through-the-illusion-understanding-app...

Franz.


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Charlie Austin
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 30, 2014 at 4:40:24 pm

[Franz Bieberkopf] "... "shaping and controlling the discussion of its products"."

Interesting read. The quote above is pretty much a textbook definition of marketing. Most companies wish they were as good at it as Apple. :-)

-------------------------------------------------------------

~ My FCPX Babbling blog ~
~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~
~"The function you just attempted is not yet implemented"~


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Bill Davis
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 30, 2014 at 5:46:07 pm

If any of this surprises anyone, THAT should be the surprise. Apple is a business. As such, it's primary mission is to do anything and everything to encourage and protect the success of that business.
I've brushed up against the described PR "manipulation" in the past personally. And coming away from the experience, my gut told me that while sure I was being manipulated - I wasn't being manipulated towards a falsehood, but rather towards something real that I just didn't fully understand. And over time, that's how it's played out. At the Apple launch of FCP X, sure the PR team wanted the message that X was the heir to Legacy rather than just iMovie Pro. And here we are, years later, and that initial "spin" mirrors reality pretty well, IMO. IF Apple had left X as a "prosumer" app - and we didn't have Multicam and Libraries and even the database approach (which honestly, very few consumers have any use for) then the "it's all cynical manipulation, pure and simple" charge might have legs. But that's not what evolved. What Apple delivered was precisely what they promised. A wholesale re-thinking of a professional editing platform for the changing landscape of an evolving industry. At some point during a product intro or corporate press release, you get to the "I buy into this thinking or not" point. I did, not because of the way the story was being spun, but rather because the story being told but the PR team made fundamental sense. And I think it still does.
FWIW.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 30, 2014 at 7:33:45 pm

[Bill Davis] "If any of this surprises anyone, THAT should be the surprise."


Bill,

I'm not sure where you were set up for "surprises" (I introduced it as "broad" and "interesting") but maybe you knew it all before reading.

Since you've raised the issue, here's some of the things I found surprising (or didn't know):

- "There are only around over [sic] 30 PR employees in Apple’s Cupertino offices, with another few dozen-some individuals scattered around the world …"

- "Inside the [Product Marketing building] are the following separate teams of employees: Momentum, Mac, Corporate Communications, iPhone, iPad, iTunes, and Events. …. The Mac team is led by longtime PR executive Bill Evans, and is one of the larger PR groups. Mac covers all Mac hardware and software including OS X, consumer Mac apps, and professional apps. […] and Bill Evans works with Senior VP of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller."

- "When Steve Jobs was at the helm, the buck stopped at his office for even the smallest PR minutiae."

- "There was an “exodus” in Apple PR after Jobs died in late-2011, explained multiple current and former Apple employees, mirroring departures that made bigger headlines in other departments. … When Tim Cook officially took the reins at Apple in late 2011, “he started informing the PR group that Apple needs to become a friendlier company.”"

- "While Apple still works with external agency Media Arts Lab of TBWA on print, digital, and TV marketing efforts, … Apple is “aggressively” poaching select members of Media Arts Lab for its in-house team, but not undertaking a full-on corporate raid."

- "Over the years, Apple has expanded early product review opportunities to technology websites. … Just as the chart shows Apple expanding review hardware access, it also shows Apple subsequently taking away access. [...] Macworld ... has not received early hardware since the launch of the first Retina iPad. Speculation suggests that less than entirely positive interactions between the publications and Apple’s PR team led to the loss of early product access."

Franz.


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Tim Wilson
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 30, 2014 at 9:49:34 pm

[Franz Bieberkopf] "Since you've raised the issue, here's some of the things I found surprising (or didn't know):
"


Saying that "Apple is a business" implies that all businesses do it this way, or all successful business do it this way, or all businesses should do it this way...or something similar....

...none of which is true. None. There are as many different approaches as there are businesses. Apple has been typically described as closed, verging on hostile. Hearing specifics of Tim Cook's view of such things -- that that HAD been the case, and is increasingly no longer the case -- is the definition of news.

