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NY Times article on the death of the death of mass media

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Herb Sevush
NY Times article on the death of the death of mass media
on Jan 7, 2013 at 4:01:15 pm

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/07/business/media/for-legacy-media-companies...

Apparently the brave new world is still waiting to be born.

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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Chris Harlan
Re: NY Times article on the death of the death of mass media
on Jan 7, 2013 at 11:44:23 pm

Yup.


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Andrew Kimery
Re: NY Times article on the death of the death of mass media
on Jan 8, 2013 at 6:40:53 am

It's reasons like this why I roll my eyes when I hear some proclaim that X is killing Y. CDs killed cassettes. DVDs killed VHS. Nothing is going to get 'killed' like that anymore because we are in a time of expanding, not replacing. Hell, 2011 was the first year online music sales beat CD sales (by a whopping .3%), vinyl sales are up and I've been hearing how MP3s and online distribution will kill music labels since '99.




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Jeremy Garchow
Re: NY Times article on the death of the death of mass media
on Jan 8, 2013 at 1:30:20 pm

Content is still king.

If Netflix et al were able to get the exact content they wanted and stream it all, they probably would be killing something, or at least stabbing them were they felt it. It would allow you to cut the cable cord and stream your content for 10 bucks a month.

There's no way content owners are going to give up the goods that easily.

If HBO offered independent for pay subscriptions without piggy backing on conglomerate distribution subscription, this article would be different.

Instead, studios and conglomerates pulled back, and Netflix is stuck making their own content to try and start their own killer content stream, and HBO makes killer content that keeps users paying the ever increasing cable bill.

They win, consumers lose.

This story from a few days ago is similar: http://www.businessinsider.com/intel-cable-2013-1

They make money on everyone, not just their target market.


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Andrew Kimery
Re: NY Times article on the death of the death of mass media
on Jan 8, 2013 at 5:46:30 pm

[Jeremy Garchow] "If Netflix et al were able to get the exact content they wanted and stream it all, they probably would be killing something, or at least stabbing them were they felt it. It would allow you to cut the cable cord and stream your content for 10 bucks a month. "

Maybe, but most of the world can't get streaming Netflix so there would still be a market for DVD/BR sales/rentals and TV deals. Not to mention some people prefer physical media and the advantages (be they inherent advantages or bonus content type advantages) that come along with it. Netflix not getting everything it wants isn't a conspiracy to keep the status quo but is in part a realization by large content creators that the streaming model works and they no longer necessarily need a middle man (be it cable or Netflix). HBO, for example, sees streaming in it's future which is why they are keeping their content off Netflix. Starz sees more streaming players in the future and probably hopes to start a bidding war which is why they didn't re-up with Netflix.

Even as we lament 'dinosaurs' such as Time Warner and Comcast for keeping change at bay they are in the process of morphing from cable TV provides to primarily content creators and/or ISPs. Every TW commercial I've seen on TV (just b'cast as I don't have cable) for the past year or two has been ISP-centric. How many cord cutters have cut the wired internet connection coming to their house?

Tablets, TVs, phones, computers, books, CDs, records, DVDs, game consoles, rokus... we no longer live in a one size fits all world which is why I don't buy into the whole X will kill Y thing. Fragmentation, not domination, is the new normal. Did NBC, ABC and CBS put up bigger numbers prior to the rise of FOX and cable TV? Sure, but none of the big three closed up shop, they all just shared small portions of the pie. For what it's worth vinyl record sales have reached a twenty year high and are still growing.




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Herb Sevush
Re: NY Times article on the death of the death of mass media
on Jan 8, 2013 at 5:52:21 pm

[Andrew Kimery] "For what it's worth vinyl record sales have reached a twenty year high and are still growing."

It's not worth much. It's not hard to grow if your merely going from minuscule all the way up to insignificantly tiny. Vinyl sales are merely a hipster fad, it is no longer a means of distribution.

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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Jeremy Garchow
Re: NY Times article on the death of the death of mass media
on Jan 8, 2013 at 6:07:53 pm

I hear you.

