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Thomas Frank
Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 12:21:39 pm

http://www.fcproxuniversity.com/FCPro_X_University/Extra_Credit/Entries/201...

This will stir the crowd:
Seriously, any season pro is smart enough to learn FCP X easily with proper training (just like they did way back when for whatever they’ve been using for the past decade), and anyone who says otherwise is either a liar, or really stupid.



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Oliver Peters
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 12:50:45 pm

The question isn't if they CAN learn it. Rather, it's "Why should they?" Apple has yet to give a compelling answer.

Oliver

Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
Orlando, FL
http://www.oliverpeters.com


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Rafael Amador
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 1:02:41 pm

Well, he sais "editing is editing, but if you do not edit with FCPX you are chicken".
Agressive selling techniques.
rafael

http://www.nagavideo.com


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Kevin Patrick
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 2:08:39 pm

Good point. Who said they can't learn it?

Of all the negative opinions I've come across about FCP X, I don't ever recall hearing anyone say they couldn't figure out how to use it.

Some may not like the way things like the Magical Magnetic Timeline work. They understood how it works. They just don't like it.


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ron sussman
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 6:11:39 pm

Perfectly stated by Oliver Peters. End of discussion!


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Joseph W. Bourke
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 2:14:55 pm

I like this quote even better:

"Apple has a system in place in which we can get what used to be major upgrades as free updates, faster and easier than ever before, that no competitor can yet match today. I just don't see Avid or Adobe getting updates out this fast, this easy. But I bet you anything, very soon, you'll see them start to make inroads to this new paradigm, as well as metadata, database centric organizational tools."

AVID and Adobe don't need to get updates out "this fast, this easy" because the updates work. They don't then have to scramble pushing out bug fixes, or adding patches for features they took away, or broke.

Joe Bourke
Owner/Creative Director
Bourke Media
http://www.bourkemedia.com


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Chris Harlan
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 7, 2012 at 1:10:18 am

[Joseph W. Bourke] ""Apple has a system in place in which we can get what used to be major upgrades as free updates, faster and easier than ever before, that no competitor can yet match today. I just don't see Avid or Adobe getting updates out this fast, this easy. But I bet you anything, very soon, you'll see them start to make inroads to this new paradigm, as well as metadata, database centric organizational tools."

AVID and Adobe don't need to get updates out "this fast, this easy" because the updates work. They don't then have to scramble pushing out bug fixes, or adding patches for features they took away, or broke."


And it is more moronic blather, as well. How is going to the iTunes store any faster than downloading a patch? And what on earth does he mean by "what used to be major upgrades as free updates?" That is a crazy statement. Does he think Apple will never do an upgrade? Does he not know that incremental .fixes are almost always free from whoever is releasing them? FCP X University, indeed. Hot Air University, more like. With a major in Bellicosity.


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Daniel Frome
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 2:28:05 pm

Well if it isn't professional, then certainly we wouldn't need a professional to teach it to us ;)


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Herb Sevush
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 2:56:42 pm

Would like to know how both of these statements can work in the same argument.

"all NLE's to date have looked and acted the exact same way from the beginning."

followed soon by

"No tool in any NLE was an “industry standard” because all NLE’s did various things differently with different terms for the tools and processes they used all along, period. There never was any industry standard or professional terminology in NLE’s, ever!"

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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Walter Soyka
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 3:17:58 pm

Here's another set of apparent contradictions. I didn't even have to insert an ellipsis:
"Apple has a system in place in which we can get what used to be major upgrades as free updates, faster and easier than ever before, that no competitor can yet match today. I just don't see Avid or Adobe getting updates out this fast, this easy. But I bet you anything, very soon, you'll see them start to make inroads to this new paradigm, as well as metadata, database centric organizational tools."


Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


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Walter Soyka
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 3:14:29 pm

If the point of Mr. Balser's post were "use what you can to get the result that you need," I would have agreed. Instead, I read it as an dismissive open letter to anyone who hasn't adopted FCPX, and I thought it failed to address some of the legitimate criticisms of FCPX.

I lost him on the first sentence:
"In response to an ongoing and lively discussion about how legitimate FCP X is for different types of editing, let me just say, editing is editing, some productions are short and have few assets, some are long and have tons of assets, but editing is editing, period."

Editing is editing like music is music. Tautologically true, but that doesn't mean orchestral music is comparable to rock and roll from a technical, tools-of-the-trade point of view.

Why would he reject the notion that different types of editing might have different requirements? When cutting narrative, a dedicated source monitor and a responsive dynamic trim mode are strengths. When cutting graphics-heavy pieces, integration with After Effects might be more valuable. When cutting sports highlights, good metadata drives faster results.

