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70D overheating

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Mark Anderson
70D overheating
on Aug 1, 2014 at 5:46:26 am

I have been shooting video with the Canon 70D for about 10 months and have been largely impressed with the camera. However, after shooting 100 gigs of video today (mostly outside, 80 degrees) I noticed the overheating icon appear on the top of the LCD screen. This was the first time I have seen it. It never stopped recording, however I lost controls from the shutter and ISO dials. Thankfully, I was able to adjust shutter and ISO with the touch screen, not the dials. It was very strange. I was shooting in the manual mode, 1080, 30FPS. I mostly used the 18-135 STM lens.

I also noticed my auto focus was not working as well either. When shooting in auto focus the focus boxes are white and when the overheating icon appeared the boxes went grey and the auto focus was slow to perform. I typically like to use manual focus but it's a convenient feature to use the 70D's great auto focus system when shooting run-and-gun type of stuff, trucking with your feet, etc. To get the grey boxes back to white, I had to go to the focus button, click on another setting (either tracking, multiple or single) and the white box would appear again, but only for a short time.

The smooth camcorder-like auto focus system in the 70D was a big selling point to me. It has been spot on since I purchased the camera, but it failed today.

When we had a good half-hour break, it was all working again. After we starting to shoot more sequences, the same thing happened as mentioned above.

Lastly, I burned through 5 charged batteries today, which was really odd. I can't help but wonder if today's shooting issues were with the overheating issues.

Any thoughts?


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Ryan Holmes
Re: 70D overheating
on Aug 2, 2014 at 1:52:03 pm

This was a really common problem back in 2008/2009 when the DSLR revolution started. My 7D would do it if we were in hot environments. I remember people actually carrying ice packs or bags of ice and then laying them on top of the camera in-between takes! :-)

For the most those problems are gone, but as you experienced they still crop up. One thing I noticed was related to the type of memory cards I used. The cheaper the memory card (KomputerBay, Kingston), the less consistent the write speed and therefore the buffer in the camera would have to work harder to manage the data being written to the card. If the environment was already warm (especially shooting outside in direct sunlight) then that would trigger it. When I moved up to Sandisk Extreme and Extreme Pro cards I never saw the overheating symbol again. Not sure what cards you're shooting, but I'd look into that. Also if you have a reputable card, but it's not capable of write speeds of at least 50mbps then you should upgrade your cards.

If you're shooting outside in direct sunlight you may think about shading the camera to block it from direct sunlight. While it may be 80 outside air temp, the camera is much warmer being in direct sunlight and in use.

If you're camera is running hot, expect to go through batteries much, much faster. And if the camera buffer was working harder (as mentioned above) it'll chew threw batteries much faster. Ultimately, you should be alright overall. If it happens again it's a good idea to let the camera cool down if possible. Under severe circumstances there can be camera damage from running an overheated camera for a sustained period of time. Or pack some ice on your next outdoor shoot! :-)

Ryan Holmes
http://www.ryanholmes.me
@CutColorPost


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Mark Anderson
Re: 70D overheating
on Aug 2, 2014 at 2:29:51 pm

Great insight, Ryan, thanks! Nice visual thinking of those shooters putting their cams on ice like an athlete after the big game. I used a Sandisk Extreme, 128 gig, 80MB card. It seems anything under 40MB the camera stops recording after 10 seconds. I'll keep an eye on it and pack the ice. :) Thanks again!


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Ryan Holmes
Re: 70D overheating
on Aug 2, 2014 at 3:05:49 pm

[Mark Anderson] " I used a Sandisk Extreme, 128 gig, 80MB card. "

Mark - you're card does have a "10" with a circle around it, right? That would be a Class 10 card which you should have for shooting video. I think the 128GB card only comes in Class 10, but I thought I would bring it up so you double check.

It may just have been an isolated incident. If you have access to other cards, you may try running some tests to see how it goes. But shooting outside can be tough on DSLR's since they aren't good at dissipating heat (no fans). So while you're air temp may be warm, it's even hotter inside the camera and the outside air that should be cooling it off is hot as well so the components never really cool. Add in the sun on top of that and you have a good recipe for a hot camera.

Ryan Holmes
http://www.ryanholmes.me
@CutColorPost


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Mark Anderson
Re: 70D overheating
on Aug 2, 2014 at 3:53:23 pm

Good stuff, Ryan. I checked and my card is class 10. I appreciate your counsel.


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Dr. Patricia Farrell
Re: 70D overheating
on Aug 27, 2014 at 10:46:04 pm

I have a Canon 70D and I'm using a 95MB/sec, class 10 Extreme card, but when trying to shoot video, it just stops after a few seconds. No message, nothing, just stops and offers the video for review.

What am I doing wrong here?