Learning how much of their PR is handled in-house, I was also struck by how small their PR team is. That TC took a machete to that group is, once again, the definition of news.

Of course, another definition of "news" is that somebody knew this, because it actually happened -- but I've certainly not seen it mentioned here, or anywhere else on the web.

So please, no poo-pooing this as non-news without discussing what of this has been previously reported, and not just surmised. I see a bunch in this article that not only flies in the face of previous assumptions, but also provides details that I sincerely doubt have ever been published before. I invite anyone to please point to specifics where this isn't the case.

I think this article is a big deal: an unprecedented look at one of the most distinctively characteristic dynamics within an uncharacteristically distinctive organization.

I know that facts are considered to have virtually no value these days, especially with regards to news. But I'd like to think that actual newsgathering could still be acknowledged as such, and not dismissed without an equivalent amount of actual research, and a relevant weight of actual facts to the contrary.

Not that any of it intended to change anything you do with regards to Apple in your life, or how you feel about it. Maybe it's my bizarre and increasingly out of step attachment to facts, but I think there's value to knowledge for its own sake, apart from actions or feelings. I like knowing stuff, and I learned some stuff from this.


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Bill Davis
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 30, 2014 at 9:58:00 pm
Last Edited By Bill Davis on Aug 30, 2014 at 9:59:55 pm

Perhaps it's because I've spent a large part of my career in corporate video working often with senior executives. But the stuff you called out is precisely what I would have expected.

Corporate cultures are very real. And EVERYTHING a corporation does is typically a reflection of that culture.

I learned that very early in my career where I was doing a video project for a huge beef and pork products supplier with international operations. They had a script that included some scenes where outhouses were knocked over revealing employees in their skivvies. I questioned the "tastefulness" of the approach. And the response from the company guys was "Bill, you've got to understand that our audience is guys who stand in the line and kill cows all day long. Trust me, they'll think it's hilarious."

And they were right and I was wrong. (even tho I determined soon after that this particular client wasn't a good fit for me and I only did the one project with them)

Corporate culture is a big deal. Apple's is extremely effective. And as the article points out - it's often a very serious reflection of the personalities of the folks at the very top.

I guess I shouldn't be surprised that those who haven't spent much time in the corporate corridors might be surprised. But those of us who have, honestly probably aren't.

FWIW.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 31, 2014 at 12:35:42 am

[Bill Davis] "... the stuff you called out is precisely what I would have expected."

Bill,

30 people seems tiny to me; what is it about Apple lead you to expect such a small cohort?

What is it about Jobs gave you insight into "Momentum" as one of 8 teams? You didn't expect other areas of focus?

What is it about Tim Cook made you know he'd be poaching PR people where Jobs didn't?

I don't read Macworld much, but did you expect they'd been cut off from preview units?


Franz.


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Bill Davis
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 31, 2014 at 5:40:52 pm
Last Edited By Bill Davis on Aug 31, 2014 at 5:45:13 pm

[Franz Bieberkopf] "30 people seems tiny to me; what is it about Apple lead you to expect such a small cohort?

What is it about Jobs gave you insight into "Momentum" as one of 8 teams? You didn't expect other areas of focus?

What is it about Tim Cook made you know he'd be poaching PR people where Jobs didn't?

I don't read Macworld much, but did you expect they'd been cut off from preview units?"


In order,

it's 30 in Cupertino for corporate stuff. I'd expect PR Operations also happen in the hundreds of other operations they maintain worldwide. Small teams are the rule rather than the exception in corporate thinking those days. In every large corporate institution I've dealt with in the past decade, head counts at the corporate office level are WAY down. It was extremely typical for a 5 person team to be cut to 2 or 3 during the recession, and for that team to STILL be operating with it's reduced head count today.


