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Josh Buchanan
Studio Sound
on Jan 16, 2012 at 5:53:54 pm

Hey guys,
I have a question about a studio sound set up, I've recently been asked to do sound for a cooking type show and it's in a studio. I don't have much experience with studio sound.
The basic idea is two guys with two cooking stations, and an announcer.
So what I was thinking of was putting Lavs on the two chefs, have a handheld mic for the announcer, and two shotguns on booms to record the cooking sounds.
What would the best way to record them? Each recorded to a separate channel? Like to a mixer then out of the mixer into several H4ns or is there a multiple track recorder you guys can suggest?
Also any suggestions on mics also? I was thinking Rode NTG2s for the shotgun, and not sure about the LAVs.
Thanks


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Josh Buchanan
Re: Studio Sound
on Jan 16, 2012 at 6:45:01 pm

I was looking around and found the Sound Devices 788T. And I've heard some good things about it so far. If I went with something like this, would I need a mixer to go into it? And what would be good mixer?


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Richard Crowley
Re: Studio Sound
on Jan 16, 2012 at 7:42:10 pm

I would just go all the way with lav (or headset) mics for all three "speaking parts".

Not clear why you would need booms for the SFX of the cooking? I would think a strategically placed "plant mic" would be sufficient for each station.

If you budget allows an SD 788 then by all means go for it. It has separate inputs, preamps, record level controls and tracks for eight inputs, so a mixer is not required. There is an accessory control panel with slide pots for real-time mixing. But it would seem easier to just "track" each mic to its own channel and then mix the sound in post. Unless you are doing this live? Or "live to tape"?


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Josh Buchanan
Re: Studio Sound
on Jan 16, 2012 at 10:01:17 pm

Ok, cool thanks. It's live to tape. What mic would you recommend? And do you have any other suggestions on recorders? Like brands to look at and brands to stay away from.
Thanks


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Bob Kessler
Re: Studio Sound
on Jan 17, 2012 at 3:21:20 am

Why does everyone insist on buying? Why can't you rent? It will be a lot cheaper.

Peace,

Bob
____________________________________________________________________
Filmmaking is the art of the invisible;
If anyone notices your work you haven't done your job right.


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Richard Crowley
Re: Studio Sound
on Jan 17, 2012 at 6:45:37 am

If it is live to tape that means you have a dedicated (and experienced) crew person to do the sound mixing in real time as you shoot. And that also means that you don't need separate microphone tracking (for doing the mix during post production).

Are you also switching video live to tape? Or are you recording the cameras separately and editing? Without a clearer description of your production flow, it is difficult to answer your questions.

If you can afford $ound Device$, it makes no sense to look at anything else. Virtually everything else is downhill from there. And it is priced accordingly. You didn't mention your budget, either. Or why buying makes more sense than renting or hiring an experienced sound person who brings their own gear and knows how to use it properly.


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Ty Ford
Re: Studio Sound
on Jan 17, 2012 at 4:15:32 am

Hello Josh and welcome to the Cow Audio Forum.

The first question is whether or not you are required to submit. If it's a mixed program master, you're looking at three talent mics. They might pickup cooking sounds or you might need one or two additional mics.

That's 5 mics and a mixer. That's be a Sound Devices 552 direct to one or two camera audio inputs and mixing live. To do that right, you need a place to set up properly and allow the person mixing the sound to pay complete attention to the job.

The other way to do it is record all tracks in post adjusting during recording as needed, and mixing in post. The 788T would be more than enough.

In fact, with a 788T, you have enough tracks to record five isoed tracks and a stereo mixed master. If you get the mixed master right, you don't need the isos. If you blow a mix move, you can drop down to the iso tracks and patch things up.

I'm not sure the 788T and plus faders have that capability, but I think they do. I know they have the automixer. http://sounddevices.com/download/788t-firmware.htm

Call 'em and see what they say. Really, they are that easy.

Regards,

Ty Ford


Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide


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Peter Groom
Re: Studio Sound
on Jan 17, 2012 at 2:15:21 pm

If its for broadcast Id def suggest 3 personal mics on the cookers and pres, AND 2 slung rifles above the cooking area to provide effects and a little air in the mix on the cookers voices.
Unless this is going to be a regular gig for you, id suggest renting high quality gear rather than buying what you can afford.
Obviously a multitrack field recorder like the sound devices is favourite, but Deva make one too, and Ive had good results with a small pro tools rig recording everything separately onto hard disc, and doing a scratch mix at the same time (ie a rough besic mix of the key elements (voices and effects) live onto video tracks so the editor has something to work with.
As long as everything is time code locked (jamsynced) youll be good to go in post.

Id guard against recording things onto sep machines (like multiple zooms, and trying to sync them later. You WILL end up with things being a few samples out of sync which can cause terrible phase problems and a metallicy sound when you try to balance.
Peter

Post Production Dubbing Mixer


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