FORUMS: list search recent posts

8 core or 12 core?

COW Forums : Apple Final Cut Pro X Debates

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Jeremy Garchow
8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 5, 2014 at 10:56:17 pm
Last Edited By Jeremy Garchow on Feb 6, 2014 at 2:43:54 am

FCPX
Adobe CC
Color Grading
Transcoding (encoding)
FCS3 (



)

What do you buy? Why is this so confusing?

More but slower processors, or less but faster processors? I just want the best computer.


Return to posts index

Erik Lindahl
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 5, 2014 at 11:07:06 pm

We went with an 8-core system. Better bang for the buck, in theory faster in many situations. At single threaded apps the 8-core will be much faster, where if 11 or more core are used in the 12-core machine it should have an edge but below that probably not. Primarily that means 3D and possibly video transcoding, but most tasks don't scale that well sadly.

If we need more power we'll add a secondary 6- or 8-core system. Being able to completely offload work has its benefits.

For certain tasks the 12-core will rule. RED RAW on the CPU for example. But RED will have proper OpenCL acceleration in their SDK soon. My guess in NAB.


Return to posts index

Darren Roark
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 1:54:08 am

If you are going to be doing color grading I would recommend the 12 core. You can do full 6K debayer with Red Dragon footage. The 8 core can do it, just not as consistently.

For editing, the 8 core is the way to go.


Return to posts index


Oliver Peters
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 2:31:16 am

Or, if you don't believe in the future of 4K mastering and don't use FCP X near-exclusively, you could go with the 6-core and D500. Faster processors than the 8 or 12-core.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
Orlando, FL
http://www.oliverpeters.com


Return to posts index

Darren Roark
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 3:04:13 am

[Oliver Peters] "Or, if you don't believe in the future of 4K mastering and don't use FCP X near-exclusively, you could go with the 6-core and D500. Faster processors than the 8 or 12-core."

The six core with the D500s will leave every computer I have ever owned in the dust, but I still am getting the D700s. To me it's not about mastering in 4K at the moment, it's about being able to get jobs started quicker without transcoding first. FCP X and Premiere with GPU muscle both do great at this, and both have ways of creating proxies later.

With Premiere Pro and AE having much better OpenCL performance on CC along with Resolve, the D700s really help future proof the investment. The extra $600 for double the VRAM and performance is an easy choice for me. Looking at the price of the workstation PC versions of those cards it's a steal.

The great thing about the 'classic' Mac Pros is how useful the six year old models still are with an upgraded GPU. But with no way of knowing if there will be an option to upgrade them in the future, I'm not going to regret spending extra on it now.


Return to posts index

Oliver Peters
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 3:09:20 am

GPU is the hardest decision. Premiere really doesn't make as much use of it as you think. There are tons of plug-ins that really choke PPro regardless of the GPU. AE makes almost no use of it. FCP X and Resolve are the best. However, even though the GPUs are upgradeable, it's unlikely that we'll see a lot of choice diversity in the future, simply because this form factor will have a limited market. I would imagine nothing from Nvidia - unless Apple makes some sort of deal with them again.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
Orlando, FL
http://www.oliverpeters.com


Return to posts index


Dennis Radeke
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 7, 2014 at 2:52:08 am

[Oliver Peters] "There are tons of plug-ins that really choke PPro regardless of the GPU."

This is because they do not utilize the GPU by and large and therefore go through the CPU. In the future, I hope to see many more plug-in companies utilize the new ability to tap into the GPU through Premiere Pro and accelerate them.

[Oliver Peters] "Premiere really doesn't make as much use of it as you think."

Well, I guess it depends on how you look at it. The approach is about balance. I said this back in 2010 when CS5 was out via a blog post, but I'm not going to go digging for it! ;-)

CPU's decode video and create playback. GPUs are used for FX including basic transforms such as scale (picture-in-picture), position, rotation, etc. Any Premiere Pro effect or transition that is hardware acclerated makes a big difference in total performance. This includes big things like almost all color correctors including Speedgrade LUTs. If you are doing work with very little effects work, then you're absolutely right.