B - I have no special insight about Jobs or Momentum. But it makes strategic sense to leverage the effectiveness of fewer bodies into larger results with the "surrogates" tactics. And from what I witnessed in the general corporate world, "focus" has two wildly different effectivenesses in PR. There's the strategic PR focus over which you have just vague control. And then there are the times when the plan gets totally derailed by breaking events and you have to react to external forces. That's when the stuff like message discipline comes into play. That's part of the reason people say Apple isn't as "transparent" as they'd like. That and the Sarbanes stuff where release of strategic information can get you slapped for being inappropriately "forward looking" and get the SEC up in your grill. IMO It's complicated.

C - that stuff is "team building" 101. It's the holy grail of the executive suite. With Apple's resources, size and clout, there's not a huge pool of executive talent that can take those slots. So "poaching" is the coin of the realm. It's supposed to be done in a civilized manner, but honestly, in assessing a company's viability as to future earnings - it's not the products or even always the current sales that count. It's the PEOPLE you have in place. Confidence in the team - from both inside and outside the company - is the single largest value a company carries. Honestly, as miraculous as Mr. Jobs was as a visionary. Mr Cook, in keeping Apple not just operating, but excelling in the post Jobs era is nothing short of astonishing. Talk about insane expectations. How many people could have filled those shoes? Team Building. It's a BIG deal.

D - To answer the MacWorld Magazine question, absolutely. As a guy who spent 10 years writing a magazine column, I watched through the 90s as all the magazine column lengths went from 1500 words, down to an average of 900 words over the decade, and as the magazine went from thick and hefty to sometimes not much larger than a robust sales flyer. Look where the article says the focus (and press credentials) was shifted. Blogs, AnandTech on the rise and traditional print magazines on the decline.
That's just a no-brainer. IMO.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 31, 2014 at 6:19:20 pm

[Bill Davis] "In order, ..."


Bill,

Likewise ...

[Bill Davis] "A - It's 30 in Cupertino for corporate stuff. I'd expect PR Operations also happen in the hundreds of other operations they maintain worldwide."

You would expect so. it would therefor be surprising to find that it isn't hundreds. (Unless you're referring to "operations" as events and such and not staff.)

[Bill Davis] " I have no special insight about Jobs or Momentum. But it makes strategic sense"

What I found interesting was the specifics (i.e. what the 8 groups are and who does what) - not the generalities of strategy (about which we know little beyond this article). While you may have know what Bill Evans does, and that he was paired so closely with Phil Schiller, I'm not sure why you would expect "anyone" to know that.

[Bill Davis] "C - that stuff is "team building" 101."

I'm not sure of your definition of "team building" here - I think you mean hiring? (That is not common usage.) Anyway, I'm not sure what it is about your understand of Cook vs. Jobs that lead you to expect one would bring the operations in house where the other wouldn't, and one would poach PR talent where the other wouldn't. This is quite aside from the question of the identification of the PR firm (which I guess you knew before as well?)

[Bill Davis] "D - To answer the MacWorld Magazine question, absolutely."

You've outlined that you understand the reasons Apple expanded their relationships (with blogs etc.). It doesn't necessarily follow that you would expect magazines to be cut off. And certainly most readers would be surprised that Macworld is cut off from preview hardware - why do you think no one would be surprised by that?

I think in general there is a lot of unknown, if not surprising, information and insight in the article.

... or, as Tim put it:

[Tim Wilson] "I think this article is a big deal: an unprecedented look at one of the most distinctively characteristic dynamics within an uncharacteristically distinctive organization. [...] So please, no poo-pooing this as non-news without discussing what of this has been previously reported, and not just surmised. I see a bunch in this article that not only flies in the face of previous assumptions, but also provides details that I sincerely doubt have ever been published before. I invite anyone to please point to specifics where this isn't the case."


Franz.


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Bill Davis
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 31, 2014 at 8:22:55 pm

My only response - and this is for both Franz and to our gracious host Tim - this all strikes me as about as "inside baseball" as it's possible to get.

I agree it's news, I'm just not sure how important. It's clearly fascinating for those who feel it's useful to have some enhanced ability to parse the PR statements to know which players on the PR team are "paired" with which executives. But in the greater scheme of things, I'm not sure it really means much of anything.

The original article was a nice piece of reporting and writing, but does it change anything?