What about the differences between cutting the creative edit and finishing it?

Why should we assume that one tool is the best for all possible editorial jobs?



Another stumbling block for me:
"It is that all NLE's to date have looked and acted the exact same way from the beginning, and we almost no longer shoot on film, and even tape is getting more rare, but the terminology and workflows still follow the paradigms of negative cutting, which is outdated and doesn't work for pure digital workflows today."

Maybe he's trying to say that bins/folders are an old organizational tool adopted from film editorial, but he overreaches by a mile with the claim that NLEs follow the paradigm of negative cutting.



Finally:
"Anyone who labels any camera, software, hardware, anything as pro or not-pro has ego issues."

My wife would be the first to remind me that I do in fact have ego issues, but let's not lose sight of the fact that we're talking about a product which its developer has named Final Cut Pro.

Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


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Herb Sevush
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 3:36:54 pm

[Walter Soyka] "he overreaches by a mile with the claim that NLEs follow the paradigm of negative cutting."

My guess is he's never seen negative A&B rolls in his life. The only film metaphor commonly in use with NLE's is that of the "bin." Since film editing was primarily single viewer one could as easily state that FCPX is actually a retro throwback to film editing. One could, but I wouldn't.

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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Michael Aranyshev
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 4:18:24 pm

[Herb Sevush] "The only film metaphor commonly in use with NLE's is that of the "bin." "

True. Uncommonly though, meaning my own posts and conversations with clients and colleagues, I often use constructions like "digital negative" and "digital workprint" and so far I find it making a lot of sense.


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Herb Sevush
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 4:48:45 pm

[Michael Aranyshev] "I often use constructions like "digital negative" and "digital workprint" and so far I find it making a lot of sense."

The reason being that they come from the feature film world, where you are directly replacing a film process with a digital equivalent. To be picky, those are digital workflow expressions, not NLE specific. They make sense when dealing with clients who knew the film equivalents in the first place - there are plenty of corporate clients who wouldn't know what you were talking about.

Herb Sevush
Zebra Productions
---------------------------
nothin' attached to nothin'
"Deciding the spine is the process of editing" F. Bieberkopf


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James Mortner
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 5:39:14 pm

[Walter Soyka] "Why should we assume that one tool is the best for all possible editorial jobs?"

When the gentleman talking is selling training in said tool


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tony west
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 4:37:39 pm

Not really the words I would have used or how I would have phrased that message.

I found the camera part interesting though.

I agree that camera manufactures couldn't care less if you can't play there newest codecs on your old stuff.

They just put out their new stuff and expect you to keep up.

Your P2 player that you spent a lot of jack on can't play the latest codec?

"Too bad, buy another one" seems to be the attitude.

I never really hear people complaining about it. It's just accepted as that's how it is.


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Thomas Frank
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 4:45:17 pm

a course this is a standard business model that even Apple has jumped on.
Remember software is easy to change but having the software and hardware tied in tightly so if you want to update you also have to update the hardware.

like iMovie and Siri it can run on a iPhone 3GS but... if you want buy a new phone.



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Marvin Holdman
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 5:21:15 pm

"I remember the doom of Apple predicted when Steve Jobs ripped floppy disk drives from all new Macs. Yep, I remember those days when I was an IT engineer. "

This statement stuck out to me. Seems like we've got a whole new class of folks in the video business now and they've found their voice. All the "IT" folk who have long hung out with us video "professionals" now seem to have decided that what we do is not longer a "profession". From Ubilios on down, we seem to have plenty of folks from the computer world telling those who have crafted TV that there is "nothing special" about our business.

While I don't disagree that we're certainly moving farther and farther away from professional equipment and professional standards, I have to wonder whether it's a good thing or not. At this point, the confusion created by the industry lead "revolution" might produce more opportunity to sell more equipment, but at the end of the day are we producing more and better products? Seems like the reply by those who embrace the more choices are better option is "it doesn't matter, because more people can access it now". While this may be true, I think of the old adage about 1,000 monkeys being given 1,000 typewriters and still none of them can produce Shakespeare. At the end of the day, it will ALWAYS take time to produce quality TV and I can't help but wonder where many of these Johnny Come Lately's will be in 2 years, once they find out that this TV stuff takes time.

Hope that's not too dismissive, but the blogs like this feel a bit condescending. Especially when they appear to come from someone who is more concerned about simply having more people take up a particular application in order to further their business model (training) rather than giving one moments consideration to whether it is the best move for someone at this moment. Could FCPX evolve into something wonderful? It would appear. Is it there yet? Not really. Still hopeful, but not drinking the kool-aid just yet. (Though I do feel a thirst developing).

