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Interesting article from 1995: Is Non-linear editing the future?

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Andy Neil
Interesting article from 1995: Is Non-linear editing the future?
on Aug 29, 2014 at 6:03:16 pm

I thought this was an interesting blast from the past considering the current upheaval of NLE systems these days. It's a pros and cons article about why or why not you'd want to edit non-linear.

http://www.videomaker.com/article/1214-edit-points-linear-vs-nonlinear-edit...

Andy

https://plus.google.com/u/0/107277729326633563425/videos


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TImothy Auld
Re: Interesting article from 1995: Is Non-linear editing the future?
on Aug 29, 2014 at 7:00:02 pm

I remember reading this article. Thanks for posting. I was drawn to NLE's from the first moment I learned of them because it was like film editing. If you cut something out that you found you needed you could just grab it from the bin and put it back in. None of that pesky taking the master down a generation to make a change that didn't fit. And none of that very pesky audio being married to video.

Tim


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David Mathis
Re: Interesting article from 1995: Is Non-linear editing the future?
on Aug 29, 2014 at 8:13:40 pm

The good old linear editing model. I first learned on a system that had no time code, it was the good old reliable control track. Meaning you had to lay down black first but no edit was frame accurate. Was always fun after spending hours of shuttling tape back and forth that a shot was missing in the middle. This meant many more hours of editing. At least hooking up the system was straightforward and no need to worry about your NLE being compatible with the latest OS, not to mention trouble shooting plug-ins that would not work.

One other downside was the low quality analog format we worked with, next generation of tape would look worse then the first. Good, high end quality VHS or S-VHS was the only options available.

One nice thing, however, was one standard frame rate and NTSC, sometimes referred as Never Twice the Same Color, the good old days.

Wish we could just have one standard and it be the only standard. Having to deal with technical details makes editing not so much fun.

I guess one thing with working in X is no need to play "Track Tetris". I prefer just Tetris, at least it is a game.

camera operator | editor | production assistant


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Bob Zelin
Re: Interesting article from 1995: Is Non-linear editing the future?
on Aug 30, 2014 at 1:56:52 pm

great article. Everyone who is established thinks that anything new sucks. Quantel Paintbox artists thought that Adobe Photoshop was a joke. I knew engineers at NBC NY that called AutoCAD "Autotoy".
Film editors (the old ones that cut film) thought that linear video editing was for kids, and not real editing. And of course, Linear CMX Editors thought that the AVID was a joke. Same applied to FCP (because AVID was the way that professionals edited). And I laugh seeing the OLD 30 year olds who think that FCP 7 is the only thing, and Premiere is just junk.

It's just interesting that when you are young, you are open to new ideas, and open to learning new things. And then once you "grow up" and start to make a name for yourself, and have responsibilities (like a wife, kids, a house, a car), all of a sudden, none of this stuff is cool anymore, and you just want to do your job (because you are so much better than that 24 year old), and be left alone. And no matter what comes out (camera, recording device, computer, editing or graphics software) - IT SUCKS because you are not an expert on it, and you can do the "same thing" with your old piece of junk, and after all, none of "your" clients are asking for that new thing (who needs HD video !).

I think that life is wonderful when new things are developed - I don't care if it's our business or any other business. But most "older" people just hate it - be it music, art, technology, sports, etc. They just want to be left alone. I like to torment those people.

Bob Zelin

Bob Zelin
Rescue 1, Inc.
bobzelin@icloud.com


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Herb Sevush
Re: Interesting article from 1995: Is Non-linear editing the future?
on Aug 30, 2014 at 2:22:13 pm

[Bob Zelin] "Film editors (the old ones that cut film) thought that linear video editing was for kids"

While I'm with you on everything else, I still believe this statement to be true as far as actual editing was concerned. Which is why I jumped on the non-linear bandwagon so quickly.

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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Jason Brown
Re: Interesting article from 1995: Is Non-linear editing the future?
on Aug 30, 2014 at 6:36:14 pm

Along these lines, I read a quote from Douglas Adams that I love reminding myself of when I see something I don't like:

http://highscalability.com/blog/2014/3/11/douglas-adams-3-rules-that-descri...


