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Now it's the turn of the Photographers

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Steve Connor
Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 11:44:53 am

http://www.macworld.co.uk/mac-creative/news/?newsid=3364540

Steve Connor
"The ripple command is just a workaround for not having a magnetic timelinel"
Adrenalin Television


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Andrew Richards
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 12:50:47 pm

Wow, now we only need to hear the exact same list of grievances from the Logic guys and we'll have a trifecta.

From the article:

"Writing for Photofocus, Scott Bourne notes that while he is intending to buy a MacBook Pro with Retina display he has a number of concerns."


That'll show 'em. I'll buy it, but I'm also going to write a sternly worded letter about it!

Best,
Andy


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Mark Bein
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 6:36:20 pm

The Bourne Ultimatum!


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Craig Seeman
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 1:19:01 pm

It looks like MacrworldUK no longer has "professional" writers.
I can't believe that's the writing of a professional photographer. It looks like a Twitter feed cut and paste from a wannabe.



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Gary Huff
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 1:39:41 pm

[Craig Seeman] "I can't believe that's the writing of a professional photographer. It looks like a Twitter feed cut and paste from a wannabe."

The original article is here. Shame on them for not including a link in the piece.


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Andrew Richards
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 2:09:28 pm

[Gary Huff] "Shame on them for not including a link in the piece."

Shame indeed! I assumed it must be a print-only piece with no link present. Bad form, MarcWorld!

Best,
Andy


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Craig Seeman
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 2:10:04 pm

Better but I think there's a few wrong assumptions. I won't debate Aperture but the MBPr is decisively targeted towards Pros with each feature set (and price).

While there's compelling arguments for Lightroom over Aperture, that the latter links to iPhoto's library just isn't one of them.



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Mark Bein
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 3:43:49 pm

Thank you. Hilarious!

So Apple delivers the best laptop for a photo guy there has ever been-
a 5 (five) Megapixel IPS Screen laptop.

Scott Bourne:
"Here’s the writing on the wall. Aperture’s library now fully integrates with iPhoto’s library.
Does that ring a bell with anyone but me? iPhoto is a purely consumer product."

Is that all he's got?
What's wrong with that?


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Alan Okey
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 1:28:10 pm

Do any pros even use Aperture? Everyone I know switched to (or started with) Lightroom years ago...


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Kevin Patrick
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 4:32:04 pm

Interesting article. In it, Scott Bourne states that as of today he's moving himself and his staff to Adobe Lightroom 4. His reasons seem odd. The writing on the wall (as he puts it) is the integration with iPhoto's database. I'm not sure why that's an issue. In fact, it seems to at least make sense that both apps can access the same database, if you need it.

He states this is like the Final Cut Pro debacle. This doesn't seem anything like it. Apple didn't just kill off Aperture and replace with a completely new Photo application that uses a completely new methodology along with the inability to open any previous Aperture libraries. (as was the case with FCP) I think making this statement is rather (if not very) misleading.

Apple just released an upgrade to Aperture, version 3.3, not a major release. They added some features, such as painting in white balance. This was new for LR4. In fact, many of the new features Adobe highlights in LR4 were either already in Aperture or were added to the new v3.3 release.

New LR4 Features:
Highlight/Shadow Recovery (Aperture enhanced this existing feature in 3.3)
Photo Book Creation (Already in Aperture 3.x)
Location Based Organization (Already in Aperture 3.x)
Chromatic Aberration (Aperture 3.x)
Extended Video Support (Already in Aperture 3.x)
White Balance Brush (Aperture just added in 3.3)
Emailing Photos (Already in Aperture 3.x)
Online Sharing (Already in Aperture 3.x)

What LR4 Does Not Have:
Retina Display Support: Added in Aperture 3.3
Photo Stream: Support of this is better in Aperture than iPhoto.
Managed Libraries: LR4 is referenced only, Aperture does both as well as mixed.
Faces: Like it or not, it there and it works.
Apple TV: If you use it, Aperture supports it.

It's odd to listen to a Pro Photo person, who is also an Apple user (he notes that he does not want to move to Windows) knock what appears to be a good Apple product. It's why I choose Aperture over LR. I'm not an expert on either of the applications. But it wasn't hard for me to figure out which one to use and why. If you don't know anything about either one and simply read Scott's article, you'd probably take his advice and avoid Aperture. Which is too bad, because Aperture is a great product.


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Gary Huff
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 4:58:37 pm

To be fair, Retina and AppleTV support is dependent on Apple. Do we even know how much of a heads up Adobe got for Retina-display support and does Apple even provide the capability for Adobe to add AppleTV support to Lightroom?


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Kevin Patrick
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 5:50:02 pm

[Gary Huff] "Retina and AppleTV support is dependent on Apple."

So that can or could be an advantage for Aperture users. Perhaps an unfair one. Either way, it's either an advantage for an Aperture user, or you simply have to wait a little longer for LR to catch up. Unless Adobe doesn't even have the necessary access for ATV.