Dennis


Return to posts index

Oliver Peters
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 7, 2014 at 3:36:55 am

[Dennis Radeke] "This includes big things like almost all color correctors including Speedgrade LUTs"

Yikes! Really? No offense, but I've found the Lumetri LUTs to cause a Premiere timeline to really drop in performance. This is via the Direct Link roundtrip. Nowhere near as responsive as using Colorista II, which isn't accelerated to my knowledge. Maybe Lumetri is only optimized for PCs or CUDA. It's certainly sub-par on a Mac Pro with an ATI card. I'm comparing performance to FCP X with several layers of Color Board (or even the Color Grading Central LUT Utility) or Avid Symphony with real-time color correction - all on the same machine. I agree, that other Premiere Pro color effects are accelerated, but I just haven't see it with Lumetri effects.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
Orlando, FL
http://www.oliverpeters.com


Return to posts index

Franz Bieberkopf
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 4:43:36 am

[Darren Roark] "Looking at the price of the workstation PC versions of those cards it's a steal."

... and there's the myth again.

Franz.


Return to posts index


Darren Roark
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 10:04:01 pm

[Franz Bieberkopf] "[Darren Roark] "Looking at the price of the workstation PC versions of those cards it's a steal."

... and there's the myth again.

Franz."


http://wccftech.com/generation-amd-professional-gpu-arrives-firepro-d700-le...

The reviewer states "Interestingly the D700 (Practically a Rebrand) has not been physically disabled any further than the W9000 yet it gives about 0.5 TeraFlops less compute than the AMD FirePro W9000."

So instead of 4 TeraFlops it does 3.5 which is a lot, otherwise it's the exact same card that costs $6800 for a pair of them. Some theories are that the D700s are more like the gamer 7970 cards which still go for about $1000 for a pair of them. If you get applecare, you are covered on them for three years should they fail, so I'm guessing they must be pretty durable.

Since we have no idea what upgrade possibilities there will be in the future, the extra $600 for much better GPUs makes sense. Adobe, Apple, and Resolve keep increasing the importance of the GPU and I think it will gain even more importance in the next few years.


Return to posts index

Franz Bieberkopf
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 7, 2014 at 1:22:43 am
Last Edited By Franz Bieberkopf on Feb 7, 2014 at 1:24:43 am

[Darren Roark] "... otherwise it's the exact same card that costs $6800 for a pair of them."

Darren,

If you have more information (ie. that they're "the exact same card"), please post. But I think less is known that what you assume. I'll quote again from the previous thread:

I don't know if anyone's actually looked to see if the Apple FirePros have other FirePro specific features yet? Anandtech don't go into things like 30-bit colour output (10-bit per channel, consumer cards can process this but won't output it), Order Independent Transparency under OpenGL, ECC for onboard cache memory, EDC for memory bus protection, and various other FirePro only features.

(Rick Lang further confirmed that they 10-bit colour but since OS X doesn't support 10-bit colour yet, you can utilize the 10-bit colour if you boot up under Windows.)

http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/335/65215#65238

From your link (above), you can add the 7970:

D700
Stream Processors: 2048 SP
Memory Bus Width: 384 Bit
Memory Bandwidth: 246 GB/s
Compute Performance: 3.5 TeraFlop
VRAM: 6Gigs
Core: Tahiti XT

7970
Stream Processors: 2048 SP
Memory Bus Width: 384 Bit
Memory Bandwidth: 246 GB/s
Compute Performance: 3.79 TeraFlop
VRAM: 3Gigs
Core: Tahiti XT

I think the 7970 was released mid 2012, now discontinued, but it retailed for less than 500.00 I believe. The only differences between it an the D700 according to the chart are the performance and the VRAM.

I suppose you might be getting $6800.00 of GPU for about 1000.00. Or you might be getting something more like what you pay for.

Franz.


