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Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.

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Don Scioli
Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 1:32:08 am

Having recently finished cutting a long form doc on wine with hours of field footage in record time, I realized the ability to rapidly skim through the footage clips in the event library, then directly input and outpoint edit points, was a tremendous help. I realize I could do this in 7 but the implementation of this technique in X was much quicker and accurate. Perhaps this is FCPX's strongest feature offering to date.


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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 3:39:17 am

[Don Scioli] "Perhaps this is FCPX's strongest feature offering to date."

Sadly, it's traditionally been a capability that editors who simply try to "learn" X by launching a timeline and studying how X's storyline operations work - tend to push way down their learning curve.

They also used to tend to come here and yell about how lame X is as an editing process before they ever understood that there actually WAS an event library and how X's coordinated editing functions actually work in consort with it.

But things are better now.

The people who don't like X now are increasingly that smaller group for whom it's unique attributes just aren't relevant - which is fair, in my estimation. I think we're finally beyond the stage where people trash it just because the timeline doesn't work like the one in Legacy.

Well, most people. ; )

So that's progress!

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Herb Sevush
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 3:04:22 pm

[Bill Davis] "The people who don't like X now are increasingly that smaller group for whom it's unique attributes just aren't relevant "

Whether that group is smaller or larger has never been established. Your stating it does not make it so. Otherwise, a reasonable posting.

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 3:11:53 pm

Herb,

Let's please have another discussion about made-up numbers.

That's Numberwang!






Franz.


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Steve Connor
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 5:24:10 pm

"Numberwang" Franz? Brilliant!

Steve Connor
'It's just my opinion, with an occasional fact thrown in for good measure"


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Chris Harlan
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 5:30:49 pm

[Steve Connor] ""Numberwang" Franz? Brilliant!
"


Indeed! I think that the forum's thumbs-down button should be replaced with an icon of someone with the "NO" sack over their head.


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Aindreas Gallagher
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 9:57:49 pm

[Bill Davis] "But things are better now.

The people who don't like X now are increasingly that smaller group for whom it's unique attributes just aren't relevant - which is fair, in my estimation"


In the estimation of your dreams Bill Davis.

FCPX is rightly trashed for a number of good reasons. And scale relative to editing industry, you guys are in a pokey shack in the woods, by a dim fireplace, waving your hands and saying - "the magnetism is amaaazing - when are they bringing out the ipad edition??"

http://vimeo.com/user1590967/videos http://www.ogallchoir.net promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics


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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 6:12:00 am

[Aindreas Gallagher] "In the estimation of your dreams Bill Davis.
"


Yeah, but my dreams are informed by experience. I now understand TWO alternative editing approaches.
You're kinda stuck in ONE. It's ALL you know. So I guess it's understandable that you'd defend it to the death. To do otherwise is to face the fact that you might someday be LESS prepared than some others if the change continues to blow through the world. Oh, I know you're convinced that editing 5 years hence will be precisely like it was five years past. (nothing to see here but SAFE and incremental changes that dont' rock your boat. The editing version of a nice bland diet.) But for all your hostility about this stuff, nobody listening really thinks that the editing industry in the future is going to be JUST like it was in the past now do they? The ONLY question is how fast and how far it changes. Who will cling and who will move along.

But you go right ahead and calcify your current thinking. And good luck with it.


[Aindreas Gallagher] "FCPX is rightly trashed for a number of good reasons. And scale relative to editing industry, you guys are in a pokey shack in the woods, by a dim fireplace, waving your hands and saying - "the magnetism is amaaazing - when are they bringing out the ipad edition??""

You BET that's an accurate assessment. (wait, that's exactly it. You're BETTING that you don't have to change anything and that you can find another tool just like the one Apple snatched away from you (hurt, huh?) and then you'll finally be emotionally whole again.

Well, good luck with that approach.

Some of us are watching nearly everything about the world (including those pesky tablets you hold in such contempt that every freeking manufacurer on the planet seems to be jumping on-board with!) change. And we're fine with that.

Something about being flexible. Open minded. And perhaps even oddly unafraid that makes us so ready to look around rather than living with our heads down a dusty hole labeled "EDITING circa 2008."

Hell, even the folks at Adobe and Avid aren't doing that. Only Aindeas. Who has the mighty crystal ball and knows where everything is headed and is convinced that nothing new has any value for HIM.

Surprising you take the time here. If I were you, I'd spend my time down with the punters. Since you know the future, the races will likely just be more SURE BETS for you too!

Happy winnings!

; )

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Steve Connor
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:22:03 am

Well this thread was pretty civil for a while at least.

Steve Connor
'It's just my opinion, with an occasional fact thrown in for good measure"


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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 8:17:49 pm

[Steve Connor] "Well this thread was pretty civil for a while at least."

Notice that I seldom fire back at anyone unless they call me out BY NAME.

Kinda my "rules of engagement."

Which I think are pretty fair.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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James Ewart
clinging on to nurse's apron
on Feb 22, 2013 at 11:56:49 am

... in another Forum one of the Avid stalwarts confessed he really couldn't be bothered to have to learn new software...and over here in Europe we are not as good at change as you lot. I've said it before but just look back ten years. Everybody dismissed FCP 1 thru 5 as a "non professional" tool as they do with FCP X. I find the intense dislike of FCPX irrational and it smacks of fear to me.

If it "works" (albeit differently) then what's the big deal?


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Bret Williams
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 4:12:47 am

[Don Scioli] " I realize I could do this in 7 but the implementation of this technique in X was much quicker and accurate"

There was nothing even remotely similar to this function in FCP 7.


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TImothy Auld
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 2:37:30 pm

[Bret Williams] "There was nothing even remotely similar to this function in FCP 7."

You can scrub through thumbnails in 7. I think that may be what he meant.

