FORUMS: list search recent posts

What microphone suits me best?

COW Forums : Audio Professionals

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Alex Vallin
What microphone suits me best?
on Mar 21, 2012 at 6:53:40 pm

So im new to audio and ive been considering in investing into a microphone for my DSLR (T3i).I want a decently priced microphone at around 150 such as the Rode Video Mic on Amazon.com
http://www.amazon.com/Rode-VideoMic-Directional-Condenser-Microphone/dp/B00...

how ever im not sure if that microphone would suit me best.What I plan on using it for is for making proffesionalistic short films to capture my audio with.I mainly do films about action,horror ect... So what microphone would work for me to plug into my camera and record my audio with? and maybe there are some mics that are external and dont plug into the camera's microphone jack.AS I said i am really new to audio so any help would be appreciated! im looking to spend anywhere up to 200$.Also Can someone explain to me what a shock mount does and what purpose it serves?Thanks to anyone who helps me out!


Return to posts index

Chris Conlee
Re: What microphone suits me best?
on Mar 21, 2012 at 11:56:46 pm

Generally speaking, what you want to do is get whatever microphone you're using as close as humanly possible to the talent who's speaking. That's why every professional movie and television show has a boom operator and a production mixer. Getting the mic as close to the talent as possible increases the dialog level relative to the surrounding ambience (noise) and creates a better track.

Any mic that you put on your camera is already going to be operating from a position of compromise, because it will be further from your talent than you want.

A shotgun mic will be more directional and can sort of zero in on your talent, but if the talent is not directly in front of the camera's lens, the audio will start to fall off quite aggressively. Conversely, an omni cardiod mic will pick up talent in a broader range, but will also pick up more surrounding noise. It's not a simple answer.

The shock mount, however, is simply a device which seeks to minimize sounds incurred by handling the camera and mic. Since the mic is directly connected to the camera, any handling sounds get transfered directly to the mic and end up in your soundtrack. But with a proper shock mount you can reduce that.

Good luck.

Chris


Return to posts index

Alex Vallin
Re: What microphone suits me best?
on Mar 23, 2012 at 3:10:02 am

yes I understand that a shotgun mic is directional.How Can I possibly get a shotgun mic and have it record to something else(other than the camera) I think the camera does a REALLY bad job at recording audio.I have a t3i.My friend let me borrow an audio technica at875r and its a 170$ mic but it sounds really really noise and does not sound as loud as the built in camera microphone.Please recomend me a shotgun mic and an external recording device I can control/hear/record my audio to! dont want to spend anymore than 300$.
I have seen something about plugging in the Rode into an zoom H1 because the Zoom H1 has an SD card to record into but I am not sure if that will give me good quality? and I am going to build a boom pole & shock myself since I work in the CNC machining field.


Return to posts index


Ty Ford
Re: What microphone suits me best?
on Mar 23, 2012 at 2:33:24 am

Hello Alex and welcome to the Cow Audio Forum.

Maybe this will help explain more about the helpful points Chris is making.

http://tyfordaudiovideo.blogspot.com/2012/03/non-shotgun-boom-mics-for-inte...

Regards,

Ty Ford
Audio Forum Leader


Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide
Ty Ford Blog: Ty Ford's Blog


Return to posts index

Tony Koretz
Re: What microphone suits me best?
on Mar 30, 2012 at 10:03:30 pm

Getting a microphone off the camera is something you really want to do if at all possible. Doing some reading on the subjects of microphones, and also general things like syncing audio with video would probably benefit you. Try to understand some of the principles of these things a bit more before you spend money on buying equipment. It takes practice, experience and a good knowledge of the subject to get proficient at getting good, professional sounding audio. Since a good link has been posted already to a tutorial on microphones, I won't get too specific there, but I have written a tutorial on the importance of getting good audio with video, which you may also find to be helpful, and you can find that tutorial here:

http://rocksuresoundz.com/2011/10/11/the-importance-of-getting-good-audio/

Rocksure Soundz
http://rocksuresoundz.com


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]