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Joseph Owens
i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 3:10:23 pm

The Globe & Mail (Toronto/National Canadian newspaper) says the Apple we used to know no longer exists.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-investor/why-the-iphone-5-is-not-revol...

"The formula that late CEO Steve Jobs bet on in 2007 – refine and reimagine an existing product, create a new consumer category and then market it as a breakthrough – has transformed the company from niche player to a leader in consumer electronics and media."

Sound familiar?

jPo

"I always pass on free advice -- its never of any use to me" Oscar Wilde.


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Oliver Peters
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 3:25:53 pm

A few other articles to digest. A couple are contradictory, of course.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19557497
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19578015
http://www.businessinsider.com/iphone-5-apple-2012-9

- Oliver

Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
Orlando, FL
http://www.oliverpeters.com


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Steve Connor
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 3:41:35 pm

It's no surprise that a BBC report is critical of Apple!

Apple completely redefined the smart phone and have been constantly refining their design ever since, same as they did with the Mac and the iMac and the iPod.

Where can they go next? Commentators are suggesting TV's but that's going to take something very special.

Steve Connor
'It's just my opinion, with an occasional fact thrown in for good measure"


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Mark Dobson
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 5:12:59 pm

[Steve Connor] "Where can they go next? Commentators are suggesting TV's but that's going to take something very special."

How about a new Mac Pro?

Seriously though it looks like a great phone but not great enough to tempt me to upgrade from my almost antique iPhone4. And over here in the UK it's going to be awhile before we can really benefit from the LTE wireless technology. ( Unless you live in Cornwall )

However I might well be tempted by the rumoured scaled down iPad.


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Jeremy Garchow
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 5:15:13 pm

"Even as the iPhone 5 pleased millions of consumers with its improved battery life, larger screen and myriad other upgrades, it also made clear that the days of “revolutionary” Apple devices – those that create entire new product categories and come with massive risk for the company, as the original iPhone did – are over."

I guess what I don't understand is, what do people expect? A Transformer? The phone turns to Lear Jet? Some huge break through in hardware which is pretty generalized across all devices since a handful of the same companies make all the parts?....A FIVE inch screen? A stylus?

I don't understand it.

You buy any particular phone or computer or OS to help "fit in to your lifestyle" or help run your business more efficiently or perhaps you buy a certain phone because the network connection is better in your neck of the woods. If one fits better than the other, then your decision is made.

The category has been defined. You can't recreate the smart phone category with another smart phone that is made up of essentially the same parts. Ice Cream Sandwich has more consumers involved with it than iOS. Now you need to choose HTC or Samsung or whatever brand. The core Android OS will essentially be the same on whatever brand of device you choose. HP or Acer, it's still Windows. If you want the Mac experience, you by a Mac which usually means that you don't have the biggest, fastest, most powerful machine in your bay, or the widest, brightest, 4.499987654" cell phone display, or use a device with the biggest market share. This is the company that came in exactly last to the Intel race, everyone else had been in the running for a decade. Why are Apple's decisions any different today than 7 years ago, and why do Apple customers think they were any different back then than they are now? It's business as usual.

What is happening now is not much different than when Steve Jobs was around. I guess people are generally less impressed with everything now-a-days, even though everything is faster, cheaper, more advanced, and more convenient than ever.

I posted this in another thread, but it's worth repeating:







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Bill Davis
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 5:38:47 pm

The personal "transformation" that the iPhone started for me was to view the device not so much as a "phone" per se (which was what ALL my previous ones were), but as a personal connectivity terminal.

The device is less important than the services enabled for me by the combination of the device, the phone network and iCloud. All smartphones today are just pocket terminals.

My present cellular contracts run out in November, so a new iPhone is a no brainer - based on how well Apple has conditioned me to expect the new device to sync and replace my current device seamlessly. I'm confident that after a short Sync session - everything connected to my old phone will be seemlessly connected to my new one - and while I'll have a nicer screen and a thinner device, that's no where as important as access to the operational habits and app ecosystem that I've already invested my time in integrating into my life.

At some point, I'll want to plug my Square reader into my new phone and charge someone for something. I fully expect that to work perfectly the first time via the App and hardware consistency on the smartphone side.

I suspect that Android users have similar experiences, but I've got 4 years of time invested in knowing the iPhone/iPad workflow intimately - so what's the point of switching horses?