Tim


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Bret Williams
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 3:35:52 pm

Yes, but you can only scrub the thumbnail in list view, not in icon view. And you can't set ins and outs on the thumbs either. Have to click on them to scrub as well. Plus, they're literally the size of a thumbnail.

The finder is actually a much more efficient and powerful way to preview media in FCP 7 land. Before I switched over to X I found myself using the finder to search clips. The icons could be huge, and all you had to do was press the spacebar and then arrow left right up down through the clips.


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Neil Goodman
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 4:25:12 pm

To me and alot of others, theres no denying the skimmer is great, and lots of other features are amazing but the timeline still needs tons and tons of work, and imo thats the most important feature.

Neil Goodman: Editor of New Media Production - NBC/Universal


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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 5:59:14 pm

[Neil Goodman] "but the timeline still needs tons and tons of work, and imo thats the most important feature."

If your orientation remains that editing begins and ends in the timeline, I'd fully agree.

The whole point about X is that it's built to challenge that historical view.

In X, your editing can easily begin in the event browser. And if you understand that, when you finally get into a storyline, you can conceivably have an extremely large amount of your actual editing already done.

This is one way X can drive immense efficiency.

But you've got to understand the difference in order to benefit from it - and it's still my contention that most editors who have trouble with X (not ALL, but most) do so because they've not yet come to understand this new two stage process.

FWIW.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Steve Connor
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 6:04:27 pm

I would disagree that liking FCPX is dependent on understanding a different way of editing, I appreciate your "two stage process" but like many I prefer the tactility of the timeline for composing edits and I would say that, despite some people's strong doubts, FCPX is great for this.

Steve Connor
'It's just my opinion, with an occasional fact thrown in for good measure"


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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 6:57:30 pm

Steve,

If I gave the impression that X wasn't great at timeline editing, I'm sorry. That's totally opposite of my view.

My concern is that experienced editors who come to X with lots of experience in more traditional timeline operations get STUCK with the differences of how X works compared to their expectations, and it often takes a long time for them to overcome the "reset frustration" and start to understand how the differences built into this program have a lot of value to offer.

That's a story told here time and time again by those of us who've made the learning curve climb.

Essentially that until I knew how to operate it, I didn't really know what I was missing.

That's not to say it's ideal for all editors, just that it's significantly not what they're used to - and that means it won't typically be easy to just dive in and swim happily from day one.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 11:37:22 am

absolutely my experience...hatred at first but just couldn't believe Apple could create something so bad so back i came time after time and thanks to you lot and ripple Training I emerged and wonder now what the fuss was all about. Over here in the UK the Avid community are still slating it of course.


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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 5:31:02 pm

[James Ewart] "thanks to you lot and ripple Training I emerged and wonder now what the fuss was all about. Over here in the UK the Avid community are still slating it of course.
"


Be kind to the disbelievers. It's NOT easy to grasp. And I think it's important to remember that most people in this industry are already so busy trying to keep up with technology changes that not taking time to dive too deeply into perhaps "difficult to easily grasp" new concepts is kinda understandable!

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Charlie Austin
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 11:35:21 pm

[Steve Connor] "I would disagree that liking FCPX is dependent on understanding a different way of editing, I appreciate your "two stage process" but like many I prefer the tactility of the timeline for composing edits and I would say that, despite some people's strong doubts, FCPX is great for this."

Totally agree. My editorial workflow is pretty much the same in 7, X, or anything else. What I mean is, it's the same, but different. ;-) Also, skimming is truly amazing, and I fully expect that other NLE manufacturers are madly trying to copy it as we speak. Hopefully Apple continues to raise the bar while addressing the shortcomings we all debate here ad nausea. ;-)

-------------------------------------------------------------


~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 9:19:35 am

me too!!


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Neil Goodman
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 7:13:51 pm

[Bill Davis] "If your orientation remains that editing begins and ends in the timeline, I'd fully agree.

The whole point about X is that it's built to challenge that historical view.

In X, your editing can easily begin in the event browser. And if you understand that, when you finally get into a storyline, you can conceivably have an extremely large amount of your actual editing already done.

This is one way X can drive immense efficiency.

But you've got to understand the difference in order to benefit from it - and it's still my contention that most editors who have trouble with X (not ALL, but most) do so because they've not yet come to understand this new two stage process.

FWIW."


I edit most of my material in the bins or events as final cut x calls them before goin to timeline, but either way, once i graduate from rough cut to second and eventually final, ALOT of editing goes down in the timeline. Trimming/moving/replacing/deleting, etc ,etc. This is where X needs the most work IMO, especially trimming.

The process doesnt change from NLE to NLE. Same approach as Avid PPro or Final Cut Legacy. I dont know any editors who simply throw a ton of clips in a timeline and go with out selecting outs and doin marks etc. It isnt any different in X as building a rough cut goes and doing basic 3 point editing. X strength really lie in making arough cut, but once i have to do any complicated editing to get to a second cut or final, thats where it falls apart. again mainly in the trimming .

Its not like the timeline is hard to get used at all. Id like to say at this point i understand it and its behaviors really well. I jjust don't think its superior to other NLE's and its got a long way to go before it can stand in the same arena with Avid and PPRo

Neil Goodman: Editor of New Media Production - NBC/Universal


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Steve Connor
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 7:27:35 pm

If you think FCPX fails in its trimming and that means it "can't stand in the same arena" as the others, then presumably you thought that about FCP Legacy? The trimming in FCPX is better than Legacy.

Steve Connor
'It's just my opinion, with an occasional fact thrown in for good measure"


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Chris Harlan
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 7:51:27 pm

[Neil Goodman] "I dont know any editors who simply throw a ton of clips in a timeline and go with out selecting outs and doin marks etc."

And, if they do, they are simply using a timeline as a bin.


