FORUMS: list search recent posts

Resolution Isolation filter???

COW Forums : Audio Professionals

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Din noor
Resolution Isolation filter???
on Apr 1, 2009 at 8:11:51 am

Hi,
does anyone know what is an resolution Isolation filter. Is it a metallic type of POP filter..? could anyone advise a brand or model..Basically it will be use for single or duet singers..

thks
Din

be calm & patience.


Return to posts index

Jordan Wolf
Re: Resolution Isolation filter???
on Apr 1, 2009 at 1:15:22 pm

I have never heard of such a thing...in fact, a search on Google resulted ONLY in the link to your two posts on CreativeCow.

I would call what you are thinking of a pop guard/filter or a windscreen. I have two types - one is fabric and the other is metal. The metal one DOES change the character of the voice when used a certain way. Basically, the grooves that are cut into it to allow air to pass through or angled in such a way that the midrange and lows of the voice are made more or less apparent, depending on the windscreen's orientation to the talent and microphone. Here is a link to it.

I hope that helps...maybe you could post a picture or a link to it if the one I gave you isn't what you were talking about.

Wolf
<><


Return to posts index

Din noor
Re: Reflection Isolation filter???
on Apr 2, 2009 at 3:40:50 am

Thank you Wolf,
Gd explanation..FYI: you may want to look into these link too..
http://www.seelectronics.com/rf.html
rgds:
Din

be calm & patience.


Return to posts index


Jordan Wolf
Re: Reflection Isolation filter???
on Apr 2, 2009 at 4:05:35 am

Ah, I see. Interesting.

Wolf
<><


Return to posts index

Ty Ford
Re: Reflection Isolation filter???
on Apr 2, 2009 at 12:07:10 pm

Let's discuss. If seen these for the last year or so, but honestly haven't had the opportunity to try one.

So, it looks like this is partially blocking audio that's arriving from the rear and or sides of the mic. I'm going to presume that the pattern of the mic is directional, though it could be omnidirectional or figure of eight.

Blocking the back side of a directional mic would have little effect; some, but little, because the mic isn't sensitive on that side. If tests were done with a mic in omni or figure of eight pattern, I would expect the outcome to be more dramatic.

Blocking from the side makes more sense, depending on the pattern, because it would actually be keeping sound from the sensitive part of the mic's pattern. For the above reasons, I think you have to look (listen) hard when thinking about the specific pattern of the particular mic to be used here. The devices may make a wide cardioid less wide. But, what if you had a mic with a tighter cardioid pattern? How much would that eliminate the need of the device?

In most normal environments, reflected sound arrives at the mic from may different angles; vertical, diagonal, horizontal and everywhere in between. In live music and in some recordings, you have instruments and amps all playing at the same time. Rudy Van Gelder is an apparent master at recording jazz combos. He relies on mic placement, specifically, careful placement of directional mics to craft his sound stage. Would these devices help him? Hard to say.

I do know that a well-positioned figure of eight mic can null the bejeebers out of nearby sound, just by being positioned to do so.

It sort of comes back to the application. What are you recording? Where are you recording it? Why are you recording it there?

Let's see what we can discover. Let me make a few calls..

Regards,

Ty Ford




Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






Return to posts index

Kevin Paolillo
Re: Resolution Isolation filter???
on Apr 3, 2009 at 2:26:07 am

We recently purchased the Reflexion filter for a series of radio spots we needed to record on location. I was a bit skeptical at first, but I must say it did give us a quieter recording and helped to mitigate the room noise quite a bit. It's not a magic bullet, but it's been a good tool in the kit for us to deliver broadcast quality recordings when conditions are less than ideal. Of course we still use some sound blankets and common sense ( not right under the vent, try to find a room with carpet etc.) to further isolate the talent from the noisy aspects of whatever room we end up in.

We've also used it to record industrial level voiceovers back in the edit suite. Our suite is treated with Auralex panels throughout and noise reducing cabinetry to help with mixing which makes it better than on location, but it's not a professional soundbooth. It sets up quickly as an add on to any standard mic stand, and breaks down just as fast. The larger filter is for voice, the smaller filter is for isolating instruments in a studio recording session. All in all, I'd give it a thumbs up.


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]