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Codex - more color tools

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Oliver Peters
Codex - more color tools
on Feb 27, 2018 at 1:40:19 pm

Looks interesting.

http://www.fcp.co/final-cut-pro/articles/2045-codex-annouce-colorsynth-plug...

- Oliver

Oliver Peters - oliverpeters.com


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Scott Witthaus
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Feb 27, 2018 at 1:49:45 pm

Very interesting and a control surface to boot! Thanks for sharing.

Scott Witthaus
Senior Editor/Visual Storyteller
https://vimeo.com/channels/1322525
Managing Partner, Low Country Creative LLC
Professor, VCU Brandcenter


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Oliver Peters
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Feb 27, 2018 at 2:06:52 pm

[Scott Witthaus] "and a control surface to boot!"

It's interesting that this panel deviates from the norm - no track balls. However, that's similar to the Koji (Dale Grahn) plug-in controls, which are based on film timing methods and terminology.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters - oliverpeters.com


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Feb 27, 2018 at 9:27:44 pm

Looks interesting, but I wonder how big the market is for a $299 grading plugin when Color Finale ($149) seems to be the go-to grading plugin for X, and Apple just re-vamped the built-in tools. Also, $1500 seems pretty pricey for only working with the that one plugin.


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Michael Gissing
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Feb 28, 2018 at 12:26:19 am

Resolve Studio and it's smaller proprietary panel are the same price. Even cheaper if you are happy with Resolve Free. It sounds a lot like the layer based hierarchy that Color with FCP Studio offered.

I'm not sure that a control panel sans trackballs is going to impress for that price. I would have thought that the controller would have been cheaper without trackballs.


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Feb 28, 2018 at 2:44:21 am

[Michael Gissing] "Resolve Studio and it's smaller proprietary panel are the same price. "

The Micro Panel ($999) and Resolve Studio ($299) is much cheaper than FCP X ($299), the Codex plugin ($299) and Codex panel ($1500).

Resolve is also a well established and widely used which I think makes buying proprietary hardware for it an easier pill to swallow. I don't imagine many colorists are going to take projects edited in PPro or Avid and bring them into FCP X so they can grade using the Codex plugin and panel. For projects that originate in X you can already use panels with Color Finale and X's revamp first-party tools.

I think Codex really needs to blow the doors off what's currently available, and hope there is a lot of untapped demand for mind blowing, high end color tools in X, if they want people to fork over $1800.


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Michael Gissing
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Feb 28, 2018 at 3:39:25 am

I wasn't including the price of X on the assumption that it was comparing using this for current X users to buying Resolve's offerings. Even though Resolve is cheaper and more capable, I'm sure there are those that want to stay within their NLE of choice as I want to do within Resolve.

I'd want to know a lot more about masks, tracking those masks and how the layers interact before passing any further judgment on the grade tools.


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Bill Davis
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Feb 28, 2018 at 4:28:13 pm

Considering the names involved behind this - it looks like some major players are betting that the penetration of FCP X into ever larger facility workflows will continue.

Plus, the thing itself looks like it's something a highly skilled colorist could easily toss (with a dependable OLED or FSI flat panel monitor) into a carryon bag and go knock out high end grades as, when, and where needed.

It's a crazy new world out there.

Creator of XinTwo - http://www.xintwo.com
The shortest path to FCP X mastery.


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Oliver Peters
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Feb 28, 2018 at 5:13:32 pm

[Bill Davis] "Considering the names involved behind this - it looks like some major players are betting that the penetration of FCP X into ever larger facility workflows will continue. "

Actually, I'm not sure that's the intent. Codex offers location tools and this fits into the wheelhouse of DITs and on-set editor-colorists. FCPX is ideal in that world and so that might be Codex's target user. Not to mention, the price tag is fine for a DIT, where there's less price sensitivity than in the greater FCPX world. After all, a DIT cart alone is a lot more money than this software.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters - oliverpeters.com


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Bill Davis
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Feb 28, 2018 at 6:08:11 pm

[Oliver Peters] "Not to mention, the price tag is fine for a DIT, where there's less price sensitivity than in the greater FCPX world. After all, a DIT cart alone is a lot more money than this software.
"


That makes sense, Oliver.