Marvin Holdman
Production Manager
Tourist Network
8317 Front Beach Rd, Suite 23
Panama City Beach, Fl
phone 850-234-2773 ext. 128
cell 850-585-9667
skype username - vidmarv


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Thomas Frank
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 7:05:01 pm

I agree with you on the monkeys! Our IT guys are monkeys lol.
Look at YouTube it is full of monkeys and the sad thing is I am starting to see some on Vimeo! :(
But that is okay keep the monkeys coming gives me more opertunities. Unless everybody deside go with the Chinese way of producing fast and cheap.



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Adam White
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 8, 2012 at 11:07:49 pm

I really agree with alot of what you're saying, Marvin.

Technology has and continues to do amazing things, and certainly the advancements of the last decade have opened doors for me personally that would have remained firmly shut before.

But, I get very frustrated and quite frankly exhausted with the agressive and at times downright hostile tone of techies and software developers. FCPX is a case in point. I dont believe the editing community is made up of reluctant dinosaurs but it is made up of people who have a respect for established paradigms and workflows because they have stood the test of time and in many cases enhance, not stifle, creativity. A software designers idea of elegance may very well be an editors idea of hell.

Once again we have an article by someone espousing this supposed revolution, agressively so, who by the looks of things knows precious little and looks to have next to no respect for the editing process. All this stuff about being 'stuck in the past' if your not already praising the wisdom of Saint Ubillos of Apple is such utter clap trap I can barely stomach any more of it. Just because someone wants a viewer and tracks they are antiquated and need to be put out of their misery? Please - these are talented people who will continue to do great work.

This sort of divisive nonsense is perhaps what I dislike about FCPX most of all. These kind of proponents do the software no favours amongst the people that need to be convinced, IMHO.


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Walter Soyka
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 10:58:54 pm

[tony west] "I found the camera part interesting though. I agree that camera manufactures couldn't care less if you can't play there newest codecs on your old stuff. They just put out their new stuff and expect you to keep up. Your P2 player that you spent a lot of jack on can't play the latest codec? "Too bad, buy another one" seems to be the attitude. I never really hear people complaining about it. It's just accepted as that's how it is."

Tony, I hear you here.

However, I think it's worth noting that there are many things about new camera formats that aren't changing as rapidly as the recording codecs: soft things like video standards, file wrappers, and metadata structures, and hard things like HD-SDI out, serial control, the physical recording media itself.

You may need to change out single pieces here and there to add capability, but adherence to (or coalescence around) industry standards means you don't have to re-engineer an entire studio infrastructure or workflow just to use a new record format.

Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


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Richard Herd
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 11:04:49 pm

Cameras changed huge when Red hit the market; effectively, they renamed 4K. Whereas it meant 4,000 lines of each R, G, & B, Red made it 4k across the top, with a CMOS. It caused a lot of discussion.


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Alan Okey
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 5:09:36 pm

This whole FCP X "debate" has grown incredibly tiresome. If you like X, great. Use it. If you don't, great. Use something else. Personally attacking people for what software they choose to use or not to use is childish and unproductive.

Editors who dislike and do not use FCP X are not necessarily old and inflexible. It's not that they "just don't get it," or that they are dinosaurs; they just don't like it, and choose not to use it. By the same token, editors who like and use FCP X are not necessarily any less "professional" if it fits their needs.


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Jim Giberti
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 7:04:34 pm

[Alan Okey] "Editors who dislike and do not use FCP X are not necessarily old and inflexible. It's not that they "just don't get it," or that they are dinosaurs; they just don't like it, and choose not to use it. By the same token, editors who like and use FCP X are not necessarily any less "professional" if it fits their needs."

Perhaps Cow could make this into a carved sign and hang it at the top of the forum.


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John Godwin
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 7:11:44 pm

[Jim Giberti] "[Alan Okey] "Editors who dislike and do not use FCP X are not necessarily old and inflexible. It's not that they "just don't get it," or that they are dinosaurs; they just don't like it, and choose not to use it. By the same token, editors who like and use FCP X are not necessarily any less "professional" if it fits their needs."

Perhaps Cow could make this into a carved sign and hang it at the top of the forum."


Amen.

Best,
John


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TImothy Auld
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 7:39:52 pm

Excellent idea.

Tim


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Chris Harlan
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 10:10:03 pm

[Jim Giberti] "[Alan Okey] "Editors who dislike and do not use FCP X are not necessarily old and inflexible. It's not that they "just don't get it," or that they are dinosaurs; they just don't like it, and choose not to use it. By the same token, editors who like and use FCP X are not necessarily any less "professional" if it fits their needs."

