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Changing the soundtrack on live music recording

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Frank Jolley
Changing the soundtrack on live music recording
on Jul 25, 2009 at 9:44:25 pm

Hi. I'm new to this, so please bear with me if what I'm asking is trivial to you experts. I run a folk club and want to record our club nights. The audio recordings from the camcorder are not good enough, so I've got a digital sound recorder which makes excellent sound recordings. I want to remove the sound from the camcorder dvd recording, and replace it with the audio from the digital sound recorder, hopefully maintaining synchronisation. What software should I use - my computer has Windows XP. Thanks for your help.


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Ty Ford
Re: Changing the soundtrack on live music recording
on Jul 26, 2009 at 3:22:27 am

Hello Frank and welcome to the Cow Audio Forum.

You are gambling that the clock of your camera and DVD burning process is the same as that of your audio recording. I'd say you have a 50/50 chance.

Maybe Adobe Premiere for importing your video and then trying to align your audio visually by comparing the waveform of the video to that of your separately recorded audio.

Regards,

Ty Ford

Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






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Frank Jolley
Re: Changing the soundtrack on live music recording
on Jul 26, 2009 at 11:43:47 am

Hi. Thanks for your advice. I've looked up Adobe Premiere, and there seem to be many variants, from Premiere Elements 7, through Pro, to expensive professional versions. Which one would be suitable for me, please? Any other software I should be looking at?
Of course, the other possibility would be to get a camcorder with the audio capabilities of the digital sound recorder. Do such things exist at a sensible price? I haven't bought the camcorder yet, so my options are still open there.
However, the advantages of my first plan would be a) I already have the digital sound recorder, and I'm very pleased with it; and b) possibly cheaper camcorder c) I go to other folk clubs where they do dvds of the show, and I like the idea of making my own sound recordings and dubbing my sound onto their dvds. We're talking about performers' nights here where about 20 amateurs get up and do a spot of 2 numbers each - not professional gigs. They don't mind from an intellectual property point of view - they give permission to do what you want with the dvds, as everyone has contributed to the night's performance.
Thanks again and best regards Frank Ps I enjoyed your Youtube video!


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Ty Ford
Re: Changing the soundtrack on live music recording
on Jul 26, 2009 at 3:22:37 pm

Hi Frank,

How bout one of those camcorders that uses mini DVD discs? I'd get one of them that was expensive enough to have external audio inputs and do the whole thing that way without using your recorder. The recorder requires too many steps.

You could also get a DVD recorder and port your camera right into that.

I so something a bit more upscale than that for some of my clients. We shoot here in my audio studio.
http://www.vimeo.com/5330259

Regards,

TY Ford

Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






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Frank Jolley
Re: Changing the soundtrack on live music recording
on Jul 26, 2009 at 3:51:44 pm

Hi. Thanks - lots of different ideas, all to be followed through. Getting back to the original plan, which version of Adobe Premiere would I need, if wanted to do it that way? Thanks Frank


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Peter Groom
Re: Changing the soundtrack on live music recording
on Jul 27, 2009 at 8:46:10 am

This is what Genlock or ref vid is for.
You need to ensure (before you record) that the sound recorder and the camera(S) are running at EXCATLY the same speed. genlock locks them both to a video reference, or word clock will do it too.

The drifts across digital devices arent nearly as bad a in the old days of analogue tapes , and cassettes etc (laughs) but still over a long period there will be drift.

Another way of addressing this drift woukld be to accept the drift and place a cut between each song on the audio track and resync, and dress the joint.
Whatever way, you need specialised video edit softare for this. Id suggest AVID or Final Cut pro, or pro Tools has video capability built in .
Good luck
peter

Peter


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