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Danny Finch
Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 12:31:18 pm

I produce about a half-dozen projects a year (everything in-house) at my company. I'm using a 5-year old MacBook Pro and FCP Studio 5. The system is still rock solid, but I'm headed toward more HD projects and want to do more with motion graphics. Wondering if it makes sense at this point to migrate to Premiere/After Effects. I've been reading more and more that it's a pretty seemless transition.

Any thoughts would be appreciated!


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Eric Santiago
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 1:22:20 pm

Sounds like your heading that way anyway since you want to do more Motion Design.
We use AE for that but across different NLE depending on situation or who is finishing.


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Gary Huff
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 2:02:16 pm

[Danny Finch] "The system is still rock solid, but I'm headed toward more HD projects and want to do more with motion graphics. Wondering if it makes sense at this point to migrate to Premiere/After Effects. I've been reading more and more that it's a pretty seemless transition."

Are you planning on working with formats outside of ProRes/DVCPRO HD? At this point, if FCP Studio 5 is working fine for you, and you will primarily be working with HD formats that are compatible, I think I would recommend buying a cheap, used copy of After Effects and calling it a day.

That said, I've been a big Premiere/After Effects fan for a while, and CS6 is quite a substantial improvement.


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Danny Finch
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 2:19:32 pm

Thanks for the input. Since our budget is still a little tight these days I'm thinking $299 for the jump to FCPX and another $49 for Motion may be more practical in the end.

Which leads me to another question - I don't see much evidence of production companies using Motion over AE. Has it never quite caught on in the profession?


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Gary Hazen
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 2:33:18 pm

[Danny Finch] "Has it never quite caught on in the profession?"

Never had a chance. It's not cross platform and AE had long secured it's dominance as the tool of choice for motion graphics long before motion arrived on the market.


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Steve Connor
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 2:38:02 pm

[Gary Hazen] "Never had a chance. It's not cross platform and AE had long secured it's dominance as the tool of choice for motion graphics long before motion arrived on the market."

However that doesn't mean it's not very good - it is and IMO easier to start working with than AE. No roundtripping with FCPX is a major pain though.

Steve Connor
"The ripple command is just a workaround for not having a magnetic timelinel"
Adrenalin Television


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Paul Jay
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 2:52:47 pm

You will need new hardware anyway. Any new iMac or MBP will run both.


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Gary Huff
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 3:11:07 pm

[Danny Finch] "Thanks for the input. Since our budget is still a little tight these days I'm thinking $299 for the jump to FCPX and another $49 for Motion may be more practical in the end."

You'd still probably need new hardware to really be happy with the performance of FCPX though.


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Walter Soyka
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 3:51:02 pm

[Danny Finch] "I don't see much evidence of production companies using Motion over AE. Has it never quite caught on in the profession?"

Motion is very capable, but I think its ceiling is lower than After Effects's.

I often say that it's faster and easier to get from 0-80% in Motion than AE, but it's faster and easier to get from 0-100% in AE.

The big minuses of Motion for advanced motion graphics (in my opinion) are the lack of expressions and scripting, the lack of third-party plugins, the lack of resolution independence, and the lack of available talent pool.

With regard to FCPX/M5, the lack of roundtrip (Send to Motion) is frustrating from an effects standpoint.

On the plus side, though, publishing from M5 to FCPX is very cool, Motion's behaviors may be easier to understand than keyframing (and Motion still gives you the option to keyframe if you choose), and you can do a good amount of work with realtime rendering on the GPU.

Personally, having used both a good bit, I eventually settled into using Motion predominantly as a titler with all bigger mograph projects going to AE.

Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


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Craig Seeman
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 3:16:20 pm

If everything is really in house then what other people use may be less important. Maybe even more so if you're not hiring freelancers (then what they know is important).
Things like learning curve and ease of use might be more important.
Motion might get you there faster and easier than AE assuming there aren't AE specific features you need/want.