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 9:24:58 pm

[Neil Goodman] "I dont know any editors who simply throw a ton of clips in a timeline and go with out selecting outs and doin marks etc."

Neil,

As Chris Harlan has alluded, many editors work more or less exclusively in the timeline, doing what might be called "sequence-based" (as opposed to "bin-based" or "clip-based") selection and editing.

That is the way I work, and all my clips go into sequences without any previous selection or marking.

Franz.


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Herb Sevush
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 10:20:58 pm

[Franz Bieberkopf] "That is the way I work, and all my clips go into sequences without any previous selection or marking."

+1

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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David Lawrence
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 12:37:44 am

[Herb Sevush] "[Franz Bieberkopf] "That is the way I work, and all my clips go into sequences without any previous selection or marking."

+1"


Yep!

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Charlie Austin
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 1:35:42 am

[David Lawrence] "[Herb Sevush] "[Franz Bieberkopf] "That is the way I work, and all my clips go into sequences without any previous selection or marking."

+1"

Yep!"


-1 Nope! lol

It would be nigh impossible for me to cut that way. My cut sequences generally end up between 5 seconds and 2.5 minutes long. My source clips are generally 1.5 to 2 hours long, with up to 5 stereo stems embedded. it would be an unimaginable nightmare to try to cut that way. I guess it depends on what sort of program you;re doing...

-------------------------------------------------------------


~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 1:40:54 am

[Charlie Austin] "My cut sequences generally end up between 5 seconds and 2.5 minutes long. My source clips are generally 1.5 to 2 hours long, with up to 5 stereo stems embedded."

Charlie,

Your typical ratios and sources sound quite similar to mine.

To each his own method.

Franz.


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Charlie Austin
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 1:44:42 am

[Franz Bieberkopf] "Charlie,

Your typical ratios and sources sound quite similar to mine.

To each his own method.

Franz."


Yep... I'd really like to see how you do it. My head would explode. :-)

-------------------------------------------------------------


~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 1:49:29 am

[Charlie Austin] " My head would explode."

That's probably the main reason I resist editing-as-spectator-sport.

Franz.


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David Lawrence
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 1:51:57 am

[Charlie Austin] "Yep... I'd really like to see how you do it. My head would explode. :-)"

Some of us have been using the timeline in Legacy for skimming for years. Just saying... ;)

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Charlie Austin
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 1:59:01 am

[David Lawrence] "[Charlie Austin] "Yep... I'd really like to see how you do it. My head would explode. :-)"

Some of us have been using the timeline in Legacy for skimming for years. Just saying... ;)"


Explain how that works. say I've got a spot I'm cutting in a sequence. So I open another timeline?, drag my 2 hour source into it, drag the playhead to an in point and... then what? i guess I don't get it, but how's that different from using the viewer?

-------------------------------------------------------------


~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 2:04:09 am

[Charlie Austin] "Explain how that works."

Charlie,

I certain won't speak for all here, but sequence-based editing tends to be subtractive rather than additive - at least in the initial stage. So selects are made by removing the unwanted rather than adding the desired.

It's different than using the viewer - because it's all in one place at the same time.

Franz.


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David Lawrence
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 2:12:44 am

[Charlie Austin] "Explain how that works. say I've got a spot I'm cutting in a sequence. So I open another timeline?, drag my 2 hour source into it,"

Yep.

[Charlie Austin] "drag the playhead to an in point and... then what?"

Whatever you want. Add a marker, select a range, set I/O, whatever.

[Charlie Austin] "i guess I don't get it, but how's that different from using the viewer?"

It's in a timeline. You have space to play around. You can easily skim and edit all in the same place. Doesn't matter how long the clips or finished sequence. Works great for me.

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Charlie Austin
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 3:09:48 am

[Franz Bieberkopf] "It's different than using the viewer - because it's all in one place at the same time"

[David Lawrence] "It's in a timeline. You have space to play around. You can easily skim and edit all in the same place. Doesn't matter how long the clips or finished sequence. Works great for me."




;-)

-------------------------------------------------------------


~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~


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David Lawrence
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 3:22:12 am

[Charlie Austin] "



;-)"


LOL! Try it! You'll like it!

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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 4:19:03 am

Have we revealed a schism in the church of pro editing?

It sounds like some editors here are "Preparationists" who spend significant time working with their source material before they hit the timeline.

And there's another class of "Reductionists" who are most comfortable tossing the maximum amount of material into the timeline - treating it essentially as a large scratch pad, then eliminating material until they reveal their preferred edit "in situ."

Both approaches appear to be perfectly reasonable to me. Just different approaches to the same problems.

Makes me wonder (particularly noticing that some of the loudest voices traditionally arguing here against the X approach - appear to be pretty reductionist by leaning) whether part of the resistance is that X flies a bit more in the face of the reductionist view than a preparationist approach?

(BTW, I know it's no where near as simple as this is making it sound. But it's still kinda interesting!)

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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David Lawrence
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 8:24:44 am

[Bill Davis] "Have we revealed a schism in the church of pro editing?

It sounds like some editors here are "Preparationists" who spend significant time working with their source material before they hit the timeline.

And there's another class of "Reductionists" who are most comfortable tossing the maximum amount of material into the timeline - treating it essentially as a large scratch pad, then eliminating material until they reveal their preferred edit "in situ."


I think you're on to something, Bill.

Back when tape ruled, I'd log and select during capture. As storage got cheaper, I moved to capturing whole tapes at a time and I think my work style evolved out of having these whole tapes as single clips. Much easier to throw them on a timeline and start prepping there. With tapeless, I now do the same with the card files. Sequences became my main log, prep and scratchpad space and I continue to use them that way.

I'm editing throughout the prep process so for me, it's not so much about "carving away" as it is carving, collecting, building piles and gradually sculpting the piece into shape. It's feels very fluid and organic.