[Andrew Kimery] "Netflix not getting everything it wants isn't a conspiracy to keep the status quo but is in part a realization by large content creators that the streaming model works and they no longer necessarily need a middle man (be it cable or Netflix)."

No, I don't believe it's a conspiracy.

But what is odd is that there's even more demand, like the stories of the amount of bootlegging that happened with Game of Thrones because HBO didn't have a "for pay" subscription model outside of dealing with a bigger provider.

[Andrew Kimery] "How many cord cutters have cut the wired internet connection coming to their house?"

I don't know for sure, but my guess is not many. When you look at the total cable bill, and then the internet portion of that bill, it makes more sense.

But, there is more competition in the internet space than there is in the TV space. I have a large choice of providers, be it big media distributors, or littler ones. Wired or wireless. Mobile, or not so mobile.

What I don't have, is a choice of what I want to watch when I want to watch, unless, of course, I am subscribed to a premium provider with premium channels paying premium prices for shit I don't need.

[Andrew Kimery] "Tablets, TVs, phones, computers, books, CDs, records, DVDs, game consoles, rokus... we no longer live in a one size fits all world which is why I don't buy into the whole X will kill Y thing. "

I'm not sure about killing, but Y certainly has the power to reduce the size and influence of X provided someone really wants to do it. Stab them where it hurts.

Using HBO as the example, they could probably do it if they wanted to. But maybe they don't want to for now.

If cable was able to sell you per channel subscriptions, you don't think the overall size of some of the stations would get reduced? Or that there would be a few losses as a result of that model? What about the next generation? They will have been used to getting everything at their fingertips, virtually. There will be no digging in the crates, there will be no rerelease on digital video disk, no special 20th anniversary edition, essentially, no waiting around for distributors to shell out the content as they see fit.


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TImothy Auld
Re: NY Times article on the death of the death of mass media
on Jan 8, 2013 at 7:37:08 pm

I read an article recently, unfortunately I can't remember where, which stated that despite denials the cable companies do believe cord cutting is real and worse they know for a fact that young people are not buying cable subscriptions in massive numbers. So the business model being contemplated is simply to charge a boatload of money for your broadband connection. And if that's true then I don't think a buy-what-you-want system will be too far away.

Here's a WSJ article that kind of deals with this subject:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324073504578109513660989132.h...

Tim


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Joseph Owens
Re: NY Times article on the death of the death of mass media
on Jan 8, 2013 at 10:57:18 pm

YOu might also enjoy:

Read this on The Globe and Mail

Is Twitter turning TV into social media's hot new hub?
A half-century after Marshall McLuhan heralded TV’s participatory potential, live tweeting may finally be transforming the idiot box into a linchpin of interactivity. As Nielsen and Twitter announce a joint venture to produce Twitter TV ratings, Robert Everett-Green ponders the fallout – empowering and otherwise – of TV’s next act

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/television/is-twitter-turning-tv-into-s...

jPo

"I always pass on free advice -- its never of any use to me" Oscar Wilde.


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Andrew Kimery
Re: NY Times article on the death of the death of mass media
on Jan 21, 2013 at 9:31:12 pm

Late getting back to this one...

Herb,
Even if record sales are only a small percentage of overall music sales I still think it's interesting that this 'ancient' technology is selling better now than it was 20yrs ago (I'll give initial credit to the club/DJ scene for breathing new life into vinyl) and it helps illustrate my point about fragmentation. Digital downloads, CDs, vinyl, subscription services, internet radio, 'smart' internet radio (i.e. Pandora), broadcast radio... There's never been a time where customers could so customize how they could acquire/listen to music.


Jeremy,
I do think if an a la carte model was offered for cable it mean a reduction or programing as some shows/channels would not be profitable enough to continue. Of couse before we see an a la carte option form providers the providers will have to get an a la carte option from large content providers. One of my favorite ironies of 2012 was DirecTV complaining about Viacom only being willing to sell its content as a bundle.



Joseph,
Thanks for the link. Maybe it's my age (or just my lack of watching primetime TV in primetime) but I hadn't realized how much twitter has turned TV watching into a communal (if disembodied) experience.




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