Return to posts index

Julian Bowman
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 8:14:01 am

I only use FCPX and Motion 5 with DSLR footage and in the end plumped for the 6 core with D700 cards thinking it'll run well and get me the most years out of the machine before needing to consider a new one (self employed one man shop), so it is really nice to read posts that validate my instinct. Thanks.

And now we are in Feb (alleged delivery month), please hurry up Apple. I'm tired of my 2009 machine being sluggish in large projects and crashing in large projects. It's like it knows it is going to end up on ebay and is playing up even more at the moment. The wife keeps teasing it arrived and she hid it in the loft, but I can't find it there anywhere!



Return to posts index


Marcus Moore
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 3:54:08 am

If we're talking about the same Barefeats article [where the 6-core D500 outpaced the 12-core D700 in some test], the one metric that was missing from those tests was an 8-core D700 machine, and it will be really interesting to see how it measures up. The 8-core processor has a much higher turbo boost than the 12-core, much more in line with the 6-core. But as the Barefeats article suggests, some processes seem to be limited by the number of CPU threads they can physically use- and in those cases the 6-core 3.5GHz (and presumably even more the 4-core 3.7GHz) will always win out.

A really complete matrix of MacPro configs will undeniably prove that no machine is going to be the fastest for every application (or even for every process within an application); and the user really needs to decide what their primary job is, and configure to that. Hopefully that doesn't mean that your SECOND most important task is too compromised. For example, the best machine for FCPX and the best machine for AE are probably about as polar opposite as you can get- and that's when the hand-wringing begins...



Return to posts index

Mark Dobson
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 6:27:22 am

I'm still waiting for a New Mac Pro vs a topped out 2012/13 27" iMac comparison.

Maybe I've missed it?

Whilst I've lusted after the new machine for years I can't really fault my iMac for the type of work we do which is making documentary style programmes using single cam native files. To get a significant performance boost and from what I've been reading I'd be better off investing in a 12GB Raid system than a new computer.

But should Apple upgrade their Thunderbolt monitors I would be sorely tempted with the 6 core and D700s. It would be nice to join the party!


Return to posts index

Erik Lindahl
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 1:07:09 pm

[Mark Dobson] "I'm still waiting for a New Mac Pro vs a topped out 2012/13 27" iMac comparison. "
We have a pretty much maxed out 8-core MacPro on order I will test against a MacPro 2008 that it replaces as well as an iMac 2012 I use at my home studio. Sadly this will be weeks or even months away seeing how Apple is having some production issues with the new MacPro.


Return to posts index


Marcus Moore
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 3:37:55 pm

Well, I haven't seen my ship date slip from February yet. But I also haven't heard that people who managed to order earlier than me have started to receive theirs yet either.



Return to posts index

Andre van Berlo
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 10:17:28 pm

I ordered my 6core D700 on the 19th and it has "shipping in february"

On January 30Th I got an email from apple(I was very excited to see that email!!) telling me it'll probably be shipped in February and that they will give an exact date of delivery once it's ready to ship.(but the happiness didn't last very long...)

Don't understand why they send me that email, as nothing changed in my status, is was "shipping in february" and still is...

Did you get an email like that?


Return to posts index

Marcus Moore
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 7, 2014 at 2:22:30 pm

No, but I've been in contact with my Apple business rep a few times.

Did the email come from "Apple" corporate, or from your local contact? I'd imagine business reps are having to juggle a lot of anxious clients who really want their machines.



Return to posts index

Andre van Berlo
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 7, 2014 at 4:54:19 pm

"Did the email come from "Apple" corporate, or from your local contact?"

it came from Apple corporate. It's my first mac pro so I doubt they'd actually have someone call me personally. I figure myself in the category "bonus buyers", people who buy the mp they didn't count on... :-)

Hopefully I won't have to wait till february 28th!