It's different than say an "organize and assemble" approach, which I think FCPX supports especially well.

I don't think one way is better than the other - both are a matter of personal style and production need.

Interesting line of thought, thanks!

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Herb Sevush
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 2:37:29 pm

[Bill Davis] "Makes me wonder (particularly noticing that some of the loudest voices traditionally arguing here against the X approach - appear to be pretty reductionist by leaning) whether part of the resistance is that X flies a bit more in the face of the reductionist view than a preparationist approach?"

I think you might be on to something there. I think it's why many of the features of X do not overly excite me; things like skimming and keywords are not as much use if you do all your organizing with timelines. I'm not sure if it explains the resistance to the trackless timeline itself, but it might.

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 3:10:56 pm

Bill,

Though I take exception to your labels, I agree this is very much the case.

FCPX seems to be developed on the "bins then timelines" approach or what I've called "clip-based" editing model. (This doesn't mean it can't be used differently, but as Herb has pointed out, a lot of the appeal will be for those who work in clip-based approaches.)

That major design model, and the A/B model are very apparent to me (as I don't really base my approach on either).

Franz.


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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 5:44:15 pm

[Franz Bieberkopf] "Though I take exception to your labels, I agree this is very much the case."

As to the labels, I picked "reductionist" on the fly not to be perjorative, but as kinda a homage to the cooking world where a "reduction" is generally seen as a way to distill down something to it's essence.

In my Legacy editing years, that's pretty much exactly how I worked.

Try everything, and then re-work, re-edit and revise to reduce it to it's essence.

But I'm totally open to new terms if anyone has better suggestions...

I also think the discussion is perhaps important. Because it describes two major approaches to editing and I think there are a whole lot of excellent editors who fall into each camp.

The entire Event Browser construct in X can be seen as elevating the working style of preparationists. And I bet one big problem is that many extremely talented reductionist editors have more problems becoming comfortable with the two stage process since it interrupts their typical editing approach.

Worth thinking about, anyway.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 6:05:41 pm

[Bill Davis] "many extremely talented reductionist editors have more problems becoming comfortable with the two stage process since it interrupts their typical editing approach."

Bill,

I don't think it's a case of "becoming comfortable".

It's an issue of choosing a tool which fits my methods and workflow.

I see real value in what I've called sequence-based editing, as against clip-based editing. I want tools that support that (quite aside from technology workflow questions). If I see potential, I'll make the effort to "get comfortable" with whatever adjustments are necessary. I've done it before (when I switched from primarily Avid-based editing to FCP), and I'll do it again.

FCPX seems designed to support two-stage, "clip-based" editing as you've outlined many times. I think editors that work in that model see its strengths right away.

Franz.


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Steve Connor
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 6:17:29 pm

Lets not forget that you can work the same way in FCPX using compound clips instead of sequences. Your not forced to use FCPX's other tools!

Steve Connor
'It's just my opinion, with an occasional fact thrown in for good measure"


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tony west
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 6:45:22 pm

[Bill Davis] "Have we revealed a schism in the church of pro editing?

It sounds like some editors here are "Preparationists" who spend significant time working with their source material before they hit the timeline."



It's a good point Bill.

This has been a good thread. Really shows how different everybody works. I think it's also a credit to X
and it's improvements because this thread is mostly about taste and style.


Many of these NLE's have similar features but they are not exactly the same. There are differences in how they handle the same task.

It's those little differences that folks make their choice on sometime.


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Neil Goodman
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 5:00:30 am

Ive used timelines in the past as bins pulling selects, multiclips, syncmaps,marking etc, but would always copy paste to an empty timeline. I like to start with a empty slate and i feel like id be constant,ly wrestling with other clips on the timeline but to each his own. Whatever gets the job done.

Neil Goodman: Editor of New Media Production - NBC/Universal


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David Lawrence
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 5:24:48 am

[Neil Goodman] "I like to start with a empty slate and i feel like id be constant,ly wrestling with other clips on the timeline but to each his own. Whatever gets the job done."

I work that way too. What's nice is you can name each sequence and have them all at your fingertips in tabs.

_______________________
David Lawrence
art~media~design~research
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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 5:54:45 pm

[David Lawrence] "[Neil Goodman] "I like to start with a empty slate and i feel like id be constant,ly wrestling with other clips on the timeline but to each his own. Whatever gets the job done."

I work that way too. What's nice is you can name each sequence and have them all at your fingertips in tabs."


That sounds like what you're doing with tabbed sequences, are a basic form of what the X engineers built the Event Browser to do. Store, access, and make available previously worked on snippets of content.

They just added a pretty big universe of other possibilities by adding the whole keywording thing on top.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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David Lawrence
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 7:11:33 pm

[Bill Davis] "That sounds like what you're doing with tabbed sequences, are a basic form of what the X engineers built the Event Browser to do. Store, access, and make available previously worked on snippets of content."

It's that and more for me. I work with sequences like Herb describes and often have multiple sequences open at the same time with their clips fully exposed. I like that better than compound clips which can only be opened one at a time.

[Bill Davis] "They just added a pretty big universe of other possibilities by adding the whole keywording thing on top."

I like the event browser and think key wording is a powerful tool. But for the way I work most of the time, it would be an extra and unnecessary step. I like Franz's "clip-based" vs "sequence-based" analogy. I'm definitely "sequence-based" camp.

_______________________
David Lawrence
art~media~design~research
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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 7:14:53 pm

I have to agree that only being able to have one sequence (sorry project) open at any one time is somewhat limiting


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Steve Connor
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 7:32:21 pm

Limiting if you work in a particular way. As we are establishing in this excellent thread everyone works in different ways.