Thanks for the clarification.

Creator of XinTwo - http://www.xintwo.com
The shortest path to FCP X mastery.


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Feb 28, 2018 at 7:29:18 pm

[Oliver Peters] "FCPX is ideal in that world and so that might be Codex's target user."

Resolve is pretty established in this on-set/DIT role is it not? What advantages do you see w/using X instead?


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Oliver Peters
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Feb 28, 2018 at 8:35:28 pm

[Andrew Kimery] "What advantages do you see w/using X instead?"

A lot of tasks fall under the broad umbrella of DIT or someone assigned to a similar role within the crew. So it's hard to apply a one-size-fits-all answer. If the needs are purely prepping clips for post, then Resolve is likely still the best choice. However, if a quick turnaround trial edit is needed, then X would be the better choice, because of editing speed.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters - oliverpeters.com


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Bill Davis
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 1, 2018 at 5:08:22 am

[Oliver Peters] "However, if a quick turnaround trial edit is needed, then X would be the better choice, because of editing speed."

Also, possibly, as more and more crews improve metadata collection during the shooting phase, it makes sense to look at whats happening with tools like Lumberjack et al, to capture scene, take, and keyword metadata at the same time the cameras are rolling.

Having an active NLE system running on set should allow better field metadata collection and proofing - and used smartly, assistants for the director, DP and LD, scripty, sound and other departments could conceivably be logging notes on tablets and or smart phones during a shoot - and feeding all that metadata into a cohesive central collection system.

Maybe that's just the data wrangler on a small shoot just doing overall notes for the gig - but on a big shoot, the departments could be generating their own data and feeding it all into an on-set portable server in real time.

Time is still money and the idea that at the end of a shooting day - all of everyone's notes could be centralized and coordinated could conceivably not only save a TON of time - but increase data integrity and security for the whole production.

I suspect on-set data wrangling will change a ton over the coming few years.

Just dreaming out loud.

Creator of XinTwo - http://www.xintwo.com
The shortest path to FCP X mastery.


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Oliver Peters
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 1, 2018 at 1:35:50 pm
Last Edited By Oliver Peters on Mar 1, 2018 at 3:48:23 pm

[Bill Davis] "Having an active NLE system running on set should allow better field metadata collection and proofing - and used smartly, assistants for the director, DP and LD, scripty, sound and other departments could conceivably be logging notes on tablets and or smart phones during a shoot - and feeding all that metadata into a cohesive central collection system."

Well... Speaking as the editor, I typically ignore all of that. I prefer my own organizational methods. When I work on scripted shows (like a feature film, where script notes are common), I'm often way ahead of that stuff by the time I actually receive it from set. So yes, time is money, but sometimes it's better to spend that money in post and give the editors adequate time, rather than have a bloated crew that slows down production.

I realize I opined that this might be intended for DIT use. However - and no offense to anyone doing DIT work - I'd rather see as little of that work done on set as possible. Picking color correction and doing edits on set are often "nice to haves" that don't really contribute anything to the final product. (Films like "Baby Driver" are the exception, because on-set editorial was essential to that film.)

When I've worked with experienced directors who know what they want and how to achieve it, they aren't dependent on a video village and all that support mechanism that has grown up around so much production these days. The number one priority of the on-set support crew, whether you call them a DIT, a data wrangler, or whatever, is to properly get the data from the camera cards onto secure and backed up drives to be sent to editorial. That task alone is often hard enough.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters - oliverpeters.com


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greg janza
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 1, 2018 at 4:07:54 pm

[Oliver Peters] "The number one priority of the on-set support crew, whether you call them a DIT, a data wrangler, or whatever, is to properly get the data from the camera cards onto secure and backed up drives to be sent to editorial. That task alone is often hard enough."

I agree completely. As little energy as possible should be spent on set collecting metadata. I too ignore all of that in the edit. As long as I'm receiving all of the media correctly I can then very efficiently bring it in and organize it amazingly fast through string outs and making use of pancake editing.

I Hate Television. I Hate It As Much As Peanuts. But I Can’t Stop Eating Peanuts.
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Andrew Kimery
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 1, 2018 at 4:37:17 pm

I can't find the thread about it, but didn't Light Iron come out with a custom solution a few years ago to help streamline the process of creating and organizing on set metadata and getting it to post? Individual preferences aside, I assume they saw a niche that needed to be filled and created a new product/service accordingly.

