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Recording in a 10,000 SqFT warehouse

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Galen Gustafan
Recording in a 10,000 SqFT warehouse
on Apr 5, 2010 at 2:57:05 pm

Sorry if this is a newbie question. I sometimes record interviews in a 10,000 square foot warehouse. Of course I get an echo, which i want to minimize as best as possible. I have been using just a lav mic, but if needed I have access to whatever I might need.

What kind of set-up should I do?


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Ty Ford
Re: Recording in a 10,000 SqFT warehouse
on Apr 5, 2010 at 4:10:55 pm

Hello Galen and welcome to the Cow Audio Forum.

That's like asking how not to get wet when you walk in the rain. I would suggest you not record in a warehouse. Problem solved.

Regards,

Ty Ford

Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






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Galen Gustafan
Re: Recording in a 10,000 SqFT warehouse
on Apr 5, 2010 at 4:16:40 pm

Thanks guys! I appreciate all the help. I'm more of the middle man here, and I have recomended we shoot the interviews somewhere, ANYWHERE else. But it's futile. I think my contact has convinced the client that he has a "studio." I dont think the client notices any audio problems at all but of course I can hear the echo whenever I am editing.

I just want to do the best I can. I'm going to get a hold of the Audio Boot camp book posted above.


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Ty Ford
Re: Recording in a 10,000 SqFT warehouse
on Apr 5, 2010 at 4:32:25 pm

If the cuts are underscored with music, you lose a lot of the slap.

And yes, there are all sorts of ways to reduce (to some degree) the echo, but most of the time, after we take our time to explain how to do it and what it takes, the poster says, "Oh, the client will never pay for that." , or, "The shooter says we need all those angles.", or the audio person says, "I can't afford that many sound blankets and C-stands."

Regards,

Ty Ford

Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






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Galen Gustafan
Re: Recording in a 10,000 SqFT warehouse
on Apr 5, 2010 at 4:48:29 pm

I defiantly understand that.

Would you recommend a lav mic over a hyper-cardioid on a boom?
Would putting up a wall of C-stands and sound blankets help?



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Ty Ford
Re: Recording in a 10,000 SqFT warehouse
on Apr 5, 2010 at 5:27:52 pm

create a cocoon

as close to the actor a possible.

floor, side walls, overhead

Regards,

Ty

Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






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Ty Ford
Re: Recording in a 10,000 SqFT warehouse
on Apr 5, 2010 at 5:49:11 pm

they hyper/boom thing depends on how close you can get with the boom and how much ambient noise there is. The quieter the set and the closer you get, the hyper works wins.

At some point the lav wins if you can't get close enough with the hyper.

Think of picking golf clubs for a particular shot.

Regards,

Ty Ford

Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






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David Jones
Re: Recording in a 10,000 SqFT warehouse
on Apr 5, 2010 at 8:28:39 pm

Hi Galen,

I echo (all pun intended) everything Ty has said. I guess if the client's happy, so be it. How important of a project is it? Who is seeing the final product?

As someone I know once said, "Good video + bad audio = bad video".

Best,

Dave J


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Richard Crowley
Re: Recording in a 10,000 SqFT warehouse
on Apr 6, 2010 at 1:39:17 am

"Would you recommend a lav mic over a hyper-cardioid on a boom?"

Maybe. Depends on the hypercard and depends on the lav. And depends on the working distance for each type. Even better might be a "headset" type microphone with the tip mere millimeters from the talent's mouth. The ratio between direct and reflected sound is one method of improving audio in a reverberant environment. The higher you can make this ratio, the less effect the ambient sound has on the recording. The closer the mic is to the mouth, the higher the ratio of direct to ambient sound.

"Would putting up a wall of C-stands and sound blankets help?"

C-stands (or something like them) are only necessary if you don't have anything else to hang sound absorbing material from. If you shoot in the corner of a room, then there are two existing walls to use for backdrop (for video) and for sound control (for audio). Sound blankets are not magic, any similar absorbing material could serve the same purpose. If this were a mattress factory or warehouse, then you have great stacks of sound control devices that could be used. People have found that building temporary walls out of hay bales do a great job, also. You haven't described what this space is used for, so we can only throw out random suggestions that may or may not be of any help in your particular situation.


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