Toss this particular issues aside and I still have an issue with Scott's reasoning/logic for why he's making the switch to LR4. But, that's just my opinion.


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Bill Davis
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 7:16:47 pm

[Kevin Patrick] "The writing on the wall (as he puts it) is the integration with iPhoto's database. I'm not sure why that's an issue. In fact, it seems to at least make sense that both apps can access the same database, if you need it. "

A meme is a meme is a meme.

He's stuck on Aperture is "iPhoto Pro" echoing the moment the first clueless twit decided that X was "iMovie Pro."

The concept survived (for a while) based not much on actual facts, but mostly on the worry and anxiety surrounding the change.

Thankfully, a lot of the video pros here - while understandably concerned at first - stuck with the software long enough to discover what is actually possible with it - and some of us figured out that the meme was actually nothing more than a cute sounding red herring.

Here we are a year later - with lots and lots of very smart professionals with widely divergent points of view still wrestling with the software that was originally derided as "dumbed down."

My POV is well know here. The X rebuild was undertaken because computing was changing, global information flow was changing, "search" was ascendent, and a new tool was needed for the realities of the dawning era of connected content.

Now some of the photo guys are awakening to the same new world.

With rare exceptions, the value of any one photo is diminishing - while the value of functional access to huge global storehouses of content is increasing.

That's the disruptive fact.

And it's just as true of stills as it is of video.

FWIW.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Kevin Patrick
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 8:46:14 pm

I think most of the people (at least here on the Cow) who have issues with FCPX can provide some tangible, objective and understandable reasons why FCPX does not work for them.

That does not see to be the case with Scott's review of Aperture 3.3.

Which is a shame, since he has a blog where he talks about important issues to photographers, just like this particular one. A blog where some probably read what he has to say and make use of his professional opinion.


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Bill Davis
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 11:29:27 pm

[Kevin Patrick] "I think most of the people (at least here on the Cow) who have issues with FCPX can provide some tangible, objective and understandable reasons why FCPX does not work for them. "

Absolutely,

And if your sole concern is a tool to work with today, I agree there are plenty of editors for whom it works great - and plenty for whom the tool just doesn't fit.

What seems more important to me, tho is how the tool has changed my thinking about editing. I'm less tied to my desk. More aware of the importance of data management, and more aware of how media distribution is changing.

Those things have all increased in importance to me since I had to confront Apples vision of how many types of modern editing could improve as expressed in FCP-X.

So the real play - at least for me - is that X has helped me change my thinking.

I suspect that others will make their similar journeys while focused on other tools.

But this particular one has simply been a strong catalyst for me.

Apple did something different with X. And seeing that encouraged me to take a look at how I might benefit from approaching editing tasks from a new perspective as well.

Simple as that.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 11:47:44 pm

[Bill Davis] "With rare exceptions, the value of any one photo is diminishing - while the value of functional access to huge global storehouses of content is increasing. That's the disruptive fact."

Bill,

I'm not sure how you're squaring the "values" of the first part with the "fact" of the second part.

Franz.


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Bill Davis
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 19, 2012 at 12:49:24 am

[Franz Bieberkopf] "[Bill Davis] "With rare exceptions, the value of any one photo is diminishing - while the value of functional access to huge global storehouses of content is increasing. That's the disruptive fact."

Bill,

I'm not sure how you're squaring the "values" of the first part with the "fact" of the second part.

Franz."


Simple.

We do quite a bit of image licensing from Stock Photo houses.

Once upon a time, if the only photo available from the stock photo houses we had accounts with was close to what we needed - but perhaps "rights managed" - and therefore more expensive, we'd consider it.

Today, with access to literally tens of millions of photos on-line, the chances of needing to pop for that more expensive photo is massively reduced.

In that way, cloud access to vast libraries of photographs has diminished the value of the individual photo. Scarcity is, after all, one of the original drivers of value. And it's pretty much disappeared in the area of general digital photography.

OTOH, more individuals than ever can benefit from using images since vastly higher percentage of computer using individuals have the ability to do useful page composition. The iTunes model essentially was built on this concept in the music space. Serious money made with micro-payments and a broad customer base - rather than relying on scarcity and smaller scale customer needs that keep prices high.

My 2 cents, anyway.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Franz Bieberkopf
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 19, 2012 at 1:16:11 am

[Bill Davis] "We do quite a bit of image licensing from Stock Photo houses. ..."

Bill,

I didn't realize you were talking about stock photo prices.

"Value" is a pretty loaded word and "photo" is not generally taken to mean stock images.

I thought you were making a universal statement about images. Though I don't know it from experience, I find it entirely plausible that stock photo prices have come down.

Franz.


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John Davidson
Re: Now it's the turn of the Photographers
on Jun 18, 2012 at 5:45:17 pm

As usual, the best came from the comments section:

"Stop blaming the tools for not developing as a photographer."

John Davidson | President / Creative Director | Magic Feather Inc.


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