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Boom, Mount, Stand Recommendations?

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Jim Bruce
Boom, Mount, Stand Recommendations?
on Jul 13, 2009 at 9:11:33 pm

Hi All,

I recently posted a question about mics and appreciate all the advice. (I'm stuck on the 416 I think. If the Schoeps was a little closer in price I might jump)

Now I'm hoping to get recommendations for accessories for my 416. This is for a documentary film without a budget for a dedicated sound person. I am an editor/producer turning producer/director.

BUDGET: I'm trying for the MIDDLE of the road. I'd like to buy good-performing, solid, reliable, well-built equipment for a reasonable price. But I don't need (and can't afford) the absolute best gear in situations where it's just a subtle difference in performance/slightly lighter, etc...

B&H offers the following OUT OF STOCK (?) kit: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/422105-REG/Sennheiser__Deluxe_Shotgun...

Any thoughts on that combo?

I'm looking to meet 3 sets of conditions:

1) PA holding a boom pole for "live"/ mostly outdoor situations

Cabled Boom Pole - any models recommended? - graphite vs. aluminum? is there a big difference between high end aluminum ($250ish) and low end graphite ($400ish)?
Shockmount - Rycote S Series? Which one?
Windscreen as part of package? Separate? Model?
Any other accessories needed to connect the boom to the mic and/or protect against noise?

2) Camera-mounted on an EX-1

Can I use the same shockmount from the boom and windscreen from above?
Do I need a separate mount? Any models?
Other Accessories?

3) Some kind of fixed boom stand set up for LONG seated interviews

This seems a bit tricky. We will be traveling to a number of different cities (flying and driving). Speed of setup and ease of use is important.

Options I've read about:

Manfrotto 420B - (http://vimeo.com/1958315 and http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/546705-REG/Manfrotto_by_Bogen_Imaging...

This seems affordable, simple and light and easy to tape together with a tripod for carry-on. Would I need any accessories to mount the mic to this?

Boom Mate - with an adapter for a C Stand: hhttp://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/469811-REG/BoomMate__Boompole_Holder_...
I gather you just put the boom right in there? Is this stable? Secure? Recommended?

Any other thoughts for a quick, simple way to place my 416 over a seated interview subject's head for a few hours without killing my female PA?

As always any ideas or recommendations are greatly appreciated.

Regards,

Jim





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David Jones
Re: Boom, Mount, Stand Recommendations?
on Jul 14, 2009 at 1:36:53 am

Hi Jim-

The package from B&H is good but I would also get a Rycote Softie Mount to use with the Softie they included in their package.

[Jim Bruce] "Cabled Boom Pole - any models recommended? - graphite vs. aluminum? is there a big difference between high end aluminum ($250ish) and low end graphite ($400ish)?"

The only real difference in price between different graphite poles has to do with size and cabled vs. non cabled. There's nothing wrong with aluminum poles unless you're planning on having someone hold one for a better part of a day. They ARE heavier than graphites.

[Jim Bruce] "Shockmount - Rycote S Series? Which one?"

I use Rycote windshields for all my mics. I use softies for my MKH-418S & MKH-60, and an S Series for my MKH-70.

I also use the Boommate with a 40" C-Stand for long sit-down interviews. I wouldn't recommend having someone hold a boompole for more than a short interview.

Dave J


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Jim Bruce
Re: Boom, Mount, Stand Recommendations?
on Jul 15, 2009 at 7:41:01 pm

Hi Dave,

Thanks for your reply. A couple of extra questions..

Do you have a particular model of boom pole that you're happy with? Thoughts on the KEG 100CC?

Are you happy with the Boom Mate? It looks kind of flimsy in the picture so I was also considering the "Boom Cradle" for a similar price: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/329191-REG/ATS_RAM_BPC_BOOMPOLE_CRADL...

I guess what seemed attractive about the Mannfroto 420B it was affordable and light enough to travel with so I'd save on about 20 days of lugging/renting a C stand. Maybe I'll see if B and H would let me check one out in person...

