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ajay brar
stereo, mono and dual mono
on Jun 4, 2010 at 12:32:08 pm

Hi,

I am new to this so please bear with me,

I recorded some footage. There was a single mic, plugged to a single XLR input but set to record on both channels.
So when I import into final cut, I get the audio as stereo.

1. Now this isn't real stereo right? Its just the single mono recorded on two channels?

2. If I split the stereo pair into 2 mono tracks and set one to left and the other to right, it should be the same?

3. And if i just put a single mono track but set the pan to 0, that is the same effect?

Just wondering about this. I am pretty sure the answer to the above is yes and its mono but recorded on two channels but want to confirm.

thanks in advance
Ajay


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Peter Groom
Re: stereo, mono and dual mono
on Jun 4, 2010 at 3:01:25 pm

I recorded some footage. There was a single mic, plugged to a single XLR input but set to record on both channels.
So when I import into final cut, I get the audio as stereo.

1. Now this isn't real stereo right? Its just the single mono recorded on two channels?

A. Correct.Its Called Dual mono

2. If I split the stereo pair into 2 mono tracks and set one to left and the other to right, it should be the same?
A correct

3. And if i just put a single mono track but set the pan to 0, that is the same effect?
Correct (and more desirable. fewer tracks = less editing, less risk of phase issues creeping in.)
You will find the audio will drop by 3db on a centre pan of this mono signal, so a +3db gain to make it up will be applied.

Peter

Dubbing Mixer

Peter


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Ty Ford
Re: stereo, mono and dual mono
on Jun 5, 2010 at 12:42:09 am

Hello Ajay and welcome to the Cow Audio Forum.

Peter, as usual, is spot on.

This dual mono can be handy if the tracks were recorded at too low a level. While copying and pasting an extra track is also possible, having two already there is just more convenient unless you try to put an effect on one of them, then it's not uncommon for the latency of the plugin to retard that track a bit and make the combination sound smeary.

Regards,

Ty Ford

Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






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ajay brar
Re: stereo, mono and dual mono
on Jun 5, 2010 at 3:59:08 am

Thanks for your replies.

The tracks were at a low level so I have decided to stick with the dual mono.

A couple more questions:
1. I have someone throwing a glass away in the footage. The glass is thrown to the left so I want to have that effect of the sound moving and ending in the left. The way I see it, you can do this in two ways: either set volume of the right track to go down. So you only have the sound coming from the left. Or have the right track also pan to the left. Any advantages of doing one over the other?

2. I don't plan on doing any effects on only one track beyond what I mentioned above so just playing with the volume / pan a little bit. Will that cause any issues?

thanks again


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Ty Ford
Re: stereo, mono and dual mono
on Jun 5, 2010 at 11:24:53 am

Ajay

try it and listen. If the glass effect is in the clear (with no dialog) you can make the move and then return the balance. BUT! There may be other background sound that will shift when you do the move that will sound weird.

Enter the world of Foley, You can begin experimenting with creating your own glass throwing recodings and put them on separate tracks.

Have fun.

Regards,

Ty Ford

Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






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Jordan Wolf
Re: stereo, mono and dual mono
on Jun 5, 2010 at 7:28:45 am

1. Now this isn't real stereo right? Its just the single mono recorded on two channels?

Yes.

2. If I split the stereo pair into 2 mono tracks and set one to left and the other to right, it should be the same?

Yes.

3. And if i just put a single mono track but set the pan to 0, that is the same effect?

Sort of...see the other post above. True stereo sound files will have tracks that both counteract and combine with one another to create the stereo image. Our ears rely not just on amplitude (read: volume) but also on the difference in timing of sound that reach both ears to convey spatiality.

If you crunch the numbers (using the width of your skull as a reference point), and figuring that there is roughly a delay of 1ms. per foot, the delay from one ear to the next is probably around half of one millisecond. This, along with the magic black box that is our brain, allows us to perceive direction and orientation of sound.

You will also probably notice what is called "comb filtering" - this is occurs when the same signal is played from two sources that are in different locations. Basically, certain frequencies combine and cancel to give your ears a thin, nasty-sounding mix that can be detrimental to the final product.

Find the sweet spot of your monitors and also do some experiments to find out more. Pink noise works nicely for finding out what comb filtering sounds like. Run it from both speakers and move your head up/down, left/right, and look from side-to-side. Notice how your ear position affects the quality of what you hear...

Wolf
<><


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Peter Groom
Re: stereo, mono and dual mono
on Jun 7, 2010 at 8:00:45 am

HI.
If the sound is a glass smash, then it doesnt really travel, but is spotted in the stereo field.
id split it off, repair the underlying atmos bed that now has a hole, and re position the smash to suit on a new track. This also gives you a great opportunity to record or use a significantly better effect than the one that will have been recorded live.(I suspect!)

Peter

Peter


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