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Mark Anderson
Re: 70D overheating
on Aug 27, 2014 at 11:05:17 pm

That is really odd. Sorry to hear of this. I use Class 10 Extreme cards at 80 mbps and it works fine. One would think 95 is better. By chance did you forget to format the card?


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Dr. Patricia Farrell
Re: 70D overheating
on Aug 27, 2014 at 11:10:06 pm

No, I formatted the card and it still isn't shooting video more than a few seconds. I even tried shooting and after it stopped tried shooting again (someone suggested this). If I can't figure this out, I may call B&H Video in NYC and see if I can come in for some help. I bought the camera from them.


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Mark Anderson
Re: 70D overheating
on Aug 27, 2014 at 11:42:03 pm

Good plan to call B&H. Good luck.


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Dr. Patricia Farrell
Re: 70D overheating
on Aug 28, 2014 at 12:20:13 am

Guess what? I had bought a Canon 70D tutorial DVD and I set up the video shooting as the guy suggested. After I sat here wondering what to do and getting nowhere, it hit me--do the simplest thing. I re-set the camera to all default settings and voila, it shoots video like it's supposed to. I can now use this camera's great features and shoot video, what I really wanted to do with it.

Thanks for your help. So, default settings did it.


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Mark Anderson
Re: 70D overheating
on Aug 28, 2014 at 12:57:44 am

That is awesome news!


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Dr. Patricia Farrell
Re: 70D overheating
on Aug 28, 2014 at 1:01:54 am

Yes, it is. I am so relieved and I really want to take video with this camera. Now it's going to get mounted on a tripod with a fluid, video head and we're off.


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Marcio Caus
Re: 70D overheating
on Apr 24, 2015 at 5:56:40 pm

Hi guys, recently my Canon 70D has been behaving a a bad way. After 10 minutes filming, when I turn off and turn on the camera, I see purple, greenish colours on the lcd screen. When this happens and if I try to take pics, the photos also appear when I transfer the file to my computer. It's usually a matter of turning it off four a couple of mins and then turn back on to get back to normal. The third time it happens which was yesterday, it took a whole day and only when I turned back on this morning it was normal. Canon tech support mention the fact that I use the camera a lot for filming and I'm in a very hot environment here in Brazil. And that's problem while it's experiencing some glitches.

I shot a 10 mins video inside my room with the air conditioning on and it was fine. I'm now afraid to even start filming with it again outside.

Have you guys experienced anything similar?

Thanks in advanced
Marcio


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Mark Anderson
Re: 70D overheating
on Apr 24, 2015 at 7:09:23 pm

Hi Marcio,

I have not had the level of issues that you mentioned. My overheating 70D was becoming more and more consistent for me so I do not use it anymore as my primary camera.

My overheating issues may have been from a recording device which I had stacked under my battery pack. My shooting partner still uses his 70D and has great luck, but he does not stack an audio unit under his batt pack, which leads me to believe this may have been my problem.

I recently picked up a new MKII C100 and no longer have any problems. It has a built in fan to keep it cool. I use the 70D as a backup or b-cam. My primary purpose is video. I wish I had some helpful insight to share with you. I, too, would be worried about filming outside.

Best to you,

-Mark


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Marcio Caus
Re: 70D overheating
on Apr 24, 2015 at 8:47:44 pm

Thanks for the reply Mark! Yea, it's weird. I just had another 20 mins filming session with it and it behaved fine. I'm wondering if it's because I was using some generic batteries as opposed to the canon one and it was overheating more than normal. From now on I'll just use the canon battery to see what happens.

The MKII C100 looks hot man, I'd love to get my hands in one of those. I don't use an audio unit so hopefully I'll figure out a way of using the camera without causing this glitch.

I'll experimenting using my iphone 6 whenever I can and keep the canon 70D for more special occasion.

Thanks for the input, I appreciate it.

Marcio


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Ryan Holmes
Re: 70D overheating
on Apr 24, 2015 at 9:28:44 pm

3rd party batteries can cause problems. Additionally, cheap or slow recording media will cause your camera to heat up because the camera will have to fill up the buffer because the card isn't able to write data fast enough. Cheaper cards (Transcend, Komputer Bay, etc) are far less stable than name brands like Sandisk, Lexar.

DSLR's don't have a fan. So if you're shooting outside, in direct sunlight it's going to heat up...potentially overheat too. Add to that the items listed above (3rd party batteries, slow media, etc) and you could be in for a world of hurt. Take a towel with you when you shoot outside to cover over the camera with when not in use. At one point with my 7D, we even used icepacks to help keep it cool. But there's no great solution to dissipate heat with a DSLR. They're just not made for video even though they're capable of video.

Ryan Holmes
http://www.ryanholmes.me
@CutColorPost


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