Steve Connor
'It's just my opinion, with an occasional fact thrown in for good measure"


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 7:44:54 pm

Okay but come on you surely must admit it would be handy to be able to click on tabs of different projects (sequences) rather than have to back paddle and open another one.

Forgive me but how could that be a disadvantage?


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Charlie Austin
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 7:56:06 pm

[James Ewart] "Okay but come on you surely must admit it would be handy to be able to click on tabs of different projects (sequences) rather than have to back paddle and open another one.

Forgive me but how could that be a disadvantage?"


Hopefully they'll make the project "history" buttons stickier, then it's kind of a non issue. For me the only difference between that and tabs is that X randomly closes sequences you had open making switching between projects hit and miss. Fix that and it's the same. Unless you like multiple sequence windows open at the same time, which I guess some folks do.

-------------------------------------------------------------


~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 8:00:41 pm

Okay I must have missed something again on my journey..."project history" buttons?

It's just handy to be able to click on tabs. that said with FCP 7 sometimes I would have so many sequences open I could get in a muddle.

I think FCPX is more like Media 100, in a way...you really should keep the main narrative on V1...I found this hard to get used to having adopted a more audio editor "checkerboard" technique with FCP7...but my timeline would get messy for sure. 12 video layers when I probably only needed three.

FCP X has made me more disciplined and organised


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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 8:37:29 pm

I guess I'm kinda missing how having a bunch of tabs open in Legacy and switching between them is functionally so different from having a dozen projects in your Project Library and being able to call them up at will.

You click on a tab - I click on the REEL icon.

We both navigate to the sequences (projects) we're looking for easily.

The only real difference to me is that I don't have to "load" my projects since I can skim them directly in the project library - and in Legacy, you need the entire sequence loaded in order to view what's in it.

But I guess I don't see much difference in the practical implications.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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David Lawrence
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 9:07:41 pm

[Bill Davis] "The only real difference to me is that I don't have to "load" my projects since I can skim them directly in the project library - and in Legacy, you need the entire sequence loaded in order to view what's in it."

The main difference is that multiple sequences can be open at the same time in their own windows. No only can you skim, you also have direct access to all your clips in the sequence.

While it's true you can skim projects in the project library, in order to have access to the individual media elements, you have to double click a project and open it up. And you can only do this with one project at a time. To me, this is limiting.

_______________________
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Chris Harlan
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 11:07:26 pm

[Bill Davis] "I guess I'm kinda missing how having a bunch of tabs open in Legacy and switching between them is functionally so different from having a dozen projects in your Project Library and being able to call them up at will."

For me the difference isn't when things are tabbed, as much as it is when multiple sequences and multiple Canvases are open all at the same time and spread across several monitors. Or even layered across a single monitor. I realize that a lot of people aren't aware that you can do this, but it is one of the more outstanding features of Legacy. Premiere lets you do it too. When I'm working in Media Composer, its the single thing I miss the most, though pop-ups and the delightful source timeline go a long way to mitigate that.


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Chris Harlan
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 10:57:00 pm

[Charlie Austin] "Hopefully they'll make the project "history" buttons stickier, then it's kind of a non issue."

Yes. This works very nicely and very quickly on both the Source and Record sides of Avid, and does a lot to make up for only being able to have 1.75 timelines open at a time (I DO like the Source Timeline quite a bit, and wish other NLEs had something like it.) Also, being able to open multiple sources as pop ups is nice. So, yeah, I agree that a responsive history button helps quite a bit, and might even be preferential on a laptop.


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Herb Sevush
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 2:30:57 pm

[David Lawrence] "It's in a timeline. You have space to play around. You can easily skim and edit all in the same place. Doesn't matter how long the clips or finished sequence. Works great for me."

It's much better than working in a viewer because all the clips are laid out in front of you - no wasted steps loading separate clips into a viewer then marking. This way you can directly skim through all of your clips in one stroke.

My workflow is to go thru generations of timelines, each one a reduction of the previous, until the final show emerges. Whenever the need to re-look at other material comes up you just pick the most appropriate timeline - anything from the previous version all the way back to the original assembly.

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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Chris Harlan
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 5:11:11 pm

[Herb Sevush] "My workflow is to go thru generations of timelines, each one a reduction of the previous, until the final show emerges. Whenever the need to re-look at other material comes up you just pick the most appropriate timeline - anything from the previous version all the way back to the original assembly.
"


This, generally, is how I work as well, though slightly modified. On the Sizzle I'm working on right now in 7, for instance, I started with a TB and a half of source material. I use bins to generally organize materials by show, categories of SFX, etc., and then I begin collecting material in theme/palette-based time lines which actually function as scrubbable bins. I then hone these timelines to finer, tighter versions, which I then use as scrubbable source "bins" for my actual project timeline.


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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 5:59:45 pm

[Chris Harlan] "I use bins to generally organize materials by show, categories of SFX, etc., and then I begin collecting material in theme/palette-based time lines which actually function as scrubbable bins. I then hone these timelines to finer, tighter versions, which I then use as scrubbable source "bins" for my actual project timeline."

Chris,

Reading this I had to think that if X ever develops to the point where you think it can meet your needs - and you dive in and embrace some future version at a deep level - you're going to be become downright DANGEROUS as an editor.

What you're describing seems like excruciatingly precisely what X's feature set is built to facilitate.

Time will tell.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Chris Harlan
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 6:54:11 pm

Hey Bill, I'm not sure what "dangerous" means, but I hope I became that some years ago. I definitely keep an eye on X, and I promise you if it ever feels like a good fit, I won't hesitate to jump in.


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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 8:46:06 pm

It just seems from the way you described your workflow, the tools in X might end up being something you'd really enjoy.

Dangerous was a compliment - it's an acknowledgement that you've learned how to make Legacy really sing despite it's aging feature set.

