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lines on 7D footage

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jordi robert
lines on 7D footage
on Feb 26, 2014 at 11:02:21 am

Hi guys
I was shooting on a low light conditions, probably pushing ISO to 1000. It was in a kitchen, it was hot. When it came to editing I noticed (just in a few clips) some horizontal lines. You can see it in the picture, 3 thick lines, one on top of the screen, one on the middle and one on the bottom. See pic attached. Any ideas what that could be?
Thank you



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Ryan Holmes
Re: lines on 7D footage
on Mar 6, 2014 at 3:03:40 am

Did you light the scene with fluorescent lights?

It looks like the type of effect that happens at some frame rates/shutter speeds when shooting with a rolling shutter camera, like a DSLR. Unfortunately, there's no fix in post. Best thing to do or is to reshoot it.

Now that you know what they look like, be on the lookout for them when you're on set. You can see them on a monitor or even the small LCD on the bag of the camera if you look close enough (just not always easy to do when you're in the midst of shooting).

Ryan Holmes
http://www.ryanholmes.me
@CutColorPost


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jordi robert
Re: lines on 7D footage
on Mar 7, 2014 at 11:09:35 am

Thanks Ryan, yes there were fluorescent lights.
So, if it happens again, what would be the best solution during shooting? Keep in mind that this is not a set, its a professional kitchen so I have limited control on lighting.

Thank you.

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Ryan Holmes
Re: lines on 7D footage
on Mar 7, 2014 at 3:21:25 pm

[jordi robert] "So, if it happens again, what would be the best solution during shooting?"

Since this is a set, I'd recommend testing during off times. Since you're not under a run-and-gun scenario spend a day testing out different settings.

Ultimately, the biggest variable is your shutter speed. The shutter speeds used will depend on where you're shooting (America vs. Europe), type of lights, frame rate, etc. You'll need to experiment with different shutter speeds within your space to see which one mitigates the effect the most. Typically staying at a shutter speed that is twice your frame (what's called 180 degrees) is usually the best way to go.

Ryan Holmes
http://www.ryanholmes.me
@CutColorPost


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