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Voice Over Tools in a Non-Studio Setting

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Richard Kuenneke
Voice Over Tools in a Non-Studio Setting
on Sep 11, 2011 at 3:43:44 pm

I'm recording fifty (50) short audio messages and have no choice but to use my home office. These messages will air on local radio.

I'm using a Tascam DR100 & Rode NT1-A with a pop filter.

I can adjust the surroundings to improve the acoustics - although it won't be perfect.

I'm aware of the folly of this - and that I should spend hundreds to book a local audio studio - but I cannot.

Given these constraints, what - if anything - can I do to ensure the best outcome?

I am a video editor - primarily. Are there any software solutions that could help? Should I upgrade the microphone - or would that be for nought given the less than ideal studio config?

Rich


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Glenn Axford
Re: Voice Over Tools in a Non-Studio Setting
on Sep 11, 2011 at 6:50:50 pm

Hi,
There is no reason you can't get good quality sound in a non studio setup. As a recording engineer come film maker, I don't alway have access to a real studio. Your equipment is good, just try to acoustically dampen you room as much as possible (sonex, cloth cover fiberglass filled frames etc.). Record close to the mic to reduce room sound. Record at least at 48k, 16 bit, WAV. Use light compression (2:1 ratio, 3 - 5db gain reduction, auto level -3) will tighten the sound nicely. The Soundtrack pro compressor works well.

Glenn Axford


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Richard Kuenneke
Re: Voice Over Tools in a Non-Studio Setting
on Sep 11, 2011 at 10:56:20 pm

Thank you, Glenn. Great advice on the adjustments - I really appreciate the help!

Rich


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Jordan Wolf
Re: Voice Over Tools in a Non-Studio Setting
on Sep 11, 2011 at 9:20:46 pm

Richard,

One of the best things you can do is listen to the room using the microphone you're going to use. I think you may be surprised at how much noise there (usually) is. Air conditioning, fluorescent lights, appliances (computers, too) all generate some form of noise - it could be from an onboard fan or it could be EMI (electro-magnetic interference) from a power supply.

Once you determine how the room sounds "normally", you can adjust certain things to taste. I wouldn't make the room too dead, either. Use the ambience to start with and make little changes from there.

Wolf
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Richard Kuenneke
Re: Voice Over Tools in a Non-Studio Setting
on Sep 11, 2011 at 11:00:15 pm

Thank you Mr. Wolf?

I can make it very quiet - my biggest noise is the air handling - so I shut down the HVAC or record between operation. Those previous audio projects were nothing like this upcoming project. In the past I noticed the sound was muddy - could I adjust the high frequency without affecting the on-air quality and whatever the radio station might "add" to the overall sound?

Rich


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Jordan Wolf
Re: Voice Over Tools in a Non-Studio Setting
on Sep 12, 2011 at 3:25:01 am

"In the past I noticed the sound was muddy - could I adjust the high frequency without affecting the on-air quality and whatever the radio station might 'add' to the overall sound?"

Could you post a clip of this "muddy" audio? A lot of times, muddiness can come from the proximity effect exhibited by cardioid microphones (or any mic with a pattern, for that matter). How far away are you from the microphone when you use it? Have you tried speaking off-axis to see if that changes it in a way you like?

Let us know!

Wolf
<><


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Ty Ford
Re: Voice Over Tools in a Non-Studio Setting
on Sep 12, 2011 at 3:28:06 am

Hello Richard and welcome to the Cow Audio Forum.

Note to Glenn: you damp sound, not dampen it, unless using water.

Richard, the advice you are getting is good, but you make a good point about muddiness. There are many things that can cause this, including a bad mic or working a good mic too closely.

The best way to EQ in a case like this is to reduce the low frequencies rather than boosting the highs.

Regards,

Ty Ford

Cow Audio Forum Leader
Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide


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