I'd imagine that if you had full access to "X-style" instant search, sort and find via tags in an NLE - but in an editing interface you could be comfortable with - it might make a big difference for you.

Nothing more than that.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 9:23:15 am

The entire clip into the timeline without having set an In and Out point first? What if the clip is twenty minutes long?
I fall into the category of some stuff I edit in the timeline and other stuff gets more accurately trimmed before dropping it in. Depends on what it is. At the end of the day I'm not sure it matters just so long as you can work the way you want.


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Sandeep Sajeev
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 9:05:32 pm

Bill,

Can you expand on your contention that editing in the event browser is more efficient?
How do you cut together complex scenes with foley, location audio, music etc without going into the timeline?

Thanks,
Sandeep.


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Charlie Austin
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 1:43:38 am

[Sandeep Sajeev] "How do you cut together complex scenes with foley, location audio, music etc without going into the timeline?"

You don't. :-)

Unless you create a CC in the event and open it in a timeline. But then you're in the timeline. You could probably assemble a keyword collection of, I dunno, interview clips or B-roll using ranges/favorites and then drag them all into a sequence, but for what you describe, there's no reason to try. Use a timeline. :-)

-------------------------------------------------------------


~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~


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Sandeep Sajeev
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 7:10:28 am

Charlie,

That's what I thought as well. So not sure what Bill means. I use X almost exclusively for offline now, and I find that Skimming, Ranges, Keywording and Smart Collections are what make the biggest difference in speed for me.

Not having to patch Audio Tracks is also great, when I sit on Smoke to finish, this drives me up the wall now.

But the actual process of constructing a scene/montage/film is pretty much the same, with some random terminology thrown in.

Sandeep.


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Bill Davis
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 9:13:37 pm

[Sandeep Sajeev] "Bill,

Can you expand on your contention that editing in the event browser is more efficient?
How do you cut together complex scenes with foley, location audio, music etc without going into the timeline?

Thanks,
Sandeep."


Editing in the EB is efficient because the decisions you make there are persiseant and are be shared across any and all subject storylines you want to use them with. When you understand X, you don't try to do EVERYTHING in the event browser, it's not designed to do that. It's designed to let you prep material, and attach keywords and metadata there so that you can use the constructions in one or more storylines later.

The productivity boost comes from being able to attach powerful search, sort and find criteria to ranges of your imported material.

Timeline editing is sill important if your goal is to do complex or refining work on your videos. That's why there IS a timeline in X - to finish your projects.

It's kinda like the difference in cooking between custom cutting everything in a single cooking session, verses doing all your prep chopping and sauce creation in advance, then combining the pre-worked ingredients into the recipe near dinner time.

It's just more efficient, the more prep you do in advance.

In that sense with X, it's no longer AS necessary to do EVERYTHING in the timeline. But it's equally true that the EB is no more suitable for full scale editing than a prep kitchen is for serving up a fine dinner. (I mean you're OK serving something simple like chopped raw carrots right out of the prep kitchen then you're cool... but it's NOT the place to do full scale cooking - and was never designed to be.

And if you choose to do stuff in the EB, there's a lot of bonus power you can harness that leverages the value of the work you do in the EB across multiple projects. Again, like prepping food in advance so you can serve large numbers of people very efficiently - or if you just want to cut down the work you have to do to create each and every plate of food.

Hope that helps.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Aindreas Gallagher
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 12:02:43 am

[Bill Davis] "Timeline editing is sill important if your goal is to do complex or refining work on your videos. That's why there IS a timeline in X - to finish your projects."

No - I'm deadly serious - this is hilarious.

http://vimeo.com/user1590967/videos http://www.ogallchoir.net promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics


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Aindreas Gallagher
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 10:46:25 pm

[Bill Davis] "[Neil Goodman] "but the timeline still needs tons and tons of work, and imo thats the most important feature."

If your orientation remains that editing begins and ends in the timeline, I'd fully agree.

The whole point about X is that it's built to challenge that historical view."


I'm sorry, but that is - laugh out loud funny - Kool aid.

http://vimeo.com/user1590967/videos http://www.ogallchoir.net promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 9:18:52 am

This is worrying me...you can scrub through the thumbnails in the browser in FCP?

I have never seen that...how?


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TImothy Auld
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 3:25:33 pm

If you mean in FCP 7 the browser must be in list view. Add thumbnail to the browser if you don't already have it there. Position your mouse over the thumbnail, left click and drag. It doesn't have much functionality beyond that.

Tim


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 6:41:39 pm

Well I don't' get any functionality if I don't double click to reveal in viewer...some feature I cannot find and is very new to me in FCP7


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TImothy Auld
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:25:03 pm

As I said, what I described is the only thumbnail functionality that I know of in 7. You can't mark in and out, you can't double click to to open anywhere. Even the thumbnail does not hold and will return to the first frame of the clip when you release the mouse. FCP X does do some of those things with the skimmer.
Hover scrub in CS 6 too.

Tim


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:28:20 pm

Sorry to be thick but could you elaborate further on the functionality you have in FCP7.

But sorry double clip on a clip in any view and it opens in the viewer...what version are you working on?


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TImothy Auld
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:36:12 pm

You can only scrub thumbnails in list view not in icon view. That is, as far I know that limit of what you can do with scrubbing thumbnails in the browser. Yes, you can double-click on any clip and open it in the viewer. You cannot double click on a thumbnail and expect it to do anything other than exercise your index finger. I thought this started with what you could do with thumbnails.

Tim


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Charlie Austin
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:29:00 pm

[TImothy Auld] "FCP X does do some of those things with the skimmer.
Hover scrub in CS 6 too.
"


Just to be clear, FCP X does all of those things, and a lot more, with the skimmer. CS 6 Hover Scrub does lets you mark I/O points, but very imprecisely.