You also may want to compare Adobe's subscription model vs FCPX/Motion App Store model. Both have a low cost of entry although Adobe might have a higher long term cost, especially since ending the subscription might mean ending access to project files. You could buy upfront though at a higher cost. How each product is licensed to multiple workstations might be a factor to consider.

As an FCP user you may find that FCPX actually has a steeper learning curve that PPro. On the other hand, for simpler projects such as interview, B-Roll, Motion FX you may find it faster.



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Danny Finch
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 3:28:08 pm

All great advice and answers to lots of questions. I work for a national firm and other offices (who do way less complex projects than I do) have been given PC's/Adobe Production Premium CS5. I'm the lone wolf as the ONLY Mac video editor in a very PC-centric corporate environment. The fact that my Macbook Pro is still running strong after 5 years is proof of why the Mac is the professional standard.


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Walter Soyka
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 4:02:44 pm

[Danny Finch] "The fact that my Macbook Pro is still running strong after 5 years is proof of why the Mac is the professional standard."

Danny, I would have agreed with you a year ago, but this line doesn't fly with me anymore.

I started using a PC as my main workstation (alongside the seven Macs in my office) about nine months ago. Windows 7 running on quality hardware is a great user experience, with the stability, security, and build quality that I was used to coming from Macs. PCs offer far more performance options than Macs do -- and that's critical for render-intensive work like motion graphics and 3D.

Notably with CS6, there are more graphics cards formally supported on the PC platform than the Mac platform, and that makes a huge performance difference for GPU accelerated features.

I am happily bouncing back and forth all day between my Mac Book Pro and the Z800 HP sent me to try in cross-platform workflows. I liked it enough that I have bought additional HP desktops as the basis for my render garden (it's still too small to be considered a farm).

Macs and PCs each have some unique advantages -- and I do believe that not all PCs are created equal -- but you really can do quality creative work on either platform. I wouldn't consider either platform to be more or less professional than the other as a general rule.

Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


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alban egger
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 6:26:58 pm

[Walter Soyka] "[Danny Finch] "The fact that my Macbook Pro is still running strong after 5 years is proof of why the Mac is the professional standard."

Danny, I would have agreed with you a year ago, but this line doesn't fly with me anymore."


Sorry, Walter, but he talks 5 years, not several months.
I have both in my environment with different tasks (complete live-streaming setup and digital signage via Windows, Production via OSX) and there is no doubt Apple machines and OSX are better for professional work. There is practically no downtime, there are no driver-issues, there is no servicing. They just work. And whatever machine you build for your Windows....there will be the day when some software doesn´t support your graphics-card driver....you upgrade and mess with another program which needs the old one.....it just happens much more often Windows than in Mac (due to the fact that Mac hardware is indeed only limited in terms of new cards/main boards etc)



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Shawn Miller
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 6:48:07 pm

[alban egger] "Sorry, Walter, but he talks 5 years, not several months.
I have both in my environment with different tasks (complete live-streaming setup and digital signage via Windows, Production via OSX) and there is no doubt Apple machines and OSX are better for professional work. There is practically no downtime, there are no driver-issues, there is no servicing. They just work. And whatever machine you build for your Windows....there will be the day when some software doesn´t support your graphics-card driver....you upgrade and mess with another program which needs the old one.....it just happens much more often Windows than in Mac (due to the fact that Mac hardware is indeed only limited in terms of new cards/main boards etc)"


Sorry to disagree with your disagreement here, Alban. But this is not my experience with Windows PCs at all. I currently have two 7 year old Dell workstations in my care. Each still performing well, and each only going down for OS/software updates. I also have an 8 year old Windows Server 2003 machine in my care, it also goes down for system maintenance from time to time, but nothing like you're describing. I have had problem PCs to be sure, but in those cases cheap/bad components and crappy drivers were to blame.

Shawn



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Herb Sevush
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 7:34:18 pm

[alban egger] "there is no doubt Apple machines and OSX are better for professional work. There is practically no downtime, there are no driver-issues, there is no servicing."