I know Bill's example was for the scripted world, but in unscripted quality field notes are worth their weight in gold once post rolls around.


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Bill Davis
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 1, 2018 at 7:50:52 pm

[Oliver Peters] "Well... Speaking as the editor, I typically ignore all of that. I prefer my own organizational methods."

In your and my time, that's how it typically went.

The editor did ALL the organization "by hand."

I just suspect that the kids coming up will be accustomed to utilizing all the generated metadata their files will carry into the edit by default, even if we weren't as much used to that process.

Time will tell.

Creator of XinTwo - http://www.xintwo.com
The shortest path to FCP X mastery.


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Oliver Peters
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 1, 2018 at 8:35:58 pm

[Bill Davis] "I just suspect that the kids coming up will be accustomed to utilizing all the generated metadata their files will carry into the edit by default, even if we weren't as much used to that process."

Not on this planet.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters - oliverpeters.com


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Neil Goodman
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 2, 2018 at 3:16:34 am

I think it also depends largely on the materials your working on.

If your shooting most of your own stuff and tagging the metadata yourself, and have a relaxed turnaround schedule I can see how that would be helpful in the edit.

In my world, you really only have time to start watching footage right away and making selects. Not much organizing other than "DIALOUGUE & VISUALS" and MAYBE i might do separate reels or keywords for the different types of Visuals (scope, action, etc.) Last year I was doing lots of co brand commercials for ESPN and there was no extra metadata attached to the footage other than the normal stuff like codec and resolution. If I was lucky Id have storyboards and usually very poor script notes. These are multi million dollar shoots with lots of eyeballs and sometimes movie tie ins and still no metadata in sight.


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Bill Davis
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 2, 2018 at 6:38:52 pm

[Neil Goodman] "These are multi million dollar shoots with lots of eyeballs and sometimes movie tie ins and still no metadata in sight."

Which is a really sad.

I know on the shoots where I've had the luxury of Lumberjack and especially if I've been able to make my own notes during a shoot on my iPhone - the time I can spend in creative decision making - verses pure organization - really shifts.

In a string of 10 takes - my on-set decision that "Take 8 was DEFINITELY the circle take" means I can vastly reduce all the time sink of messing around looking at and judging the other 9. Only if 8 somehow fails late in the game - do I have to do ANY assessment of the other 9.

Huge time win.

And ALL you have to do is hold your phone in your hand during the shoot. Have three lumberjack "ratings" tags preset as Bad/OK/HERO
Use OK for the start and stop of EVERY take. (which in X lets you REJECTS everything else but usable takes. Pop in a short Bad tag after stinkers - And pop in a short tag at "HERO" directly after the Winner.

In post, the take before the HERO tag is ALL you have to initially look at. Everything else gets added to the reject bucket.

That alone can save you beaucoup time in post.

Metadata field tagging doesn't have to be either comprehensive or perfect to be HUGELY useful. It just has to be used with understanding.

My 2 cents.

Creator of XinTwo - http://www.xintwo.com
The shortest path to FCP X mastery.


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Oliver Peters
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 2, 2018 at 6:42:33 pm

[Bill Davis] "In a string of 10 takes - my on-set decision that "Take 8 was DEFINITELY the circle take" means I can vastly reduce all the time sink of messing around looking at and judging the other 9. Only if 8 somehow fails late in the game - do I have to do ANY assessment of the other 9."

In most projects, that's a method that almost never really pans out when you get into edit. There are very few projects that I've ever edited that only used the hero take.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters - oliverpeters.com


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Bill Davis
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 2, 2018 at 6:59:49 pm

[Oliver Peters] "In most projects, that's a method that almost never really pans out when you get into edit. There are very few projects that I've ever edited that only used the hero take."

If thats how you think about it - it won't.

It's not "only using the hero take." at all. It's FOCUSING your initial attention on what you saw ONCE, in the field - and preserving that instinct into the suite.

Int he X keyword system, you ALWAYS have the option to step back and re-mine everything. Extend, revert, re think. For me the keyboarding in X isn't EVER about permanence - it's about fluidity. It's focus here NOW - but if that doesn't work - to re-focus takes only seconds.