Return to posts index

Erik Lindahl
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 12:53:56 pm

[Oliver Peters] "Or, if you don't believe in the future of 4K mastering and don't use FCP X near-exclusively, you could go with the 6-core and D500. Faster processors than the 8 or 12-core."
This isn't really true. Even if it gets a bit messy with base clock and turbo clock speed of the new MacPro's it virtually looks as follows:

If 1 core is used
- 4-Core = 100% CPU speed
- 6-Core = 100% CPU speed
- 8-Core = 100% CPU speed

- 12-Core = 90% CPU speed

If 2 cores are used
- 4-Core = 100% CPU speed
- 6-Core = 97% CPU speed
- 8-Core = 103% CPU speed
- 12-Core = 86% CPU speed

If 4 cores are used
- 4-Core = 100% CPU speed
- 6-Core = 97% CPU speed
- 8-Core = 95% CPU speed
- 12-Core = 86% CPU speed

If 6 cores are used
- 4-Core = 100% CPU speed
- 6-Core = 146% CPU speed
- 8-Core = 138% CPU speed
- 12-Core = 122% CPU speed

If 8 cores are used
- 4-Core = 100% CPU speed
- 6-Core = 146% CPU speed
- 8-Core = 184% CPU speed
- 12-Core = 162% CPU speed

If 12 cores are used
- 4-Core = 100% CPU speed
- 6-Core = 146% CPU speed
- 8-Core = 184% CPU speed
- 12-Core = 243% CPU speed

The 8-core will perform similarly to the 4- or 6-core offerings. There might be cases where the 6-core is faster than the 8-core but quite seldom.

The 12-core will only be fastest if 10 or more cores are fully saturated. This is quite uncommon in most tasks but for example video encoding or 3D-rendering can, with relative ease, saturate the machine I think.

Price / performance I think the 6-core probably beats the 8-core but on the 8-core you have similar performance in most tasks and decent multithreaded tasks should be upwards 25% faster.


Return to posts index

Jeremy Garchow
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 5:17:20 pm

[Erik Lindahl] "Price / performance I think the 6-core probably beats the 8-core but on the 8-core you have similar performance in most tasks and decent multithreaded tasks should be upwards 25% faster."

Thanks so much Erik. The barefeats tests are what's most confusing to me, but there early isn't a straight comparison of 6 ,8, and 12 cores with either D700 or D500 in all of them. But the 6 core D500 is faster than the 12core D700 in the tests they performed with FCPX/Motion. I never use the water pane effect, so I don't really know what those tests mean to me.

http://barefeats.com/tube05.html

Anandtech's review only had a 12 core.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/7603/mac-pro-review-late-2013/6

I need a jack of all trades machine, meaning it needs to do a little of everything (GPU/CPU/Both) and it sounds like the 8 core might be the best bet, although I'm sure the 12 core isn't a slow machine and should hopefully be faster than our dusty cheese graters. As time goes on, and perhaps programs get updated for the newer Mac hardware, maybe the 12 core will be the better long term investment? Am I just lying to myself with that statement? I'm torn, and actually stymied. I have been sitting on this purchase for three weeks.

Jeremy


Return to posts index

Erik Lindahl
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 6:00:45 pm

Well, mutli-threading has always been a problem. A lot of apps don't scale well or scale to 3-4 cores. Here the 12-core machine will suffer.

What's more, currently the multi-core machines take a bigger hit in general performance due to poorer base and turbo speeds per core.

I'd say the 8-core is the current-gen sweet spot if you can afford it. Otherwise the 6-core. The D700 are a given to me as well as at least 32 GB of RAM (we went with 64).


Return to posts index

Jeremy Garchow
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 6:05:10 pm

I am planning on maxing out everything else (RAM, GPU, etc).

The 8 core does seem to be the sweet spot today, and Anandtech had the same conclusion.

Thanks for your insights.

Jeremy


Return to posts index

Erik Lindahl
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 6:47:12 pm

No worries. I also think moving forward, even if we get better threading in apps (RAM-previews in AE or dynamic link rendering in PrPro CC are a joke today) I think the main boost will come from GPU-acceleration. In video-land FCPX, PrPro CC and Resolve have shown this clearly.