-------------------------------------------------------------


~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:31:38 pm

I know that but earlier you said if you right click on an icon in the browser in list view it was possible to "skim" or scrub through clips...I must have misinterpreted because this is not the case


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Jeremy Garchow
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:40:20 pm

In FCP7, to scrub a thumbnail, you must use the little hand icon.

Control-h is the shortcut.

Jeremy


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:41:25 pm

okay Jeremy thanks could you walk me through this step by step please


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Jeremy Garchow
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:43:21 pm

Control-h

Scrub a thumbnail in browser or timeline.

It's not very useful.


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:52:23 pm

okay thanks well thats a new one on me but I agree pretty useless but something they have quite righlly looked at as an interesting function.

I hated FCPX.

But now it seems so much more intuitive


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David Lawrence
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 8:13:05 pm

[Jeremy Garchow] "Control-h

Scrub a thumbnail in browser or timeline.

It's not very useful."


It's designed to let you set the poster frame for the clip. It's it. It's not designed for editing.



_______________________
David Lawrence
art~media~design~research
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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:33:09 pm

"If you mean in FCP 7 the browser must be in list view. Add thumbnail to the browser if you don't already have it there. Position your mouse over the thumbnail, left click and drag. It doesn't have much functionality beyond that."

this is what I do not understand


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TImothy Auld
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:37:31 pm

Correct. Poor phrasing on my part.

Tim


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 7:38:49 pm

indeed


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David Lawrence
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 8:16:21 pm

[Charlie Austin] "CS 6 Hover Scrub does lets you mark I/O points, but very imprecisely."

Sorry Charlie, I don't know what you're talking about. Hover scrub lets you skim, and use full JKL keyboard control to find your I/O points. It's frame accurate. Maybe you're holding it wrong! ;)

_______________________
David Lawrence
art~media~design~research
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Charlie Austin
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 8:28:45 pm

[David Lawrence] "[Charlie Austin] "CS 6 Hover Scrub does lets you mark I/O points, but very imprecisely."

Sorry Charlie, I don't know what you're talking about. Hover scrub lets you skim, and use full JKL keyboard control to find your I/O points. It's frame accurate. Maybe you're holding it wrong! ;)"


Hey, you're right. I was holding it wrong. :-) I don't like it as much, but they did a good job of copying X! If they could copy clip skimming, and get rid of the tracks they'd be on to something! ;-)

-------------------------------------------------------------


~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~


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Chris Harlan
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 23, 2013 at 1:32:47 am

[Charlie Austin] " If they could... ...get rid of the tracks they'd be on to something! ;-)"

Like sending everybody else to Avid?


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Kevin Monahan
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 20, 2013 at 10:54:15 pm

[Don Scioli] "I realized the ability to rapidly skim through the footage clips in the event library, then directly input and outpoint edit points, was a tremendous help."

Check out Premiere Pro CS6's "Hover Scrub" feature. Does what you want, as well: http://www.retooled.net/?p=372

Kevin Monahan
Sr. Content and Community Lead
Adobe After Effects
Adobe Premiere Pro
Adobe Systems, Inc.
Follow Me on Twitter!


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Brett Sherman
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 12:38:38 am

For me it's a group of features that as a whole make finding footage a lot faster than it ever was in FCP 7 or Avid for that matter. Skimming, favorites, size of thumbnails, thumbnails update about 5X faster than in 7 when skimming (this makes a huge difference in finding the right material without accidentally jumping over it), keywords, thumbnails in the timeline, etc.

I won't say I'm 100% sold on the relational/magnetic timeline. There are things it does well and things it does not so well. It is neither a panacea nor a disaster. But I'm just learning it. My guess is that eventually I will be slightly faster with it than I am with 7. Right now I'm a bit slower.

But since I tend to spend a lot more time in the finding shots and soundbites part of the editing, I'm faster overall. And I enjoy editing more with X. That's the trump card.



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Charlie Austin
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 1:30:16 am

[Kevin Monahan] "Check out Premiere Pro CS6's "Hover Scrub" feature. Does what you want, as well:"

It's a nice feature. But other than a vague behavioral similarity, it's not anything like skimming.

-------------------------------------------------------------


~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~


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Nick Meyers
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 7:47:47 am

i use the timeline as a rushes preview & select area.

i edit mainly long form drama, some long form doc.

rushes for a scene are put in a timeline.
i watch the rushes, marking bits i like.
those parts get promoted to V2 & whatever audio tracks (I use a macro to do this, one keystroke and it;s done)

when i have made all my selects, i select all on v2, and edit them all to the end of the timeline (drag/drop into canvas)

now i have a library of "best moments" which i copy and work with.
during the edit, if we ever need to look for other shots, or moments, this library is first port of call, and usually has went we need.
if it doesn't, i can instantly see way HASNT been selected as all my V2 clips are still in place,
and i can search again.


i can't stand having to click open each clip just to view & select.
much prefer being able to "skim"
i haven't used X yet, but the skimming sounds good.


nick

nick


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Jeremy Garchow
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 5:31:08 am

*edited for clarity

[Nick Meyers] "i can't stand having to click open each clip just to view & select.
much prefer being able to "skim"
i haven't used X yet, but the skimming sounds good."


It's not only skimming, it's the entire Event browser.

I am, officially, starting my first series of broadcast spots on FCPX. There's no time like the present.

These spots are entirely sync sound, camera mic is used for reference audio, otherwise everything is scened/taked/slated, in other words, as organized as can be on a shoot without having real time logging on set.

Audio from 788T already comes in named as scene/take.

I imported all the media, and quickly went through and added scene/take to each clip that matched the slates.

I setup a custom naming preset and with one click renamed all video clips to "Scene_Take"

I then took each scene/take of audio and video and made synchronized clips.