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Bret Williams
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 5:51:56 pm

[Bill Davis] "I suspect that Android users have similar experiences, but I've got 4 years of time invested in knowing the iPhone/iPad workflow intimately - so what's the point of switching horses?"

Is it? I don't know. I know my wife has an android and the way you sync photos, music, contacts, etc. is with the moto app because it's a motorola. Somehow, I think if her next android is an htc that she couldn't just plug it in and press a button.

Sure some techno geek would say there's a conversion tool somewhere or something, but isn't that the point? The mac ecosystem rocks if you dive in completely.


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Joseph Owens
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 6:01:36 pm

What is missing from the discussion is:

Is McKayla finally impressed?

jPo

"I always pass on free advice -- its never of any use to me" Oscar Wilde.


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Shawn Miller
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 6:05:29 pm

[Bret Williams] "Is it? I don't know. I know my wife has an android and the way you sync photos, music, contacts, etc. is with the moto app because it's a motorola. Somehow, I think if her next android is an htc that she couldn't just plug it in and press a button.

Sure some techno geek would say there's a conversion tool somewhere or something, but isn't that the point? The mac ecosystem rocks if you dive in completely."


I'm not a "techno geek", but I can say that there are multiple apps for synchronizing files and data across devices on Android. The Google apps for sync and sharing usually come pre-installed on Android devices, but they're easy to get if they're not (installed that is). It may also be worth noting that Google's ecosystem is cross platform. So data on Google Drive or Gmail will sync across Android, iOS, Mac OS, Windows or Linux.

Shawn

Shawn



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Oliver Peters
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 6:18:43 pm

The more interesting read is the third link I posted from Business Insider. According to their interpretation of documents from the Samsung suit, Apple earns about 2/3 of its total profits from iPhone. BI's estimated breakdown of profits is 60%-ish iPhone, 30%-ish Macs/software/iTunes/other, 10%-15% iPad. These are guesstimates from Apple testimony in court. This makes iPhone definitely the focus of the company's attention and puts a lot of expectation on them to not only perform, but OUTPERFORM. Otherwise the Street isn't happy. Add to this the fact that iPhone no longer leads in marketshare.

A sobering note for all of us here is that by definition, the majority of iDevice users are Windows/PC owners and NOT Mac owners.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
Orlando, FL
http://www.oliverpeters.com


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Shawn Miller
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 8:34:21 pm

[Oliver Peters] "A sobering note for all of us here is that by definition, the majority of iDevice users are Windows/PC owners and NOT Mac owners."

Sure, if you're talking about desktop devices that are internet capable, Microsoft will probably own that market for decades to come (this shouldn't be news to anyone). But the mobile device market really belongs to Google... taking a play from Microsoft's playbook, licensing the OS and owning the business that it generates (analytics, infrastucture, services, etc). I know it may sound bizarre to some here, but Apple's real competitor in mobile computing isn't Samsung, it's the company that's dividing the mobile device market amongst a slew of hardware and services vendors. Between Samsung, Google and Amazon, it will be interesting to see what the tablet PC landscape looks like in the second quarter of FY13.

Shawn



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Jeremy Garchow
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 10:18:29 pm

[Oliver Peters] "The more interesting read is the third link I posted from Business Insider. "

"Good or bad, the iPhone will define Apple's financial performance and reputation for at least the next couple of years.
If the iPhone 5 blows people away, Apple will be set up to clock another year of astounding revenue and earnings growth, at rates of growth never before seen for a company of this size. And the halo of magic and genius that still surrounds Apple and Apple products will allow the company to continue to command premium prices from consumers and a premium stock multiple.

If the iPhone 5 disappoints, meanwhile, analysts may have to cut their earnings projections for Apple. Worse, Apple will clearly have lost the lead in a market it created, one in which it used to be a full year ahead of any competition. If that happens, the magic halo will go "poof," and Apple will be perceived as just another company, rendered mortal and ordinary by the death of Steve Jobs."

Again, it's so sensational. Is the worry that Wall Street won't make shed loads of money on Apple one day?

The magic halo goes "poof"?

This guy gives Apple exactly one year before Apple becomes "ordinary"? What does that even mean?

Apple did not create the smartphone market. It helped move it along.

The 4 is now given away for free (via subsidy) with a 2 year contract, and the 4s for cheaper than the 5. They are still selling (and making money from) the new 'old' phones.