Moving on things like RAW-decoding will move to the GPU I'm quite sure of. Already today RED CINE-X has support for this for RED RAW (given it's still BETA) as well as Resolve has GPU-support for Sony F65 decoding.

Other features should also move there in due time. That's where by far you can get the biggest boost in performance. Even a maxed out wintel-Xeon today might have 2X the CPU power than a maxed out MacPro 2013 in an optimal multithreaded scenario. If you instead run computational tasks on the GPU's you're talking multiple times greater increase in performance. It won't work for everything but it does work for a lot.


Return to posts index

Franz Bieberkopf
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 7:34:09 pm

[Erik Lindahl] "I also think moving forward, ... I think the main boost will come from GPU-acceleration."

Erik,

While it's good to hear about things like Red Cine X developing GPU support (if I read you correctly), it's probably worth revisiting the GPGPU discussion around the MacPro for context.

http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/335/65215
http://arstechnica.com/apple/2014/01/two-steps-forward-a-review-of-the-2013...

"Despite the hype, the GPU still plays second fiddle to the CPU, and that won't change for most demanding creative applications despite Apple's accomplishments with FCP X. A complete transition from CPU to GPU computing isn't going to happen, ... You can't rely on a GPU the way you can the CPU, and developers already know this."
[...]
"I have a deep understanding of how my hardware is used and what the limitations of the GPU are. Despite the accomplishments of Resolve and FCP X, this thinking about the GPU as a silver bullet for everything computationally intensive is actually waning. The inflexible and difficult-to-program GPU cannot replace the CPU for everything. While there are some exceptions that manage to tap both GPUs and the CPU for maximum output, those applications are not the norm."
(arstechnica)

His concerns about development at Apple re: OpenCL are also of interest.

What I took away from that discussion is that a balanced system is still fundamentally important - CPU, GPU, and the software end that can use both efficiently. While the Mac Pro is certainly an interesting development, it isn't clear what the trade-offs they've settled on will mean in the long run.

Seems like the system you want if you're running FCPX, though.

Franz.


Return to posts index

Marcus Moore
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 7:20:02 pm

8-core, otherwise maxed out is what I went with as well.

I'm sure I'll get it someday...



Return to posts index

Jeremy Garchow
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 7:22:32 pm

[Marcus Moore] "I'm sure I'll get it someday..."

You'll get it before we do!!! ;)


Return to posts index

Marcus Moore
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 7:29:48 pm

Due to lease signing and the holidays, my order didn't go in until the 26th. Ugh!

My shipping form still says February. That's all I've got at this point!



Return to posts index

Mitch Ives
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 8:40:37 pm

[Erik Lindahl] "Price / performance I think the 6-core probably beats the 8-core but on the 8-core you have similar performance in most tasks and decent multithreaded tasks should be upwards 25% faster.

I'd say the 8-core is the current-gen sweet spot if you can afford it. Otherwise the 6-core. The D700 are a given to me as well as at least 32 GB of RAM (we went with 64)."


To me the ram, the SSD and the GPU's were clear. The tough decision was the cores.

To me, the decision wasn't between 8 or 12, it was between 6 or 8. In the end I went with the 8. It really is the sweet spot. So few programs can use 12 cores, and if they can't, it's the slowest in the bunch...

Mitch Ives
Insight Productions Corp.

"Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfills the same function as pain in the human body. It calls attention to an unhealthy state of things." - Winston Churchill


Return to posts index

Ben Mullins
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 9:11:38 am

I noticed that too, that the more cores you want the slower the processor speeds are. Why?

3.7GHz quad-core with 10MB of L3 cache

3.5GHz 6-core with 12MB of L3 cache [+ £400.00]

3.0GHz 8-core with 25MB of L3 cache [+ £1,600.00]

2.7GHz 12-core with 30MB of L3 cache [+ £2,800.00]



Return to posts index

Erik Lindahl
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 1:12:00 pm

[Ben Mullins] "I noticed that too, that the more cores you want the slower the processor speeds are. Why?"
Basically each CPU as a threshold of how much power (W) it's allowed to use before it starts to damage the system. Hence a 12-core machine has to be clocked lowered than a 4-core machine.