I'd like to live on your planet. On mine, however, after 3 Mac Pros a MBP and a mini, I would say hardware downtime is no better than HP or Dell, and hardware options are much more constrained. OSX software issues are fewer, especially viruses, but in order to get that stability you have way, way, way fewer software options. Pick your poison, it's all pretty much equal. Except I do like color labeling my files - take note Microsoft.

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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Gary Huff
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 10:13:20 pm

[Herb Sevush] "I'd like to live on your planet. On mine, however, after 3 Mac Pros a MBP and a mini, I would say hardware downtime is no better than HP or Dell, and hardware options are much more constrained. OSX software issues are fewer, especially viruses, but in order to get that stability you have way, way, way fewer software options. Pick your poison, it's all pretty much equal. Except I do like color labeling my files - take note Microsoft."

I've been PC since the dawn of my computing experience and a Mac for a year and a half now, and I agree as well.


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Walter Soyka
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 7:49:27 pm

[alban egger] "Sorry, Walter, but he talks 5 years, not several months."

I assume that you would reject this argument if I made it in favor of FCP7 over FCPX.

I've been doing my daily creative work on Macs for 10 years, and I've been doing specialty display work on PCs in my shop for 6 years. This is not my first PC, but it is the first time I've relied on a PC as my daily workstation. Nine months using Windows 7 as my daily driver is certainly enough for me to say that the experience is so vastly different than XP that my own prior preconceptions are simply invalid.

This machine still feels the same as it did the day I started -- just like you'd expect from a Mac. I'm not updating drivers every day, I'm not opening it up and tinkering around. I'm focusing on my work, and the computer is helping get it done while staying out of my way -- just like you'd expect from a Mac.



[alban egger] "I have both in my environment with different tasks (complete live-streaming setup and digital signage via Windows, Production via OSX) and there is no doubt Apple machines and OSX are better for professional work."

No doubt? Those are very strong words. I wouldn't make such a strong statement with no qualifications.

If you care about power, which is an advantage in high-end motion graphics, then Macs lose. The fastest Mac you can buy today is built on technology from the first quarter of 2011, and it's half as fast as the fastest PC you can buy today [link].

Why is power an advantage? Schedules and budgets are fixed. The more you can render within that time/budget, the more time you have for development and experimentation. The faster you get results back from your machine, the more creative iterations you can perform in the same amount of time, and the better final result you can deliver to your client.



[alban egger] "And whatever machine you build for your Windows....there will be the day when some software doesn´t support your graphics-card driver....you upgrade and mess with another program which needs the old one.....it just happens much more often Windows than in Mac (due to the fact that Mac hardware is indeed only limited in terms of new cards/main boards etc)"

In 10 years of running my business on Macs, I've collected some nasty horror stories. Remember the iTunes 2 update that erased connected external drives? Or the QuickTime update designed to allow movie rentals for iTunes that broke all After Effects renders that took longer to calculate than 10 minutes? Or the 10.6.7 update that wouldn't boot if you had an NVIDIA Quadro 4000 installed? All that stuff isn't supposed to happen, because the Mac ecosystem is single-source -- and yet things fall through the cracks.

Computers are complicated. Macs and PCs are both complicated. They will fail at some point. With a professional PC workstation, I can buy a support contract that will have an IT support professional in my office within a day. With a Mac Pro, I can lug it through the local shopping mall to an Apple store so they can confirm it doesn't work, ship it out for repair, and get it back a few days later.



[alban egger] "There is practically no downtime, there are no driver-issues, there is no servicing. They just work."

This describes my experience with Windows 7, too.

I'm not advocating everyone dump Apple and jump on a Windows machine. I love my Macs, I still use them every day, I'm keeping them, and I'll certainly buy more in the future.