Why does the iPhone 5 have to blow people away? Can't it just be pretty decently good? What other device blows people away? Does Wall Street determine that? While there is a lot riding on it for "investors" in Apple stock who do nothing to add to the innovation but watch the ticker tape, are the company executives simply going to keep releasing the iPhone and stop 'innovation' else where?

Is the "phone" form factor going to be relevant in 5 years? 10 years? and do we think that Apple will really not try and come up with something new in that time?

Or is it really 'over'?

I don't know, this piece seems like a bat signal to investors who have nothing at all to contribute to Apple, to dump their stock in the near future as there's a decent chance that what goes up must come down. It's a cold world out there in business land.


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Michael Gissing
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 11:03:04 pm

It is important that Apple remain underdogs. Like any group that wants to maintain their quasi religious status amongst devotees they need to make the case that firstly they are different (style) and secondly that they are under a level of persecution. A lot of the recent patent warring has been about fostering that perception and trying to maintain a difference.

Probably the biggest difference is that Apple make more by selling less. And Bill is right that once in their system it is comfortable to stay in that system. Personally I am not swayed by that. My wife is, so I advised her to go iPad whilst I bought a Nexus.

Apart from developing a style and system, I don't see Apple as being particularly innovative. Sony, under Morita, brought us the revolution of the portable music device. Apple just made a stylish non tape version of the Walkman. Phones with screens and internet access were around before the iPhone. Apple just made it look good. Making hardware that looks good and software that reinforced difference and a simple but closed system is how I see Apple. Hardly innovative. Compared to how Sony changed the consumer world, Apple isn't yet in that league.


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David Lawrence
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 11:32:30 pm

[Michael Gissing] "Apple just made a stylish non tape version of the Walkman. Phones with screens and internet access were around before the iPhone. Apple just made it look good. Making hardware that looks good and software that reinforced difference and a simple but closed system is how I see Apple. Hardly innovative."

Have to disagree with you Michael. Apple did far more than make good looking hardware and simple to use software. They mainstreamed interactive digital media and technology in a way that no other company ever had before. Until Apple, MP3 players and smartphones were niche toys for technophiles. Apple single handedly created new digital consumer markets thru excellence in experience design.

I don't like the lock-in of their closed systems either, but I think their design innovation and ability to create markets has been profound. Whether that continues now that they're gone from underdog to the biggest company on planet earth, remains to be seen.

_______________________
David Lawrence
art~media~design~research
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Kevin Patrick
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 6:53:10 pm

[Jeremy Garchow] "it also made clear that the days of “revolutionary” Apple devices – those that create entire new product categories and come with massive risk for the company, as the original iPhone did – are over"

Note, the quote above is text from the article, not something Jeremy wrote.


I think I might understand what that person in the article might be trying to say, but I don't think you can (or should) say that Apple's revolutionary days are over. Or any other companies.

I think you can say that revolutionary products are very rare. Products that change or create entire industries.

The first mobile phone created an industry. A huge industry. There were a few products that came along to change that industry. Such as RAZR, which drove thin products in not only the mobile phone industry, but other industries as well. (iPod Nano)

The iPhone changed the industry again. The smart phone category existed, but Apple's approach was very unique. People loved it, competitors followed.

The iPod changed the mobile music industry. So much so, that competitors didn't follow, they ceased to exist.

The iPad changed the tablet industry. So much so that it really didn't become much of an industry until Apple showed up.

Is Apple done creating revolutionary, industry changing products? Well, with Jobs gone, maybe. I think it will certainly be harder for them to do so. But are they done? I'd argue no. And neither is anyone else. Apple, or someone, will come along with another revolutionary product. They are rare, so it may be a while. But it will happen.


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John Davidson
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 6:16:26 pm

All I want is a wristwatch iphone. Or maybe a button/communicator from ST: TNG. And wireless ear pods.

I have the nano watch and it is totally awesome. It's kind of sad that they didn't improve upon that.

If I could just get the iwatch though, that'd be cool. Then I could call my AI Trans-Am to get me out of sketchy situations, like revision meetings and budget negotiations.

It seems like tech is going the wrong direction these days.

John Davidson | President / Creative Director | Magic Feather Inc.


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Bret Williams
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 7:11:03 pm

[John Davidson] "It seems like tech is going the wrong direction these days."

Yup. Pontiac totally dropped the ball there.


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David Lawrence
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 6:45:09 pm

[Joseph Owens] "The Globe & Mail (Toronto/National Canadian newspaper) says the Apple we used to know no longer exists."