That's nowhere near "only using" anything.

It's certainly IS a different mindset than the way I used to work when whether I put a subclip into a particular folder or not - was the primary thinking I was conditioned to employ.

Just differing styles - related to conditioned use of different tools, I suppose.

Creator of XinTwo - http://www.xintwo.com
The shortest path to FCP X mastery.


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greg janza
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 2, 2018 at 7:33:12 pm

[Bill Davis] "If thats how you think about it - it won't.
"


It really has nothing to do with a mindset.

For example, an in-house agency spot that i'm working on currently. The final vo was recorded. Notes of good takes were taken in the field during the vo recording session. Those notes were passed onto me to make the edit "easier." I then placed the hero vo takes into the spot and the result was:

Creative Director: "I don't like that read at all."
Client: " What about mixing in other reads for some of the lines?"

So basically all on-set notes were thrown out the window once the vo was brought into edit.

An Alternate approach then:

Bring in the vo, lay it out in a sequence with waveforms showing. From the waveforms, quickly mark the in-points of all takes. this takes about two minutes.

Then bring in Creative director and client and listen to all takes and drop in on the fly to the spot.

To me this is much more realistic to how an average agency edit goes down. If I'm working solo then the on-set takes might be a good starting point but by no means would those notes get me to the finish line.

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Bill Davis
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 3, 2018 at 5:39:24 am

[greg janza] "Then bring in Creative director and client and listen to all takes and drop in on the fly to the spot."

Why, that sounds exactly like... auditions.

Creator of XinTwo - http://www.xintwo.com
The shortest path to FCP X mastery.


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Oliver Peters
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 2, 2018 at 8:38:29 pm

[Bill Davis] "If thats how you think about it - it won't."

It's not that. It's that I work with clients who always want to see something other than what was selected on site. Selecting on site is often inadequate, because focus is distracted. When people can finally concentrate on post, their ideas evolve and change.

I do a lot of narrative and in docu-style edits, I am always "frankenbiting". When I edit dramatic scenes, I will often take pieces of 75% or more of the takes that were shot in order to mold the best overall performances.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters - oliverpeters.com


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 2, 2018 at 9:49:01 pm

I like getting field notes because it gives me a place to start. Sure, it might change once the producer/director/client steps into the room, but I've gotten my first cut done faster because I built everything off the circle takes instead of having to watch each take and decided for myself. Eve if I watch each take and choose which one I think is best that doesn't meant that the producer/director/client won't want a different one.

I'm all about getting that rough cut done as soon as possible because you never really know what's working and what's not until you see it all in context and, at least for me, having good field notes helps get me there faster. I'd rather have information and not need it than need information and not have it.

I worked on a docu-series a while back that had horrible communication from the field and it slowed down post by weeks. We almost never got field notes which meant that the story producers had to watch all the footage before being able to decide on story beats, pull selects, and pass it off to the editors. Good field notes wouldn't spend up the process immensely. Sure, if they felt something was missing they would need to go back into the raw and hunt for it, but their initial pass would happen much quicker.


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Oliver Peters
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 2, 2018 at 9:50:09 pm

I should add that I think where the difference in opinion lies is this: you (Bill) as a producer/director/editor, versus myself and other, who only edit. You have the luxury of making an editorial decision on site that you will then carry through in post. Because you have made that decision, you have the conviction that it is the right one. You have a vested interest emotionally. OTOH, the editor who wasn't on location, can and should be more impartial. Hence a difference in styles and philosophies.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters - oliverpeters.com


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Bill Davis
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 3, 2018 at 5:50:49 am

[Oliver Peters] "Hence a difference in styles and philosophies.
"


Okay, there might be a good measure of truth in this.
We oftennthink what we expect to think - at least to a certain degree.

But I’d still prefer to give everyone (client, director, and yes, me if I’m going to cut it) an iPad or iPhone on set and have everyone codify their opinions of what they saw in the on-set monitors.

I just don’t want to waste my most valuable prep time skimmering more Crap than I actually need to - not if I know everythings still at hand if I need EVERY instance of Line 15 for said potential frankenbitng.