Perhaps Cow could make this into a carved sign and hang it at the top of the forum.
"


I'd sign it.


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 7, 2012 at 4:05:42 pm

[Chris Harlan] "I'd sign it."

Save room for me...

David Roth Weiss
ProMax Systems
Burbank
DRW@ProMax.com
http://www.ProMax.com

David is a Creative COW contributing editor and a forum host of the Apple Final Cut Pro forum.


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Thomas Frank
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 8:09:55 pm

A real Jedi Master has spoken.



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Scott Sheriff
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 9:15:36 pm

[Alan Okey] "By the same token, editors who like and use FCP X are not necessarily any less "professional" if it fits their needs."

I would say there are levels of professionalism. Some more, or less than others. Just like there is a huge difference between the neighborhood handyman, a licensed plumber and and master pipe fitter that is certified for critical work such as nuclear reactors and high pressure boilers.
I see the noobs that can only cut on X as being in the 'neighborhood handyman' category. Certainly adequate for simple jobs, but woefully inadequate and over their head for other jobs and workflows.

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com


"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." ---Red Adair

Where were you on 6/21?


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Thomas Frank
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 9:18:27 pm

Come on a professional means someone makes money is there a different levels of money?
A professional is a person who is paid to undertake a specialised set of tasks and to complete them for a fee. The traditional professions were doctors, lawyers, clergymen, and commissioned military officers. Today, the term is applied to estate agents, surveyors, environmental scientists, forensic scientists, educators, and many more.

Be professional and except the term. ;)



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Shane Ross
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 10:03:36 pm

[Thomas Frank] "Come on a professional means someone makes money is there a different levels of money?"

A wedding videographer makes less than a Feature film DP, or network TV DP. And the level of experience, and equipment needed, is vastly different.

A local commercial editor, or "realty editor," wedding editor makes less than a feature film editor, or network TV editor. And have different NLE needs.

Corporate video even has different levels of pro. The person who edits the simple training video might not be on the same level to edit the high end corporate sales videos. Same with DP. Training videos might still be shot on DV, and can be edited with FCE, Avid DV...most likely with Legacy FCP. HIgh end video, shot with Red, or Arri Alexa, or F900...edited with Avid or Legacy FCP.

Yes...there are different levels of professional. The training video editor might get $100-$300 a day. Feature film editor...$600-$1000 a day. Feature DP vs the training video shooter...yeah, HUGE difference.

Shane
Little Frog Post
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Scott Sheriff
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 11:18:04 pm

[Thomas Frank] "Come on a professional means someone makes money is there a different levels of money?"

Sure there is. Shane pretty much nailed it. Just like there are different levels in quality of professional tools.
I see a huge difference between someone using X on a 15" laptop that is pretty much dedicated to supporting something consumer oriented like a 5D, and someone with a dedicated facility with multiple NLE's, and the I/O options to support whatever walks in the door from VHS to 4K.

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com


"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." ---Red Adair

Where were you on 6/21?


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Thomas Frank
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 7, 2012 at 7:47:19 am

True and its all still Professional right?



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Bill Davis
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 7, 2012 at 5:03:16 pm

[Scott Sheriff] "Thomas Frank] "Come on a professional means someone makes money is there a different levels of money?"

Sure there is. Shane pretty much nailed it. Just like there are different levels in quality of professional tools.
I see a huge difference between someone using X on a 15" laptop that is pretty much dedicated to supporting something consumer oriented like a 5D, and someone with a dedicated facility with multiple NLE's, and the I/O options to support whatever walks in the door from VHS to 4K."


No Scott, he did not. (Nail it.)

The last "wedding video" that I watched was produced by NBC and the BBC - and was likely the single most costly live video production of the past 100 years. The Royal Wedding from England.

I've read stories of guys working in the middle east, who regularly have six figure "wedding video" budgets.

This view that editor 'A" is at the top level, and editor "B" is at a significantly lower level is one largely propagated by those who have comfy seats at the top and feel that they therefore possess some specialized knowledge that makes them "superior" to others.

What they have is demonstrated interest in improving their skills over time - combined with the luck and career navigation chops to have found and stayed in their seat - again, over time.

I'm not dismissing this. It's very hard to become good at something as complex as video production. But there are literally thousands, if not tens (or perhaps hundred!s) of thousands of people doing similar work, world wide. The guys in the seats at the BBC, or the seats in Norwegian TV aren't any more or less "special" than you or me. And I'm sorry, but there are a lot of folks in seats in small production companies who, given the chance could grow into editors every bit as accomplished as anyone of us chatting here.