It's true. But I still think they make interesting hardware. Even if it's not the most powerful technology on the market, I still think it's well designed and a pleasure to use.

Apple software is another story.

This is a company that used to employ Don Norman as VP of Research and head of their Advanced Technology Group.

Now they make software with Rich Corinthian Leather and fake wood. FCPX's annoying chrome and animations come from the same design philosophy that chooses visual glitz over usability.

My inside sources say there's a big internal fight at Apple over the design direction of software. This recent article in Fast Company agrees:

http://www.fastcodesign.com/1670760/will-apples-tacky-software-design-philo...

_______________________
David Lawrence
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Bret Williams
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 7:08:33 pm

It was all pretty acceptable until iCal. I think that pushed it over the edge. Books still reside on bookshelves and they still look like books. Mail still comes in an envelope to everyones house. A camera still looks like a camera. Icons and images are used everywhere everyday to help us understand the point of something before we read it. Heck, that's the difference between TV and radio. Sure someone could tell us or describe something, but we grasp quicker through a combination of sound and visual.

But iCal threw it over the edge I think when they added the leather. It's a throwback to something many never used nor has any identification with. And in month view, clicking from month to month, I have to wait for the calendar page to turn. That's just bad. It's one thing if I want to physically turn it on my iPad instead of clicking the arrow, but if I click and arrow for the next page, by golly I think we have the technology to make that faster. They've actually slowed the user experience there. Ditto with week view. I have to wait for a week to scroll over to the next.

All that said, I think it looks kinda cool. Especially on my iPad, which is actually encased in a leather bound case resembling an old calendar/address book. The iPad is at least a physical device you interact with in ways that are similar to real books, with swipes and rotating, and such. I think they just did it (to a lesser extent) on the desktop version of iCal to be somewhat consistent. But if consistency was the goal, they shouldn't have used it on either and let the form follow function.

It's the same all over. Android is as inconsistent as it gets from app to app and phone to phone.


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Brian Mulligan
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 7:36:03 pm

Apple has been revolutionary... FCPX.

See how well that worked?

Brian Mulligan
Senior Editor - Autodesk Smoke
WTHR-TV Indianapolis,IN, USA
Twitter: @bkmeditor


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Bill Davis
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 14, 2012 at 6:26:31 am

[Brian Mulligan] "Apple has been revolutionary... FCPX.

See how well that worked?
"


See, perfect example.

It's worked more than wonderfully for me.

It's quite literally revolutionized my work since I've moved from just another of the two million people cutting on Legacy, to one mastering the complexities of something radical and new. Pretty exciting stuff and VASTLY less boring than two years ago where I couldn't swing a dead Apple Talk box on a cable without hitting fifty other guys who could also competently edit with Legacy.

It's now to the point that next year, I actually don't think I'll be doing do much of anything the way I did last year. And what a breath of fresh air that will be. I've been nearly 15 years doing my work the same way week in and week out. Now I can do something I love to do in a totally new environment with brand new tools. Big win for my psyche!

Tho I've got to admit that this year is amazingly difficult since two years ago I didnt' see my entire practice transitioning to an entirely new model - which is actually turning out to be astonishingly hard to pull off in many respects.

But it's still nice to be challenged to fit into something new rather than just keep making incremental headway in the same 'ol, same 'ol.

; )

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Oliver Peters
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 14, 2012 at 12:09:23 pm

[Bill Davis] "Tho I've got to admit that this year is amazingly difficult since two years ago I didnt' see my entire practice transitioning to an entirely new model - which is actually turning out to be astonishingly hard to pull off in many respects."

Difficult in what way?

Oliver

Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
Orlando, FL
http://www.oliverpeters.com


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Bill Davis
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 15, 2012 at 5:55:27 am

[Oliver Peters] "Difficult in what way?"

Once upon a time, being able to "edit" was enough to support a decent career.

Today, not so much.

"Editing" purely as a skill, is decreasing as a differentiator in securing an income stream because so many people have the basic skill.

Are they all Pro quality? Decidedly no. But they all know how to do the tasks, so they all can potentially nibble away at the stream of video creation need. And that fact is helping depress wages in our industry, overall.

It's not enough now to just "make video." At least not if you seek to monetize the skill without sharing too much of the financial results.

And that means elevating skills other than just "editing" to your mix.

X elevated database management and agile versioning export compared to Legacy within the software.

I think there were pretty sound reasons for that.

