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Make-Up for Talent

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Neal Klaeser
Make-Up for Talent
on Mar 8, 2011 at 10:11:31 pm

I am about to do a shoot for a client and he asked if I could bring along some make-up to apply to the presenter so he will not shine on camera. The presenter is the CEO of the hospital so I would assume that he does not have is own make up kit. Is there a "generic" or "common" make up to apply to any skin type such as Caucasian, Latino, African-American, etc.


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Scott Sheriff
Re: Make-Up for Talent
on Mar 9, 2011 at 3:20:44 am

Neal,
"I am about to do a shoot for a client and he asked if I could bring along some make-up to apply to the presenter so he will not shine on camera. The presenter is the CEO of the hospital so I would assume that he does not have is own make up kit. Is there a "generic" or "common" make up to apply to any skin type such as Caucasian, Latino, African-American, etc."

To just bust the shine off of people, there are self contained loose powder with an attached brush units that you can buy at wally world, or Target. The powder is stored in the handle and 'shakes' thru the application brush. Get 3-4 different shades. Be sure to check to make sure the selected shade doesn't contain any glitter (sometimes called shimmer mostly in darker shades), you want straight powder. Be sure to bring a lint roller, as the powder can get on the subjects clothes.
In addition to the powders its not a bad idea to get some heavier pancake foundation in light and medium tone, a separate brush, sponge applicators, stick type concealer, hair spray, comb, brush, scissors, q-tips, vasaline, small mirror, sewing items, safety pins, small cotton pads. For under a hundred bucks you could build a general purpose kit that is about the size of a shoebox.

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com

I have a system, it has stuff in it, and stuff hooked to it. I have a camera, it can record stuff. I read the manuals, and know how to use this stuff and lots of other stuff too.
You should be suitably impressed...


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Angelo Lorenzo
Re: Make-Up for Talent
on Mar 9, 2011 at 6:47:45 am

Kryolan Anti-Shine Powder, its a stage/film product designed for all skin types. Use this before any additional makeup or concealer and don't be afraid to get some blotting paper as well.


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Scott Sheriff
Re: Make-Up for Talent
on Mar 9, 2011 at 4:08:44 pm

Angelo,
"Kryolan Anti-Shine Powder, its a stage/film product designed for all skin types. Use this before any additional makeup or concealer and don't be afraid to get some blotting paper as well."

Great suggestions. I was thinking more in terms of easy to get/OTC, since it isn't always easy to find professional products on short notice.

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com

I have a system, it has stuff in it, and stuff hooked to it. I have a camera, it can record stuff. I read the manuals, and know how to use this stuff and lots of other stuff too.
You should be suitably impressed...


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Bill Davis
Re: Make-Up for Talent
on Mar 10, 2011 at 1:44:15 am

Here we go again.

We keep telling anyone and everyone who owns a spiffy video camera that it's NOT the camera that makes a great video - it's the experience and talent of the person USING the camera.

Make-up is EXACTLY the same thing.

If all you want is inexpertly applied shine busting, feel free to do it yourself. If, on the other hand, you want your MAKEUP to have the same professional results as you expect your clients to pay for their video results - then PAY for an experienced MUA. Period.

You spend money, you can get someone who can clear skin, un-hollow tired eyes, and — in a medium that will expose them to dozens, hundreds, or maybe even THOUSANDS of people over months or even years — elevate their appearance from OK to "WOW, you looked just GREAT in that video"

You don't see the worth in that, fine. Buy yourself some powder and have at it. Just don't complain when the next video client tells you that their brother-in-law with his new handycam can do YOUR job as well as you. The thinking is precisely the same.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Conner


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Scott Sheriff
Re: Make-Up for Talent
on Mar 10, 2011 at 10:08:36 pm

Bill,
"We keep telling anyone and everyone who owns a spiffy video camera that it's NOT the camera that makes a great video - it's the experience and talent of the person USING the camera.

Make-up is EXACTLY the same thing.
"

"You don't see the worth in that, fine. Buy yourself some powder and have at it. Just don't complain when the next video client tells you that their brother-in-law with his new handycam can do YOUR job as well as you. The thinking is precisely the same."

I don't disagree with your basic sentiment, but in the real world it just ain't happenin'. I have been doing this for going on thirty years, and I have seen DIY camera, lighting and editing ruin a shoot. But I have never seen crew, or talent self applied make-up ruin a shoot, or had anyone complain. It's pretty hard to mess up the basics, and certainly better than letting someone go on with a big grease shine, when that can be fixed pretty easy.