Perhaps we're moving into an era where the bubblegum card packets will arrive for the computer software teams - instead of the sports teams.

Will there will be pros who track the "earned media stats" of the PR teams across companies?

Cue Brian Williams:
"In tech news today, Intel released Bob Smith, the assistant product manager for CPU software and picked up two materials engineers and an unnamed MBA. The Division manager praised Mr. Smith as a seasoned PR pro, but the team felt he lacked depth in Social Media and Mobile Devices."

And how do you score that in your "fantasy league" corporate rosters?

My kid introduced me to an acronym when he was about 7 and I tended to over-explain things to him.

He'd hold up his hand and say "MITIN" (pronounced like the wooly glove) - meaning "More Information Than I Need."

I suspect that while this is certainly "news" - perhaps even to be seen quite fairly as Cow Forum Important News - I'm still not sure that it's "actionable" news.

Then again, I've been wrong before and If I'm wrong about this - and we DO see those bubblegum cards in the future, I'll be OK with it.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Aindreas Gallagher
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 30, 2014 at 10:04:33 pm
Last Edited By Aindreas Gallagher on Aug 30, 2014 at 10:14:46 pm

[Bill Davis] "At the Apple launch of FCP X, sure the PR team wanted the message that X was the heir to Legacy rather than just iMovie Pro. "

surely isn't the point that apple finally decided to do exactly what they intellectually wanted to do in media editing and organisation. They seem to have had a tendency towards globally altering basic computing reality lately.

any spin they're doing is to present the validity of their argument. that's fine - but all that said, and granted X is complex use case software - but if iOS demonstrated the periodical and sustained bugs X presents, half the monied west would be losing their minds.

as in I'm thinking 'keep the inspector closed there for god's sake' is the equivalent of being asked not to open iOS settings while you're in itunes on your iphone.

that's not really likely to happen and you'd think iOS is pretty complex itself. And in this thought experiment - apple haven't even formally said there was a problem performing that action.

there seem to be sustained habitual frailties in X that persists from release to release. PR and all aside - apple seem quite OK with it occasionally hobbling along - as it did with major plugins like bullet for a period of months.

you'd think their best PR has an easy game with what are somewhat surreally perfect products. the iPhone might as well be a 21C wheel pulled out of the ground. my only gripe left is that I can't kick it unharmed into the trees.

still: what's the deal with that inspector issue?

*edit* i haven't even read the article yet. jesus that's gigantic.

http://vimeo.com/user1590967/videos http://www.ogallchoir.net promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics


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David Lawrence
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 31, 2014 at 4:04:27 am

[Aindreas Gallagher] "there seem to be sustained habitual frailties in X that persists from release to release. PR and all aside - apple seem quite OK with it occasionally hobbling along - as it did with major plugins like bullet for a period of months."

Given the surprising (to me at least) news that Apple's in-house PR is only 30 people, how many people do you think Apple has working on specialty software that accounts for less than 1% of their yearly revenue? It's no surprise fixes to X happen at the current pace. I'm actually impressed with their progress all things considered.

_______________________
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Aindreas Gallagher
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 1, 2014 at 10:29:14 pm

[David Lawrence] "I'm actually impressed with their progress all things considered."

I guess? although that period where major red.g etc plugs died for months on end does stick in the mind.
How has it been logging? if you're not making monster timelines do you like the performance?

The group table video with the hollywood guy off the will smith film was funny - given the other guy sitting there from fcpxworks was fresh off the fcpx team - everyone kept asking about masterclip audio plugin drop to roles to effect some kind of bussing, and also nearly begging to widen the audio meter guis?
It's hard to get a sense if apple are going to do any of that. fcpxworks guy kept hinting at the alex4d private calls list in x in general.
but you'd think he would do that.

http://vimeo.com/user1590967/videos http://www.ogallchoir.net promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 1, 2014 at 10:47:53 pm

[David Lawrence] "how many people do you think Apple has working on specialty software that accounts for less than 1% of their yearly revenue?"

[Aindreas Gallagher] "It's hard to get a sense if apple are going to do any of that."