So those are the things I'm concentrating on these days - improving my skills "surrounding" the video - rather than just the skills for making the video itself.

FWIW.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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David Lawrence
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 8:45:11 pm

[Bret Williams] "It was all pretty acceptable until iCal. I think that pushed it over the edge. Books still reside on bookshelves and they still look like books. Mail still comes in an envelope to everyones house. A camera still looks like a camera. Icons and images are used everywhere everyday to help us understand the point of something before we read it. Heck, that's the difference between TV and radio. Sure someone could tell us or describe something, but we grasp quicker through a combination of sound and visual. "

Agree that iCal was where Apple jumped the shark with skeuomorphism. I don't think the problem is the use of icons and imagery as much as the OCD emphasis on literalism. On a touch-based system, there's a certain rational for it but as it starts bleeding into the design of desktop software, I think it's problematic.

In terms of design, it's also remarkably conservative for a company as innovative as Apple.

Weirdly enough, Microsoft seems to be leading design innovation in software these days. On a mobile device, the Metro UI is beautiful, functional, and wholly innovative. Have you tried Photosynth for iOS? It's amazing. I guess being the new underdog is making them try harder.

In many ways, Apple has become the Disney of technology companies -- massively popular, massively successful, extremely high quality, but very conservative in conceptual design of their mass market software products.

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David Lawrence
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Oliver Peters
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 13, 2012 at 11:38:04 pm

[David Lawrence] "Weirdly enough, Microsoft seems to be leading design innovation in software these days. "

Design is a touchy thing. Interesting how Apple moved away from the candy look of earlier OS X versions to a more streamlined appearance in the OS. Almost too plain. Funny, too, that Microsoft seems to have abandoned the whole Aero style. I guess both companies realized what GPU hogs these designs are. Here's an interesting approach to a Linux distro that's intended to make Windows users comfortable:

http://zorin-os.com/index.html

And, of course Ubunty:

http://www.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/features

I personally like the skin that you can get for Windows running under Parallels. It mimics OS X icons, but actually looks a bit more appealing. Speaking of which, I really miss the skins and themes that used to exist for OS 9. Obviously Apple is never in favor of user choice when it comes to look and feel.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
Orlando, FL
http://www.oliverpeters.com


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Bret Williams
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 14, 2012 at 2:49:07 am

Well, Steve wasn't. I came to realize that OS X was Steve's baby and the skins weren't coming back.


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Jeremy Garchow
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 14, 2012 at 3:30:20 am

[David Lawrence] "Agree that iCal was where Apple jumped the shark with skeuomorphism. I don't think the problem is the use of icons and imagery as much as the OCD emphasis on literalism. On a touch-based system, there's a certain rational for it but as it starts bleeding into the design of desktop software, I think it's problematic.
"


On the complete flip side of that.

I helped a buddy setup an Apple Airport. He had an iPhone for a while, but had been all PC for his entire life. He's very smart and perceptive, but not interested in how computers work and what it takes to make them run or work to their potential.

His co-worker had bought an iMac and raved about it. Not to be outdone, my buddy bought a Macbook.

He watched while I worked and was asking questions, so it became a bit of a tutorial of sorts. When it came to tell him about going to the system preferences to get in to the network settings (the icon with the gears), he immediately said "Oh, that's just like the iPhone", and then it hit me. I usually go to system preferences through the apple menu and didn't think about the settings icon, but, Yes, it is just like the iPhone. He sat down and did the work while I watched him. It was like once he saw that icon, he suddenly knew what he was doing.

So while I whole heartedly agree, the 'skeuomorphism' isn't the pinnacle of agency level high design, there's a bit of similarity between the differing Mac platform interfaces for the applications that are similar that are instantly legible, and obviously that must be working. There are a lot of people for which a Mac is a brand new experience. This means that if I have owned an iPhone (or iPad), I can pick up a Mac after been a PC person my whole life and "see" my way to the settings. Or the address book. Or the calendar. Or Safari. Those things are pretty important features for every day people. There is a level of logic there that I can relate to.

(And according to Business Insider that is the magic 'poofing' halo effect mentioned by the article if the iPhone 5 doesn't completely rearrange people's brain cells.)

Now, perhaps the average consumer is smarter than that these days and they don't need those visual cues as much they used to. My guess is Apple has all those numbers (first time Mac users, first time iOS users, iOS to Mac users, iOS and Windows users, etc) and perhaps makes design decisions accordingly? I don't know.