Many of us do our own directing, camera operation, lighting, sound, editing, mographs, etc. This does not make us any less than professional. In an ideal situation I would like to have a crew of at least 20 plus all necessary support services on every shoot. But there are a variety of reasons that this isn't in the cards. For many projects this would be out of the budget, or just total overkill.
Having some basic make-up items is no different then having dull spray, or gaff tape. I don't need to employ a gaffer, to use the tape.
Quite often you may be shooting 'average joe's', and they will not consent to a full sit-down make-up session. Your lucky if you can sneak up on them with a quick dusting with some powder to bust the shine. And while a dedicated make-up person would be able to make them look great, often it isn't that important to the subject. At least not so important that I want to risk making them uncomfortable, or feeling intimidated. Just being on camera is often pushing the limit for some of these folks.
Another reason to have some basics is you also find yourself working with folks that are use to doing their own. It is not unusual for them to show up empty handed. Having some basics in case they need to do some touch up is just good sense.
So your point about fixing dark eyes, blotchy skin is well taken, and I wouldn't even attempt that type of thing DIY. And sometimes the talent requests a professional make-up artist. But I'm really talking about some basics that just about anyone should be able to do.
And of course we can always just fix it in post with several different plugins.

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com

I have a system, it has stuff in it, and stuff hooked to it. I have a camera, it can record stuff. I read the manuals, and know how to use this stuff and lots of other stuff too.
You should be suitably impressed...


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Bill Davis
Re: Make-Up for Talent
on Mar 15, 2011 at 9:25:44 am

Scott,

I understand both points of view and I know that makeup has been undervalued and underappreciated for a long time in our industry. (I'm also a 30 year working pro) And I also agree that the quality of modern cameras with elements like skin detail can go a long way to making people with modest issues look good.

However, there are two trends that support my contention that pro shooters might want to consider elevating makeup to a stronger position in current best practices.

The first is the move to High Def. Minor bleminshes that disappeared in lousy rez of the SD days can stand out like (terrible simile, sorry) a sore thumb in these days of HD cameras. This is also true of rashes, freckles, cold sores, and a host of other common natural shocks that flesh is heir to.

The other trend is, in my opinion, even more compelling. That's the continuing inclusion of women into all levels of the workforce. Once upon a time, it was rare for a woman to be in the corporate suite and acting as spokesperson. Today, it's VERY common. And that woman is MUCH more likely to not only appreciate, but EXPECT to have people available to help her look her best on camera. And she's likely VERY conditioned to makeup being a part of that. Having a pro around to apply it rather than leaving it as a "do it yourself" gig adds a layer of perceived service that is often extremely appreciated.

So I'd advise everyone to have a couple of quality make up artists in your business phone list.

The time you decide the budget just won't stretch that far (typically just a couple of hundred bucks for a single session) you might discover that you're being "penny wise and pound foolish."

I know I had makeup brought in for a female executive a few months ago. And her company has since come back for THREE additional projects - and I KNOW that a part of that return work is because all her staff and she herself commented on how good she looked in the original video.

Best $200 bucks I've spent in a LONG time!

YMMV.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Conner


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Scott Sheriff
Re: Make-Up for Talent
on Mar 21, 2011 at 9:56:36 pm

Bill,
I think we are in agreement. I would look at a make-up artist the same as a Pro Tools person. For simple stuff I can certainly do my own mix. But some projects demand a specialist. I would also agree that if you're doing an extensive shoot with an executive, that type of thing, by all means get in a make-up artist.
I was think more of the run 'n guns where you have a bunch of quick bites from blue collar types for training/instructional. Often these go sans make-up, which is where I think having some basics can be a bonus.
And yes, having a working relationship with folks ahead of time is also a good idea.
And you are so right about HD cams. Not only do they show every wrinkle, but sets need to have a much better level of finish.

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com

I have a system, it has stuff in it, and stuff hooked to it. I have a camera, it can record stuff. I read the manuals, and know how to use this stuff and lots of other stuff too.
You should be suitably impressed...


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James Dow
Re: Make-Up for Talent
on Mar 17, 2011 at 2:08:01 pm

Amen, Brother Scott..Amen

JPD


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