There is no "magic" that makes one person a "pro" and another an "amateur."

Consider that on the set of Memento, young Chris Nolan didn't have much more than passion and drive and some good ideas - certainly no where near the "professional experience" that you or I have been privileged to have earned - but he managed to slingshot himself beyond all of us. Why? Because "professionalism" isn't just ONE thing. It's a range of things, and his combination of skills were singularly effective for his time and place.

And trust me, there's an "event video" guy out there who's probably a better overall video professional than you or me. Also, likely, some nice lady cutting in the back room of a shabby documentary production group in Bankok.

To think otherwise is hubris, plain and simple.

The explosion of low cost high capability video production tools is going to change the game. Not fast, but over time. And sorry, but having nothing more than "editing skills" is going to be a smaller and smaller "differentiator" in the years to come.

Time to add new skills. Perhaps better people management, data wrangling, or art skills - because no matter how complex visual editing is at it's core (and it IS complex) it's inevitable that more people today know how it works than ever before. And in a generation, it's going to be like the number of people who know how to type.

Yes, there will still be "great novelists" - but also great newspaper writers, great greeting card writers, great ad writers, and great poets - and all of them are worthy of respect.

FWIW.

FWIW.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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Oliver Peters
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 7, 2012 at 6:04:47 pm

[Bill Davis] "Consider that on the set of Memento, young Chris Nolan didn't have much more than passion and drive and some good ideas - certainly no where near the "professional experience" that you or I have been privileged to have earned - but he managed to slingshot himself beyond all of us. Why? Because "professionalism" isn't just ONE thing. It's a range of things, and his combination of skills were singularly effective for his time and place."

I see the point you are trying to make, but I'm not so sure that's a really good example. Filmmaking is a highly collaborative process. On Memento, Nolan also had the help of more experienced pros, like DP Wally Pfister and editor Dody Dorn.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
Orlando, FL
http://www.oliverpeters.com


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James Mortner
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 7, 2012 at 6:20:54 pm

[Bill Davis] "The last "wedding video" that I watched was produced by NBC and the BBC - and was likely the single most costly live video production of the past 100 years. The Royal Wedding from England."

That's really stretching the idea of a "wedding video", Bill. No slurring speeches, no awkward dance, no drunken disco.


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Steve Connor
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 7, 2012 at 6:24:04 pm

[James Mortner] "No slurring speeches, no awkward dance, no drunken disco.
"


Not on the TV coverage at least

Steve Connor
"FCPX Agitator"
Adrenalin Television


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Bill Davis
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 7, 2012 at 7:57:05 pm

[James Mortner] "That's really stretching the idea of a "wedding video", Bill. No slurring speeches, no awkward dance, no drunken disco."

That they let us see...

; )

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor


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James Mortner
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 7, 2012 at 8:06:02 pm

Here's the UK viewers' version :







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Chris Harlan
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 10:02:39 pm

[Thomas Frank] "Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist"

Fanboi idiot blather. That is perhaps the stupidest statement I have read all month.


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TImothy Auld
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 6, 2012 at 10:16:00 pm

Indeed. Just because their are more industry standards than there have every been does not mean that they no longer exist.

Tim


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Rafael Amador
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 7, 2012 at 2:57:45 am

[Herb Sevush] "The reason being that they come from the feature film world, where you are directly replacing a film process with a digital equivalent. To be picky, those are digital workflow expressions, not NLE specific. They make sense when dealing with clients who knew the film equivalents in the first place - there are plenty of corporate clients who wouldn't know what you were talking about."
Everything started there and we keep doing the same. The only thing have changed are the technical means.

This guy of the FC UNIVERSITY said very stupid things:
[Thomas Frank] "Seriously, any season pro is smart enough to learn FCP X easily with proper training (just like they did way back when for whatever they’ve been using for the past decade), and anyone who says otherwise is either a liar, or really stupid."
I didn't need to learn new language or new concepts to work with FC.
Most of all, I didn't need to try to forget nothing I was used to, to start editing in FC since the first day.
rafael

http://www.nagavideo.com


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Thomas Frank
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Feb 7, 2012 at 7:52:02 am

I wonder if the blog arthur is following this?
Would be interesting hear what he has to say, or will take it down...


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Thomas Frank
Re: Nothing Is Professional & Industry Standards No Longer Exist
on Dec 21, 2012 at 10:14:09 pm

Well here is a Update from the same guy...

http://www.fcproxuniversity.com/FCPro_X_University/Extra_Credit/Entries/201...

What you guys think?



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