I setup a Smart Collection to look for "Synchronized"

Then in the notes field, I selected all clips for the first spot and put the title of the spot in the notes.

This way, I can set a Smart Collection for the spot title to collect all assets if need be.

I also keyworded all those clips by spot (it's about 20 scenes per spot) which isn't a ton of overall scenes, but considering a spot is 30 seconds, it's a lot of scenes.

Some clips are MOS, I added those to the appropriate keyword. There's also separate wild sounds and those were keyworded.

I now have three highly organized and synced keyword collections with everything I need to edit with one spot in each collection.

I then went through each take in each spot and marked favorites, which, at this point, is every decent take as everything is still on the table.

After that I went through and turned off the camera mic and labeled each audio channel on each take (there's a total of about 14 characters across the three spots). I could do this in big groups of similar clips, which was really convenient as now I will probably not have to touch audio organization for the rest of the edit besides to add some further Roles/SubRoles as the edit evolves.

Let me repeat that: now I will probably not have to touch audio organization for the rest of the edit besides to add some further Roles/SubRoles as the edit evolves.

I then sort that keyword collection by favorites.

I know have either a list or a collection of skimmable thumbnailed selects for each spot.

None of this was done in a timeline (I used timelines extensively in other NLEs).

This was done on an older laptop with a single screen.

It was remarkable how much I could get done without all the timeline clutter (I repeat, I am a fan of timeline clutter).

All of this was accomplished in a little corner of the screen either on the left in the Browser, or on the right in the inspector.

Aindreas will piss all over this and that's fine.

The thought and capabilities that are present the Event Browser are where FCPX shines.

I don't care too much about going a ton faster (speed is important, but not the ultimate), I am more concerned about doing the job better, meaning I want to work more efficiently. More efficiencies can equate to speed, but don't have to be about speed. Currently, the organizational functions in FCPX are working better for me and my needs, despite some timeline quirks and limitations. Even though I am not overly concerned about blazing speed for this project, I did get to editing more quickly than I would have in 7 or Pr and that's ultimately what pays me, the edit.

Auditions are working great as well. They are pretty sweet for spot work.

Jeremy


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Aindreas Gallagher
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 23, 2013 at 11:39:23 pm

Jeremy mate - you know as well as I do that I have spoken pretty carefully in favour of everything bar the core timeline at this point.

http://vimeo.com/user1590967/videos http://www.ogallchoir.net promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics


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James Ewart
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 9:30:58 am

You won't like the primary storyline much! My old habit os boshing shots across v1,v1, v3, v4 etc had to go with FCPX. That was the thing for me that was the hardest to get my head round.


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Aindreas Gallagher
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 10:09:47 pm

very nicely it does.

and sure then stay - check out the veal - the curves, warp stabiliser, true keyframing, dynamic trim, AE integration, magic bullet that can actually render, crisp beautifully arranged minimal, customisable interface, open timeline, feel your jaw dropping at that notion of tracks, use the tilde key to focus hover explode any UI section to fullscreen (if you haven't tried that, you haven't lived)

then check out the suite! prelude - hey thats really nice! media encoder - hey! I get render complete reports and any issues, and its fully hyper thread enabled, rock solid, blazingly fast. Audition - man thats nice!

And hey - all those design assets, AE assets, they're just flying in and out. And you know, we're talking AE and PS - Gods own standard, right in there.

Maybe they're no motion, but I think they have a shot.

I'm...
so conflicted in the end - the barmy magnetic one off app silo, that gets no job postings, from the company that just blithely killed the entire FCP studio,

Or these crazy newcomers Adobe, working their ass off, in direct constant feedback and collaboration with professional industry from single shops to say associated press and - in some cases - large scale employee, london post production facilities, - with a particular focus on adobe anywhere for distributed asset workflow -

but so anyway, these Adobe dudes, they're apparently talking pretty constantly to all these guys on the direction and feature set of PPro. Blogs everywhere, they actually appear on forums and stuff - all kinds of things like that.


It is...
just so hard to figure the right choice here.
real, real Quandry.

http://vimeo.com/user1590967/videos http://www.ogallchoir.net promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics


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Joshua Pearson
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 11:07:01 pm

I haven't used X a ton yet, just messed around at home... but here's what I don't like about the timeline that noone else seems to be bothered by... i don't mind the horizontal magnetism, which of course can be nullified, its the vertical magnetism, or as i call it the "gravity", where all clips have this unstoppable gravitational attraction to the centerline... I use the tracks in my FCP7 sequences, especially during very complicated long-form, as reassuring method visual categorization, i.e. all my GFX clips on track 7, all my stock photos on track 6, etc. etc... same with audio, i push all my music down to tracks 10/11/12/13, etc... so can i very very quickly just zoom out to the big picture and SEE what my music is doing, SEE where clusters of photos or graphics are... i find this much quicker and more visually elegant than having "roles" show me where things are in a jumbled X timeline... it helps my brain feel organized simply by seeing the whole thing as an orderly graphic object, rather than the forced jumbled pile of blocks of an X timeline.

In short, I like to put things where I want to put them, vertically, and have them stay there.

Otherwise i really like X.



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Charlie Austin
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 21, 2013 at 11:54:18 pm

[Joshua Pearson] " ...rather than the forced jumbled pile of blocks of an X timeline.

In short, I like to put things where I want to put them, vertically, and have them stay there.

Otherwise i really like X.
"


Hopefully they'll make roles groupable so they'll stick together and, in a perfect world, maintain their position relative to on another. that would be nice...

-------------------------------------------------------------


~"It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools."~


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Chris Harlan
Re: Musings on FCPX's most powerful feature.
on Feb 22, 2013 at 4:40:51 am

Agreed. This is largely what the track v. trackless argument is about.


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