However, all CPU's have the option of using their "turbo boost" feature which will change the picture above quite a lot.

4-Core Machines scale from 3.9 Ghz with 1 core to 3.7 Ghz with 4 cores active
6-Core Machines scale from 3.9 Ghz with 1 core to 3.6 Ghz with 6 cores active
8-Core Machines scale from 3.9 Ghz with 1 core to 3.4 Ghz with 8 cores active
12-Core Machines scale from 3.5 Ghz with 1 core to 3.0 Ghz with 12 cores active

As I wrote in another reply, the 4, 6 and 8-core machine will be very similar when 1-4 cores are used. The 6-core will have a slight edge at 6-core activity, the 8-core at 8-core. The 12-core machine will only be favorable when 10 or more cores are being used.


Return to posts index

Ben Mullins
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 1:15:52 pm

Ah OK, thanks Erik.



Return to posts index

John Heagy
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 8:22:01 pm

I tested both a 12 core and an 8 core with Episode, an app that loves cores.

The 6 core converted an 60 min ProRes 1080i file to 720p60 xh264 in 75min

The 12 core did the same job in 57 min 25% faster

The last 2.93G 8 core Xserve did it in 94 min

John


Return to posts index

Erik Lindahl
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 6, 2014 at 11:43:44 pm

Nice. Video encoding can be very multithreaded. Was the above 12 core vs 8 core or 6 core?


Return to posts index

John Heagy
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 7, 2014 at 12:02:14 am

Ooops...

*6 core should be 8 core. We also have a 6 core but I did not set it.

Corrected below...


I tested both a 12 core and an 8 core with Episode, an app that loves cores.

The *8 core converted an 60 min ProRes 1080i file to 720p60 xh264 in 75min

The 12 core did the same job in 57 min 25% faster

The last 2.93G 8 core Xserve did it in 94 min

John


Return to posts index

Jeremy Garchow
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 7, 2014 at 2:52:13 am

Thanks, John. That's a pretty hefty savings.

Jeremy


Return to posts index

Erik Lindahl
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 7, 2014 at 12:42:31 pm

Very interesting in deed. Depending on your needs however, two 6-core systems would possibly fair better than this and land in the same ball-park cost. I know certain codecs scale much worse than h264 / x264. If you could do some WMV, MPEG2 and general QuickTime (ProRes, Uncompressed, possibly DV) codec tests on top of the above that would be awesome.

I wonder if we'll see Telestremes GPU accelerated x264 codec for Episode by NAB? They've already released it for Vantage which is much more expensive system.


Return to posts index

John Heagy
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 7, 2014 at 4:27:18 pm

[Erik Lindahl] "two 6-core systems would possibly fair better than this and land in the same ball-park cost"

The thought did cross my mind. The 12 core is $3000 over the 6 core, but doubling up on CPUs means the same for Episode Engine licenses which retail for $3400. Throw in the fact that the NMP is half as rack space efficient as the Xserve, and the cost of addition fiber infrastructure, more bang per CPU is better.

With something like this... http://www.mk1manufacturing.com/store/cart.php

Replacing our 20 Xserve Episode cluster will go from under half a rack to nearly a full rack. Thankfully it will be 60% faster.

It may be possible to use two of these mounts, one facing front and another facing back, but that would require airflow up the center and out the top of the rack.

John


Return to posts index

Erik Lindahl
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 7, 2014 at 4:35:57 pm

All true and sound. But I see the good scaling is in Episode Engine. I wonder how their desktop product will fair. I don't think it scales as well due to lacking the split and stich tech. Interesting never the less.


Return to posts index

Jeremy Garchow
Re: 8 core or 12 core?
on Feb 7, 2014 at 4:57:55 pm

[John Heagy] "With something like this... http://www.mk1manufacturing.com/store/cart.php"

Yes! We are getting so close to JetPacPro.


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]