Thanks for all your advice.

Jim



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David Jones
Re: Boom, Mount, Stand Recommendations?
on Jul 15, 2009 at 11:10:53 pm

Hi Jim-

[Jim Bruce] "Do you have a particular model of boom pole that you're happy with? Thoughts on the KEG 100CC?"

I use a PSC Elite coiled pole. As far as I can tell, the KEG 100CC looks good. I've never heard anything bad about K-Tek; they're one of the leading boompole companies.

[Jim Bruce] "Are you happy with the Boom Mate? It looks kind of flimsy in the picture so I was also considering the "Boom Cradle" for a similar price: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/329191-REG/ATS_RAM_BPC_BOOMPOLE_CRADL....."

The Boom Mate has never failed me, but I'm not a huge fan of it. The rubber grip that mounts in the C-Stand has come (somewhat) loose. The Boom Cradle looks good but I'm not (as of yet) a fan of using light stands to hold a boom. I would still go with a C-Stand.

Best,
Dave J


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Sam Mallery
Re: Boom, Mount, Stand Recommendations?
on Jul 14, 2009 at 6:28:37 pm

Going backwards...

BoomMate adapter & clamp thing - yes, those would work well with a regular c-stand like this one:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/371907-REG/Impact_CT40M_Turtle_Base_M...

Manfrotto 420B - You would need to figure out how to mount a mic shockmount directly onto this. If you used this with the BoomMate and clamp and a boompole, it would likely be off balance.

Camera mount on a EX-1 - You would not be able to use a Rycote S-Series on a camera. I would use a Pearstone DUSM-1 shockmount and the appropriate Rycote softie for outdoor shooting:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/554681-REG/Pearstone_DUSM_1_DUSM_1_Un...


Windscreen - the S-Seires seems like a good way to go. It would offer more wind protection then the aforementioned Softie.

Shockmount - The S-Series has an integrated shockmount. This and the Pearstone for non-blimp & on-camera work is a good solution.

Cabled Boompole - You get what you pay for. Better poles will usually last longer (if properly taken care of). I spent $500 on my PSC elite because I only wanted to buy a boompole once.

PA handling mic - Be sure to give them the headphone feed from the camera, and be sure that they have a clue about audio.



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Jim Bruce
Re: Boom, Mount, Stand Recommendations?
on Jul 15, 2009 at 8:13:24 pm

Hi Sam,

Just a couple questions...

How does the Boom Mate compare with the Boom Clamp?

And as for the Manfrotto 420B it apparently has a 5/8" female receiver for attaching a MIC.

Is this compatible with either the Pearstone or the Rycote Mounts? Is there a simple adapter to bridge the two?

Last but not least, what's your take on the difference for exteriors between the Pearstone mount and the softie vs. the Rycote S series mount and windscreen?

Thanks for your advice.

Jim



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Sam Mallery
Re: Boom, Mount, Stand Recommendations?
on Jul 16, 2009 at 1:45:34 pm

Jim-

I've never personally usef the BoomMate or the clamp. I own an Impact C-Stand and the ATS-RAM for mounting my boompole. The combination works really well for me. I can position the mic where I want it, set it up and leave it up for days and the damn thing does not budge.

If you end up buying the Sennheiser deluxe kit from B&H, you won't need the Pearstone DUSM. The deluxe kit comes with a Rode shockmount that is very similar to the Pearstone.

The adapter you would need to mount a boompole shockmount (like the Rode or the Pearstone) to a 5/8" thread is this:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/400107-REG/On_Stage_MA_100_MA100_Scre...

Here is a guide that explains what comes with B&H kits:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/find/newsLetter/Audio-kits.jsp

And here's an article about mounting a boompole + working on audio for video when you're unable to hire an experienced sound person:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/find/newsLetter/How-to-Operate-a-Boompole.jsp

And here is an article that explains the difference between using a softie and using a blimp system like the S-Series (just ignore the last paragraph about the WindPac blimp):
Uhh, click here...