I am suggesting that anyone who claim that Macs are absolutely "better for professional work" either have a limited scope of what professional work entails or have some incorrect preconceptions regarding working with a PC.

If you replace "Mac" with "FCP7" and "PC" with "FCPX" in the line above, I think my argument will sound familiar to you.

Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


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alban egger
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 27, 2012 at 8:11:52 am

Haha....I was afraid I would break loose a Win-OSX discussion.
Again, my experience is on Windows machines I have more downtime. It is true Macs are not the fastest machines technically, but in the process of a year´s-production it is in MY environment more effective to run Macs.
Limitations in hardware or software don´t bother me as long as the software I need runs on a Mac.
Let´s end this Win-Mac discussion. The OP wants to know about PP6.



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Walter Soyka
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 27, 2012 at 1:45:52 pm

[alban egger] "Let´s end this Win-Mac discussion. The OP wants to know about PP6."

Danny originally said he wanted to head toward HD and do more with motion graphics.

His laptop is 5 years old; that's fine for SD editorial, but won't cut it anymore for HD editorial or graphics. He must replace his system anyway, so since he is considering an Adobe workflow, PCs are a new option that he didn't have before. With apps like Premiere Pro and After Effects which are able to use as much processing power as you can provide them and leverage modern NVIDIA graphics cards for improved performance, they're worth talking about.

"The person who says something is impossible should not interrupt the person who is doing it." There are a handful of people on this forum, such as yourself, Alban, who are showing that FCPX is a serious option for professional use -- over the objections of the many who have not tried it.

My intent here is not to start any flame war about computer platform, but rather to share my own experience with "the impossible" -- daily creative work on the PC platform. As a long time Mac die-hard, the fact that I'm working happily and very productively on PCs now, too, is shocking to folks who know me.

There are certainly reasons for Danny not to switch to a PC. There's the whole Apple Mac/iPhone/iCloud ecosystem, there's his minimum of five years of familiarity with the platform, there's unique, innovative, Apple-only software like FCPX.

There are also things to dislike about Windows. I don't like the menu bar at the top of the window instead of the top of the screen (Fitt's Law and all). I think drive letters are bonkers in 2012. Some of the control panel layouts are more or less arranged like they were in Windows 3.1, so they're functional but require a couple clicks more than the better-designed Mac equivalents. There's the fact that it's not UNIX under the hood so all those cool command-line tools and knowledge of system internals don't transfer.

Mainly, just as with FCP7/Pr/FCPX, there's a slightly different way of thinking to learn before Windows makes sense. Some concepts have different names, and some similar things are in different places.

My argument is that most of the traditional Mac-user reasons not to use Windows (cheap, poorly built machines, system instability, poor system security, the need for an IT degree and constant tweaking of system internals to keep the computer running) are outdated and do not apply to Windows 7 running on workstation-grade hardware.

I haven't had to tweak my BIOS. High-end systems don't come pre-loaded with all the lousy shovelware common on lower-end Windows systems that increase boot times and sap system performance and reliability. The build quality is marvelous, and the Z-series internals are actually better-designed than a Mac Pro's. My system is connected 24/7 to the Internet, but Windows 7's security model is totally overhauled compared with XP, and Microsoft Security Essentials (a free download) is sufficient; meanwhile, Mac threats are on the rise, and Apple (declared "10 years behind Microsoft on security" by one security firm) has had to improve security in Mountain Lion, too.

Whether you're on a PC or a Mac, having a cloned system drive ready to go in case of a disastrous update or crash is a good idea. In fact, it's absolutely nonsensical not to have one. You don't want to spend any time futzing with settings trying to get the system working on either platform. You just boot from the spare and go about your work so you don't miss deadlines.

Whether you're on a PC or a Mac, you'll have to be careful not to install too many applications that automatically start with the computer to avoid possible gradual degradation of performance that people tend to associate only with PCs. On a PC, it's actually easier to uninstall an application like this because any application can be uninstalled from the same control panel.

