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jim stamos
boom mic for dialogue
on May 30, 2012 at 5:02:53 pm

getting ready to shoot a short film and will need a good boom for the dialogue scenes . any suggestions on a good one that wont cost us more than our house?
ive been looking at the rode ntg2 and at897?thoughts??


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Ty Ford
Re: boom mic for dialogue
on May 30, 2012 at 5:06:01 pm

Hello Jim and welcome to the Cow Audio Forum.

Will you be shooting inside or outside?

Regards,

Ty Ford
Cow Audio Forum Leader


Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide
Ty Ford Blog: Ty Ford's Blog


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jim stamos
Re: boom mic for dialogue
on May 30, 2012 at 5:18:09 pm

mainly inside


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Ty Ford
Re: boom mic for dialogue
on May 30, 2012 at 5:27:46 pm

Hey Jim,

Yes, an Audix scx-1hc or Audio Technica AT4053b will do nicely. It's not as good as a film industry standard Schoeps cmc641, but will do.

Regards,

Ty Ford
Cow Audio Forum Leader


Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide
Ty Ford Blog: Ty Ford's Blog


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Craig Alan
Re: boom mic for dialogue
on Jun 5, 2012 at 5:53:06 am

We've used the Audio Technica AT4053b and it sounds really nice. However, it is quite directional and the boom operator must keep it aimed correctly or you will have drop offs to deal with in post. If you can, have the boom operators wearing headphones during the shoot. Even though it is directional you will still pick up any and all unwanted sound from the environment. To boom correctly requires a lot more coordination than wireless lavs. The cam operator, lighting designer, boom operators, audio engineer, talent and director all need to work together to pull it off. Even then you might need to use some ADR so be sure to capture some room tone while you are on location. Even if you do not record dialog ADR the room tone can fill in gaps if say a part needs to be deleted due to an unwanted noise. Make sure as many people as possible are monitoring the sound with headphones. You might also have some means to playback the scenes with a good sound system on location so you can hear any problems. Another thing to consider is that some people sound boomier and/or muddier than others even with the same recorded levels. So the boom operator might practice with the talent before the shoot. Because you are aiming down at the subjects, any prop or set movement that generates sound will be unnaturally amplified. You might consider a Zepplin style windscreen as well. Make sure your talent is expecting multiple takes of each scene. Be sure to have barn doors and some flags to control shadows generated by the boom. Try to use stand-ins to work out the lighting so that the actors don't become exhausted. Even basic sound levels can be pre-set but obviously adjusted for each actor. The audio engineer should know when an actor's voice level will increase dramatically and determine when to lower the levels in anticipation. The mike too can be pulled back for those moments.

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