I do think the Address Book could work a lot better. To me, if I need a phone number, it's easier to simply hit command-space, type in the contact name, and hit enter once spotlight finds it, but I like that type of thing and most importantly I know how to do it and a new Mac customer might not. Spotlight is also I how I launch some applications. Perhaps 'iOS only' users find the Launchpad more familiar when approaching a Mac for the first time, and some use the dock or the Finder. To each their own, they are all there and appeal to many many different types of users and methods.

So, that brings us to FCPX. After all, this is the 'FCPX or not' forum and all roads lead to mecca.

There is one aspect of the design of FCP that I find rather remarkable and that is the keyboard shortcut editor. It has helped me to somehow learn more about this new timeline metaphor, and I can't quite explain how. There are some holes (big ones) but a decent amount of the fundamental mechanics of editing are keyboard accessible in a way that is somehow "smarter" than the FCP of old. I have to touch the mouse MUCH less in FCPX than I do in FCP7. I have learned more about the curious FCPX timeline from the keyboard shortcut editor than most see/say tutorials I've watched.

Someone spent a lot of time on it. It really works well and is very easy to use. It's a "feature" that not very many people talk about as it doesn't help us edit any faster. But in a way, it has helped me edit faster in X through a more broad understanding of the program.

So while the skeuomorphism might not be for everyone, I think there's a hint of logic behind it even if it it's a tad outdated. And if the keyboard shortcut editor is an example new skeuomorphic Apple design, then perhaps my brain cells might just rearrange.

Also, these guys say Windows 8 is almost not terrible. ;)







Jeremy


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David Lawrence
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 14, 2012 at 5:27:00 am

[Jeremy Garchow] "To me, if I need a phone number, it's easier to simply hit command-space, type in the contact name, and hit enter once spotlight finds it"

I never tried that before. Fantastic tip, thank you!

[Jeremy Garchow] "So while the skeuomorphism might not be for everyone, I think there's a hint of logic behind it even if it it's a tad outdated. And if the keyboard shortcut editor is an example new skeuomorphic Apple design, then perhaps my brain cells might just rearrange."

I don't think the keyboard shortcut editor is the kind of skeuomorphism anyone's complaining about. I agree with you that it's excellent design (Adobe could learn a thing or two from it).

The problem with skeuomorphism isn't the use of graphics, it's the use of inappropriate graphics that serve no purpose other than ornament. The FCPX keyboard shortcut editor works because the keyboard image is appropriate and functional. The iCal Corinthian Leather serves no use whatsoever. It's visual garbage.

[Jeremy Garchow] "Also, these guys say Windows 8 is almost not terrible. ;)"

They really like their Start Bar, don't they? ;)

Looks like Win 8 is a mess on the desktop, but the Metro UI on a nice smartphone like the Nokia Lumia 900 is really pretty sweet. Much nicer than Android to my taste. If I wasn't so invested in the iOS ecosystem, I would definitely consider it.

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David Lawrence
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Jeremy Garchow
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 14, 2012 at 2:36:13 pm

[David Lawrence] "The problem with skeuomorphism isn't the use of graphics, it's the use of inappropriate graphics that serve no purpose other than ornament. The FCPX keyboard shortcut editor works because the keyboard image is appropriate and functional. The iCal Corinthian Leather serves no use whatsoever. It's visual garbage."

I totally here you. It's not the best looking ornament.

But, that being said, it does work and is instantly legible. I do think it could be changed. Is it the same in mountain lion? Haven't seen it yet.

Functionally, what I do like about the desktop calendar is adding a new event. I don't have to find the date, right click, and add it, I simpy hit command-n type it in, add a time, and add the title. It works really well, but I don't mind having to type all that in.


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Bret Williams
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 16, 2012 at 2:47:06 am

I can't understand the FCP X shortcut editor at all. What am I missing? I mean, I can figure it out, but it's not at all logical to me. I understood Legacys shortcut editor from the instant it was introduced. Spoof much better than Avids was too.


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Jeremy Garchow
Re: i-aPPLE
on Sep 16, 2012 at 6:53:40 am

[Bret Williams] ". I understood Legacys shortcut editor from the instant it was introduced"

You mean the button editor?

Is it because you knew the terms to search for?

What can't you find in X? Granted, there are different terms to search for, but that doesn't mean you can't meander your way around through a couple of different ways. It's the FCPX index and glossary that happens to manage the keyboard layout.


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