Another (so far unmentioned) implication from my post the other week is the drop in revenue from Final Cut Pro.

The implications of that graph are a revenue of probably a couple hundred million dollars per year in 2010 for FCP7, and something like sixty million in 2013 for FCPX.

Then measure that against the development evident in the FCP6-7 upgrade.


Franz.


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Charlie Austin
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 1, 2014 at 11:13:21 pm

[Franz Bieberkopf] "a couple hundred million dollars per year in 2010 for FCP7, and something like sixty million in 2013 for FCPX."

Not that it matters, but add in Compressor, Motion, and maybe Logic to that FCP X total. Rcp 7 wasn't sold alone.

-------------------------------------------------------------

~ My FCPX Babbling blog ~
~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~
~"The function you just attempted is not yet implemented"~


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Aindreas Gallagher
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 1, 2014 at 11:41:00 pm

apple still might have mis-cued. They took a stance that they could make their own intellectual statement on editing working from the base they had.
it doesn't really look like that worked out. even on a profit perspective X isn't arcing where you would want it to go off the graphs. virtually all long form that was 7 is now avid, and short form Disney and Viacom, CNN, Reuters, BBC worldwide, Hogarth and a pile of others are transitioning to Premiere Pro.

what apple strategically had with 7 they simply don't have anymore. they constructed FCPX as a laid egg in private and now they have that.

http://vimeo.com/user1590967/videos http://www.ogallchoir.net promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics


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Bill Davis
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 2, 2014 at 6:04:04 pm

[Aindreas Gallagher] " they constructed FCPX as a laid egg in private and now they have that.
"


Good to see you back on form, Aindreas.

Takes me back to the first year here when you were constantly crowing about X being a toy, a disaster, and not capable of anything serious.

Then we lost you for a while when you had to face the fact that it was selling well and doing excellent work.

And now it appears having placed your bet on Premier, you've gone back to your original form. It's kinda comforting. Good luck with the emotional separation.

If you're making a clean break, you might want to avoid the "round table" show this next time. They've moved it to 1pm Pacific Coast Time because of the interest in Europe (where the show often airs in the middle of the night.)

I know this because they're flying me out to do the show, so to keep your blood pressure down, you can either find something else to do during the live show - or perhaps save up some overripe fruit for chucking at the screen?

Wish me luck - or not.

Your call.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Steve Connor
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 31, 2014 at 4:11:04 pm

[Aindreas Gallagher] "still: what's the deal with that inspector issue?"

I'm not sure it's an issue for many, I hardly ever close it.

No sig on my posts as it's apparently very old fashioned


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Aindreas Gallagher
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Aug 30, 2014 at 10:41:01 pm

“One day someone could be the star, the next day that person could be at the bottom of the pile,” a former Apple PR employee said. “A lot of people would leave after a year or two under Katie; it was like walking on eggshells,” added that person. She “struck fear in hearts and took years off my life,” another person said. “But it was good for you, it was a real baptism for me,” that person added.

that in no way sounds like an 80's machined jobs avatar. mad read.

does anyone remember the account of the meeting he took with fox on the ipad intro where he turned up in a top hat for rupert murdoch?
barnum zelig oz.

http://vimeo.com/user1590967/videos http://www.ogallchoir.net promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics


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JP Pelc
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 2, 2014 at 7:56:32 pm

Personally I hate Apple and it's PR. Don't get me wrong, OSX is great along with many other Apple products, but the fanboyism that is displayed for this company is ridiculous. The sense of allegiance, pride, elitism, awe, wonder that people get from looking at a man on stage talking about a cell phone with 2 new features is a bit over the top, and it's mostly generated by the PR department and their ridiculously gated and self-worshiping promo events. Bleh


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Tim Wilson
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 2, 2014 at 8:22:02 pm
Last Edited By Tim Wilson on Sep 2, 2014 at 8:33:18 pm

My antipathy for Apple can be seen from outer space.