Whether you're on a PC or a Mac, you'll need to download the latest drivers from NVIDIA for best performance with Pr CS6; on a Mac, you actually even need two separate driver downloads (one for graphics, one for CUDA).

I am only suggesting that Danny consider the strengths and weaknesses of all his options as he makes his choice, so I'm presenting the strengths and weaknesses of the PC platform (and trying to debunk some of what are falsely considered weaknesses) for consideration.

Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


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Gary Huff
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 27, 2012 at 2:46:41 pm

[Walter Soyka] "My intent here is not to start any flame war about computer platform, but rather to share my own experience with "the impossible" -- daily creative work on the PC platform."

I find it amusing the way you phrased this. My first thought was, "I've been doing the impossible since 1999 and I didn't even realize it?!?!"

[Walter Soyka] "I am only suggesting that Danny consider the strengths and weaknesses of all his options as he makes his choice, so I'm presenting the strengths and weaknesses of the PC platform (and trying to debunk some of what are falsely considered weaknesses) for consideration."

Absolutely. Both Windows/OSX are incredibly viable platforms for doing creative work, each has their pluses and minuses.


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Shawn Miller
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 27, 2012 at 3:42:18 pm

[Gary Huff] "I find it amusing the way you phrased this. My first thought was, "I've been doing the impossible since 1999 and I didn't even realize it?!?!""

lol - I had the same thought. I've also been doing creative work on Windows since the WinNT days.

[Walter Soyka] "I am only suggesting that Danny consider the strengths and weaknesses of all his options as he makes his choice, so I'm presenting the strengths and weaknesses of the PC platform (and trying to debunk some of what are falsely considered weaknesses) for consideration."

I think Walter hits the nail on the head here (as usual). Windows isn't perfect by any stretch, but the PC universe offers some great rewards for those who are willing to do some reseach and keep an open mind. Best of all, you can still run as many Macs as you want, it doesn't have to be an all or nothing proposition.

Shawn



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Gary Huff
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 27, 2012 at 5:10:41 pm

[Shawn Miller] "Best of all, you can still run as many Macs as you want, it doesn't have to be an all or nothing proposition."

Exactly. I routinely switch between a custom built desktop Windows system and my MacBook Pro with no problems.


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Walter Soyka
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 3:30:26 pm

[Craig Seeman] "You also may want to compare Adobe's subscription model vs FCPX/Motion App Store model. Both have a low cost of entry although Adobe might have a higher long term cost, especially since ending the subscription might mean ending access to project files. You could buy upfront though at a higher cost. How each product is licensed to multiple workstations might be a factor to consider."

More specifically, you can subscribe to Adobe's Creative Cloud service and get all the CS6 desktop apps to run locally on your own computer for $50/mo.

http://www.adobe.com/products/creativecloud.html

Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


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Shawn Miller
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 6:27:09 pm

I think another thing to consider about AE, is its scalability. People are doing everything from simple motion graphics to complex, high end visual effects in AE. Not to denigrate Motion at all, I wish it were available on the PC. But you may want to think beyond what you're being asked to do today, and consider how far you want to go in the future. Maybe Motion gets you as far as you care to go, maybe not. Either way, it probably deserves some thought.

Shawn



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Lance Bachelder
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 7:54:51 pm

Why does the decision always have to be Premiere/After Effects or FCPX/Motion? Why not FCPX/After Effects or Premiere/Motion?

Of course if you have CS6 suite you get Premiere anyways so why not Premiere/AE/FCPX/Motion and use whatever fits the job/budget/timeframe etc?