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Don Walker
Re: Interesting article from 1995: Is Non-linear editing the future?
on Aug 31, 2014 at 10:56:43 pm

As somebody who has gone through the 1" machine to machine, - CMX - Harry - Axial - Video Cube - Media 100 - Avid - FCP 7 to FCPX course in my career, I find that at 53, I still love to edit! I did my first ever complete edit on an iPad yesterday! Editing a family movie to post on Facebook. I had a blast! I remember in 1991 going to NAB and being terrified of the Toaster. It was a threat to the $750,00 D2 suite my employer paid me to edit in. But as time has gone on I have come to the realization it's not so much the tools that make it fun, as it is the process.

PRE-READ FOREVER!

don walker
texarkana, texas

John 3:16


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Interesting article from 1995: Is Non-linear editing the future?
on Aug 31, 2014 at 11:25:43 pm

Thanks for posting the article.

A couple things popped into my head after reading it. First, I wonder how much longer linear video editing would have stuck around if digital video tape formats had become the norm much sooner. The generational loss of linear editing was one of the draw backs and obviously that's a nonissue if you are working with digital assets and 'cloning' data from one tape to another.

Second, it reminded me of when I worked at a post house in '04/05 and they were all Avid except for one linear bay. They kept the linear bay around because it was faster to work online to make a highlight reel from a day's shoot than to offline/online that process. I might be wrong, but I think when the linear operator retired is when they switched that last bay from linear to nonlinear.


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Walter Soyka
Re: Interesting article from 1995: Is Non-linear editing the future?
on Sep 1, 2014 at 3:46:42 am

I think that it's easy to forget that non-linear editing on a computer actually was a joke, right up until the moment that it wasn't. I'd argue that this applies to almost any new technology.

For me, the question of timing -- when to adopt a new technology -- is just as interesting, challenging, and exciting as choosing which new technologies to adopt.

Walter Soyka
Designer & Mad Scientist at Keen Live [link]
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
@keenlive [twitter]   |   RenderBreak [blog]   |   Profile [LinkedIn]


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Herb Sevush
Re: Interesting article from 1995: Is Non-linear editing the future?
on Sep 1, 2014 at 2:56:00 pm

[Walter Soyka] "For me, the question of timing -- when to adopt a new technology -- is just as interesting, challenging, and exciting as choosing which new technologies to adopt."

Timing is a major dollar question for sure. I've come to believe that with hardware I always want to be behind the curve and with workflow a little ahead. One of the problems with timing hardware is that it's not nearly good enough to make the best choice on the merits, because often a technically inferior option will win audience share due to non-technical realities (in other words, the stupidity of man.). Deliverables are dependent on the market, if not I wouldn't still be dealing with Quicktime. Same goes true for dealing with origination codecs. The one place I can afford to be aggressive is in the space in between those two fixed points.

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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Mark Suszko
Re: Interesting article from 1995: Is Non-linear editing the future?
on Sep 2, 2014 at 3:28:59 pm

I really was grateful for the discipline I learned in mastering linear editing techniques first, before NLE's were invented (or at least popularized). At the same time, it was always clear to me that story-telling in film is often done with a non-linear narrative.

About the same time and NLE technology was ascending, I was also fascinated by the nascent movement to writing "hyperfiction" - stories with hyperlinks that allowed the reader to alter the story he was reading thru his own choices... or, in most cases, not really altering the story, but the order in which its parts were told. Hyperfiction didn't take off then, though, because I think the interface options were few and clunky - no tablet readers like today.

Around the time our bosses were trying to decide on jumping into NLE's, Grass Valley began offering a drop-in rack replacement for a one-inch or D-2 deck, that was hard-disk based and responded to a linear edit controller just as if it was a tape deck. This was an amazing device that could let you keep using your linear systems and expertise, but add the layering and pre-read tricks of D-2 machines to your plain BetaSP and one-inch infrastructure. It slashed time spent making b-rolls and c-rolls and trying to match them back to A-rolls. it added speed ramping effects as well.

I have always though that Grass missed a huge opportunity in "hybrid" editing by pricing these disk drive systems waaaay too high for the corporate/prosumer markets. We were able to go with an early Premiere-based system or a Panasonic Postbox, for less money than buying the Grass Valley drive systems.


I still miss the precision and feel of using the EECO EMME linear controller, with it's rosewood-faced control panel.:-)


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