But I don't agree AT ALL that Apple PR is manufacturing excitement. Can't be done. All PR can do is place stories and try to manage their content. Your example of 2 new features on stage is actually on the nose: that's not PR. It's a dude on stage. Make of it whatever you will, but there's no message to manage. It is what it is.

I say this as a guy whose company included a bustling PR business, worked with both corporate and agency PR as an industry writer, and from inside major companies as both a message generator and someone with direct responsibility for interacting with both corporate and agency PR, and press, on outbound messaging. Even in a room full of confetti and balloons and a cheering throng, putting a guy on stage, no matter how well-managed and rehearsed, is a crap shoot. You simply can't control response. Print is way, way easier.

But I do think that messaging has always been a core value at Apple, maybe moreso than any company in history. The message IS the product. To the extent that their messaging strategy is shifting, it represents a shift in Apple's core values. That's a big deal, whether you like Apple or not....

...because we could get into a whole 'nother conversation about how Apple drives even the behavior of non-customers. In fact, we could start a whole forum about it.

In fact, we did. LOL


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JP Pelc
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 2, 2014 at 9:09:01 pm

Hahaha.

Well whatever you want to call it there is this culture surrounding Apple that drives me crazy, and it seems to me that it is exactly the culture they want to generate. However, it is encouraging to read that the new CEO is planning on taking things in a more transparent direction. I was unaware of that until today, as I don't exactly spend a lot of my free time reading details about the company


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Tim Wilson
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 2, 2014 at 9:39:05 pm

[JP Pelc] "Well whatever you want to call it there is this culture surrounding Apple that drives me crazy"

You'll note that I didn't disagree with you on that :-) ....

...and which we have also created a forum for people to explore every possible angle on the matter. LOL


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Steve Connor
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 2, 2014 at 9:46:52 pm

[Tim Wilson] "[JP Pelc] "Well whatever you want to call it there is this culture surrounding Apple that drives me crazy"

You'll note that I didn't disagree with you on that :-) .."


People like to like things, there's a culture around sports teams that drives plenty of people crazy too.


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Walter Soyka
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 2, 2014 at 11:29:40 pm

[Steve Connor] "People like to like things, there's a culture around sports teams that drives plenty of people crazy too."

People like to dislike things, too. Again, see this forum and culture around sports teams.

Walter Soyka
Designer & Mad Scientist at Keen Live [link]
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
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Bill Davis
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 3, 2014 at 9:00:21 am

I actually think it's weirder than that.

We watch as people crowed about how GREAT their personal discovery is when they feel they are "special" knowing about it when other don't. Then, when appreciation becomes widespread, they turn on a dime and again have to again prove the superiority of their opinion and judgement all over again by hating on the very thing they loved when loving it separated them from the masses.

Jim Morrison was right. People ARE strange.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Tim Wilson
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 3, 2014 at 11:27:49 am

[Walter Soyka] "[Steve Connor] "People like to like things, there's a culture around sports teams that drives plenty of people crazy too."

People like to dislike things, too. Again, see this forum and culture around sports teams."


And people like to dislike people who do the exact same things THEY do, except they do it for the other team. Nobody thinks a New York Yankee fan is more obnoxious than a Red Sox fan, and vice versa. It's the nature of great rivalries.

That said, there are definitely some fans who are obnoxious by nature, and often revel in it. Pick any (or all) of a dozen different Philadelphia stories, starting with booing Santa Claus.

I think we can also all think of somebody outside the world of sports whose vociferous fandom feels like it's that intense for the sole purpose of causing disquiet in non-fans. Or likewise, people overstating their non- or anti-fandom for the same reason.

I'm most certainly not thinking of anyone here when I say that.

Or am I?

My point was that I don't have any issues with someone finding either fandom or non-fandom obnoxious. Both definitely can be, and, kidding aside, I think it really is more common around phones than computing platforms or even FCPX.


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Steve Connor
Re: Apple PR - A Review (9to5Mac)
on Sep 3, 2014 at 11:30:59 am

[Tim Wilson] "I think it really is more common around phones than computing platforms or even FCPX.
"


"iOS or Not?"


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