Lance Bachelder
Writer, Editor, Director
Irvine, California



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Steve Connor
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 7:58:54 pm

[Lance Bachelder] "Of course if you have CS6 suite you get Premiere anyways so why not Premiere/AE/FCPX/Motion and use whatever fits the job/budget/timeframe etc?
"


Very sensible idea, that's exactly what I do

Steve Connor
"The ripple command is just a workaround for not having a magnetic timelinel"
Adrenalin Television


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Eric Santiago
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 10:56:53 pm

We can all argue this PC vs Mac thing forever.
I for one have way too many years with both and have to side on the Apple part for creative.
I use Windows for 3D and Digital Signage/Touch Screen projects.
For 3D, our DELL/BOXX systems have started to show its age after only 2 years.
For Digital Signage/Touch Screen...horrendous in so many levels.
The good thing is that its deemed as a player and not mission critical for creative.
Now since we are on the subject of creative options, Macs have outlasted our PCs in so many ways.
Is it my fault? Maybe Im not geek enough to tweak the BIOS?
The fact that I dont have to deal with that on the Apple side of things is enough to make me stick with the Mac.


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Gary Huff
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 26, 2012 at 11:49:04 pm

[Eric Santiago] "Now since we are on the subject of creative options, Macs have outlasted our PCs in so many ways."

That's great! I'm still on the Windows desktop I built back in 2005.


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David Cherniack
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 27, 2012 at 4:28:26 am

These days anyone who argues the superiority of macs over pcs or vice versa is either a fan boy or a moron. Take your pick. Of course, the two are not mutually exclusive.

David
AllinOneFilms.com


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Joseph W. Bourke
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 27, 2012 at 2:23:28 pm

I'm with you David - they're both a tool to do a job. You like the Mac? Use it. You prefere the PC? Use that. How about using both for their strengths? I'm writing this on my 7 year old PC, and it's still running like a champ! That doesn't make it better or worse than a Mac - it's just working.

I don't trust evangalists for either platform; they're usually just trying to pick your pocket.

Joe Bourke
Owner/Creative Director
Bourke Media
http://www.bourkemedia.com


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Gary Huff
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 27, 2012 at 2:47:44 pm

[Joseph W. Bourke] "I don't trust evangalists for either platform; they're usually just trying to pick your pocket."

I just hate the snide asides, usually dropping in some technical term being used in the wrong context to boot.

To be fair, I hear this far more from the Apple fanboys than the Windows fanboys.


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Eric Santiago
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 27, 2012 at 10:33:36 pm

[Gary Huff] "To be fair, I hear this far more from the Apple fanboys than the Windows fanboys."
Funny I hear this far more with everyone that hates Apple period.
No worries I dont take sides on these subjects just from my own experience.
Sadly its not like that with everyone.
I have friends and colleagues that dont share the same views as me and have witnessed both platforms frailties.
I dont take sides when trying to help other fix their issues.
Doesnt do me any good since I too use both platforms day to day.

Just tools folks just tools :)


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Richard Jacana
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 27, 2012 at 11:42:08 pm

Download the trial, give it a whirl. If you switch you may as well run windoze 7 and get an HP workstation because yes, that'll give you the most bang for the buck. I still think it's easier for a one person show to run a mac, Windows 7 just takes more work to setup (my mac mini vs my two windows 7 laptos with Windows Enterprise), drivers etc but you may be lucking and if you have an IT dept then go for it.

I have both PP5.5 and FCPx and for what I do FCPx is a lot easier to use - interface is way cleanser and the organization of footage is years ahead of Adobe but sure there is a lot missing for pros. If I were a major edit house I would be still using what I had FPC 7 or PP5.5 - no big company jumps on the latest of greatest. Use what works best for you.

I love it when folks get into a pissing match about the whole Premiere Pro vs FCPx thing, makes for a great read. Apple is about making money and the pro market is insignificant compared to iPhones and iPads, just remember that. Apple is not your friend, neither is Adobe remember that - what ever they say and how much candy they offer you, they are out to make $$$ - pick what works best for you.


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Gary Huff
Re: Deciding whether to swith to PremierePro CS6
on Jul 29, 2012 at 11:45:31 pm

[Richard Jacana] "neither is Adobe remember that"

Curious, because Adobe makes their money by catering to professionals, unlike Apple.


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