But I agree it depends on expectations, and those are a function of both working habits AND the nature of the tech you’ve become accustomed to.

And so it goes.

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The shortest path to FCP X mastery.


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Brett Sherman
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 8, 2018 at 1:54:38 pm
Last Edited By Brett Sherman on Mar 8, 2018 at 1:55:34 pm

[Oliver Peters] "Because you have made that decision, you have the conviction that it is the right one. You have a vested interest emotionally. OTOH, the editor who wasn't on location, can and should be more impartial. "

It sounds a bit like you're saying the disconnected editor workflow is superior. Let me push back on that a bit. Especially with documentary-style work where accuracy and mood is important. And you might only be talking about scripted work.

I'm not sure how much "vested interest" there is, seems to me to be a bit of a canard. I do think when you experience something in real-life you are gleaning a lot more information that the editor doesn't have access to. You seem to be suggesting this is freeing. Maybe in some cases it is, but I would say it may be more limiting.

By experiencing it in person, you have better memory for the footage/events. There is a reason why all competitors in memory competitions use a "Memory Palace". Because our brains are designed to attach spatial cues to our memories. Editors never have any spatial information as to where this happened in relationship to where that happened.

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Oliver Peters
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 8, 2018 at 5:07:02 pm
Last Edited By Oliver Peters on Mar 8, 2018 at 5:07:18 pm

[Brett Sherman] "And you might only be talking about scripted work."

Yes, I was. That seemed to be the context of the discussion.

- Oliver

Oliver Peters - oliverpeters.com


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 8, 2018 at 5:27:04 pm

[Brett Sherman] "Editors never have any spatial information as to where this happened in relationship to where that happened."

Neither does the audience, and I think that goes to the point of a 'disconnected' editor being advantageous. If the director looks at the footage and mentally fills in gaps with his/her prior knowledge from being on set/location then that can be problematic because the audience won't be privy to that same information. I think a primary role of the editor is to be a surrogate for the audience and being disconnected from production makes that task easier because all you know is what the footage tells you.

I've actually gotten a fair amount of doc work, in part, by playing up the advantages of being 'ignorant' coming into a project because our audience will also be 'ignorant' when sitting down to watch it. Many times there is an energy/magic/excitement that can happen in production that colors people's memories, but that same energy/magic/excitement doesn't necessarily translate into the recorded footage. And ultimately what's recorded in the footage is the only thing that matters.

There is certainly a collaboration that needs to happen between the director and the editor to rectify the differences between "this is what I wanted to capture" vs "this is what you actually captured" and I think that process generally makes for a better end product.


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Brett Sherman
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 8, 2018 at 10:21:23 pm
Last Edited By Brett Sherman on Mar 8, 2018 at 10:32:06 pm

[Andrew Kimery] "I think that goes to the point of a 'disconnected' editor being advantageous. If the director looks at the footage and mentally fills in gaps with his/her prior knowledge from being on set/location then that can be problematic because the audience won't be privy to that same information. I think a primary role of the editor is to be a surrogate for the audience and being disconnected from production makes that task easier because all you know is what the footage tells you."

I think you misinterpreted my point. The audience also doesn't have to dig through hours and hours of footage, the editor does. And that's where memory comes in. Memory for an editor is just about as important as any skill. If you shot it, you know it better than a "disconnected editor" likely ever will. And there is also a significant time savings because no one needs to "learn" the footage.

I don't disagree with your point. I'm also not saying one model is superior to the other. They both have their pros and cons. I think in a cameraman/editor single person arrangement, skills have to be developed which allow you to view something you know a lot about, but with the eyes of someone who doesn't.


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Brett Sherman
One Man Band (If it's video related I'll do it!)
I work for an institution that probably does not want to be associated with my babblings here.


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 9, 2018 at 5:02:25 pm

[Brett Sherman] "And there is also a significant time savings because no one needs to "learn" the footage. "

I'm with you now. Yes, especially in situations where it's not practical for the editor to watch down all the footage, it's very helpful to have someone from production (the director, producer, etc.,) be in post to help answer questions about the footage.


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greg janza
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 9, 2018 at 6:01:51 pm

[Andrew Kimery] "Many times there is an energy/magic/excitement that can happen in production that colors people's memories, but that same energy/magic/excitement doesn't necessarily translate into the recorded footage. And ultimately what's recorded in the footage is the only thing that matters."