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Ty Ford
Re: Boom, Mount, Stand Recommendations?
on Jul 15, 2009 at 1:14:51 pm

JIm,

As regards your choice between a 416 Sennheiser and a Schoeps cmc641. That's sort of like saying you're going to play a round of golf and asking what ONE club to use. You can go around with a driver, but will find your short game and putting will be un-fun. You can use a putter, but your drives and chip shots will be annoying. You can use a sand wedge, but putting and driving will be wonky.

Best of luck with your pursuits.

Regards,

Ty Ford

Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






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Jim Bruce
Re: Boom, Mount, Stand Recommendations?
on Jul 15, 2009 at 7:33:51 pm

Hi Ty,

Thanks for chiming in. I realize looking for just one mic (plus a wired lav) is absurd, but I just don't have the $$$ for both. Trust me I wish that weren't the case!

Do you have a take on the boom mate vs. the boom "cradle" ?(http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/329191-REG/ATS_RAM_BPC_BOOMPOLE_CRADLE_Boompole.html)

Any other recommendation for affordably mounting a mic over the subject for a seated interview?

And how about the K-Tek KEG-100CC with the internal cable?

I had figured the internal cable would be more reliable than my inexperienced PA wrapping an external cable...

Also curious whether you think I should spring for the Rycote S Series Mount and Windscreen in addition to the Pearstone DUSM-1 Universal Shockmount and the "Softie" that would already come in the kit?

I appreciate any thoughts or ideas you might share.

Cheers,

Jim



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Bill Davis
Re: Boom, Mount, Stand Recommendations?
on Jul 16, 2009 at 2:02:40 am

YES! Precisely! What TY said.

This is what all of us who've been doing audio for video for decades are trying to tell everyone here. Over and over and over and over again.

While it's possible for a truely GREAT artist to paint a satisfying painting using nothing but one BLUE magic marker - extremely few do so.

Similarly, any audio professional I've ever worked with would probably prefer to go on a shoot without their PANTS rather than to go out to any important video shoot with ONE shotgun mic.

Personally, I'm not happy on a set unless I'm carrying AT LEAST the following.
2 "sensitive" wired lavs.
2 "general (less sensitive) wired lavs.
2 wireless body packs with receivers.
2 lavs that match the wired "sensitive" mics.
2 lavs that better match the "general" mics.
1 lav that's super small for circumstances when a hidden mic is necessary.
1 boom-ready shotgun.
1 stick-stye lnterview mic.

Back at the office my mic closet has IN ADDITION to these - 2 boom style aerobic type head-worn mics with adaptors for XLR or the body packs.
4 more stick mics for panel interview rigs.
2 PZM boundary mics.
3 large diaphragm dynamic mics for recording LOUD stuff like races and concerts.
2 high quality large diaphragm condenser mics for doing Voiceover work.
3 camera mountable medium or short shotgun mics.
And half a dozen other mics I've used for special purposes at various times in my career for specific tasks.

Does this mean that all these mics are REQUIRED for doing audio for video? Heck no. This is the stuff you accumulate along the way as you learn to solve real world issues related to audio recording.

Other folks will have other needs and other solutions.

The point is that if there was a simple "buy this mic and you can do audio for video" Don't you think that ALL of us who make a living doing this stuff would just save ourself all the hassles and buy that and move along with our careers?

We would - in a heartbeat - trust me.

But a good toolbox acknowledges that ONE HAMMER is inadequate for general purpose home repairs.

And, sorry, but I've got to say that one shogun mic is kinda inadequate for what you're proposing.

Specifically, what if you end up in a hotel room with a noisy air conditioner - that shotgun mic might be a disaster. A lav, or even a head mounted mic placed at the corner of the mouth could improve the signal to noise ratio hugely and get you much better results.

What if you need to work outside and it's windy? A stick mic with excellent handling noise rejection might take 1/3 the time to rig and capture serial interviews properly (like a zillion sports reporters have proved over the years!)

Audio is not today, nor will it ever be, a "buy this thing and you're done" endeavor.

Sorry.







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