I've worked on many doc style pieces and that statement is quite accurate. The excitement that might happen in the field when it's happening live can be very different when seen after the fact through the camera lens. And yes, it's helpful to know from the director what he or she thought was the essence of what was captured but in the end the only thing that really matters is what comes through in the footage.

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Andrew Kimery
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 9, 2018 at 6:32:17 pm

[greg janza] "And yes, it's helpful to know from the director what he or she thought was the essence of what was captured but in the end the only thing that really matters is what comes through in the footage."

And if the essence didn't come through in the footage then the director, since he/she was there, can (hopefully) help the editor recreate it in post.


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greg janza
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 9, 2018 at 6:56:36 pm

agreed.

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Bill Davis
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 11, 2018 at 6:01:37 pm

[Andrew Kimery] "And if the essence didn't come through in the footage then the director, since he/she was there, can (hopefully) help the editor recreate it in post."

I've been on countless field shoots where something a client or an agency rep has said has helped me interpret what will make THIS video more successful - and therefore becomes critical to my editorial understanding.

But I also understand that unless you have the budget for unlimited re-shoots - in many, many situations, the editors job is to find best story that their instincts can locate - in what they actually have - regardless of any "plans" anyone might have had in prep.

Maybe it's a matter of the type of work you do?

Some types of complex narrative arcs probably emerge best when the editor is allowed to becomes "storyteller in chief" - IF the ultimately responsible parties like the director and producers are okay with that.

But in other video types (certainly in corporate work where I have spent most of my career) information from the executive suite "as discussed on set" - has been not just useful, but often CRITICAL to the successful completion of a project.

Yes, an editor often has totally valid reasons to act as a surrogate for the audience's untainted perspective.

But in lots of other situations, the editor who was on-set to soak in more of the INTENT of the field discussions - ALSO can bring a boatload of useful knowledge into the edit suite.

The devil will always be in the details, I suppose.

One factor, is certainly that not that long ago, it was logistically impossible to bring all the tools of the edit suite OUT of the suite and onto location. Today it's pretty trivial.

We'll see if this continues to change at what stage - and where during the post process - editorial work migrates over time.

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The shortest path to FCP X mastery.


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 15, 2018 at 3:34:41 pm

[Bill Davis] "But in other video types (certainly in corporate work where I have spent most of my career) information from the executive suite "as discussed on set" - has been not just useful, but often CRITICAL to the successful completion of a project."

Agreed. I don't work on many corporate projects, but on the ones I have worked on all the language and imagery, has been vetted by marketing, legal, management, etc., so there is no room to 'rediscover' the piece in post. It was all hammered out before hand and the challenge for the editor can be sticking to those guidelines while still trying to make something entertaining and informative.


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greg janza
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 15, 2018 at 4:11:49 pm

[Andrew Kimery] " I don't work on many corporate projects, but on the ones I have worked on all the language and imagery, has been vetted by marketing, legal, management, etc., so there is no room to 'rediscover' the piece in post."

I wish that was the norm but corporate projects in which there's a full vetting by marketing, legal and management prior to shooting or during shooting are rare indeed.

As with so much of video production now, the focus, scope, story, messaging and overall thematic structure of a piece can change many times over throughout the post process.

I'm currently working on a 1min in-house promo spot utilizing a dozen employee interviews that has gone through three rounds of changing the overall message focus. And all of these changes have occurred after all shooting was completed.

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Andrew Kimery
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 15, 2018 at 5:31:51 pm

[greg janza] "I'm currently working on a 1min in-house promo spot utilizing a dozen employee interviews that has gone through three rounds of changing the overall message focus. And all of these changes have occurred after all shooting was completed."

Well that sounds annoying.


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Shawn Miller
Re: Codex - more color tools
on Mar 15, 2018 at 6:41:09 pm

[Andrew Kimery] "[greg janza] "I'm currently working on a 1min in-house promo spot utilizing a dozen employee interviews that has gone through three rounds of changing the overall message focus. And all of these changes have occurred after all shooting was completed."

Well that sounds annoying."


... not so unusual in the corporate video world! ... I could tell you stories... ☺

Shawn



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