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Ryan Krickow
Production Sound Workflow
on Dec 16, 2008 at 7:26:21 pm

I was wondering if someone could help me fill in the blanks concerning the production sound workflow for a feature being shot dual system on the Red One Camera. Here are the main points of my plan...

Record Broadcast WAV Mono Files (BWF-M) at 24bit 48kHz. (Use Mono files since Polyphonic files are not acceptable in the iXML workflow to Pro Tools) Record 1 separate file per channel (I'm not sure this is necessary-any thoughts?). The Scene, Shot, and Take numbers are to be embedded into the filename (Example: 27-01A-02.BWF). If possible, use a Time Code Slate that supports 23.98 Time Code. Jam sync with camera’s TOD timecode.

One thing I'd like to find out is how the production sound mixer passes the files (assuming it's recorded digitally) off to the editor. Is it possible to have them load their clips onto the drives that the Red Tech is using to backup the footage? That way when one of the drives is brought to the editor at the end of the day they can transfer both Picture and Sound. Also, is there a preferred program for converting BWF files into a format that works with FCP and once you get it in FCP is it best to batch export and work with QuickTime .mov files? Finally, how many tracks are usually used while recording, my understanding is that there is one mixed track (for the editor) and various unmixed tracks for use by the sound designer/mixer. If you know of any detailed production sound workflow charts I could check out I would really appreciate it. Thanks everyone, Ryan


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Ty Ford
Re: Production Sound Workflow
on Dec 17, 2008 at 12:42:25 am

Hello Ryan and welcome to the Cow Audio Forum.

I don't have all the answers, but I have imported polywave files into Pro Tools LE, up to eight tracks at a time. I got 18 into FCP last year while testing it.

How you transfer files depends on what you recorded them on. I use a Sound Devices 744T. It has a firewire port. I connect the 744T to a computer and then turn on the 744T. The computer sees the 744T as a hard drive. Drag and drop the files from the 744T to the computer HD. Eject the 744T from teh computer. Power down the 744T and disconnect the firewire cable.

Regards,

Ty

Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






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Ryan Krickow
Re: Production Sound Workflow
on Dec 17, 2008 at 11:13:16 am

Thanks Ty! If I can ask you a few more questions I'd really appreciate it. One simple question... each channel on a field recorder can record 2 tracks, correct? I assume this is a stereo recording and if you just want to record a single mono track I can. Second, are the BWFs saved as separate files for each channel or each track? Is there a choice? For a film would you include the scene, shot, take, and track number in the file name (example: 27-01A-01-T2)? Third, would I want to jam sync the camera to the field recorder's TOD timecode or would I want to jam sync both the field recorder and camera to a smart slate if we have one? Finally, how are the audio dailies usually delivered to the editor--by Data DVD or hard drive, correct? Thanks again, Ryan



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Ty Ford
Re: Production Sound Workflow
on Dec 17, 2008 at 2:22:38 pm

[Ryan Krickow] "Thanks Ty! If I can ask you a few more questions I'd really appreciate it. One simple question... each channel on a field recorder can record 2 tracks, correct?

>No, just one.

I assume this is a stereo recording and if you just want to record a single mono track I can.

> You need two tracks for stereo.

Second, are the BWFs saved as separate files for each channel or each track? Is there a choice?

> Some recorders operate in polywave mode, allowing multiple tracks to be recorded into one time-stamped file. If polywave is not supported, you get multiple iso tracks. The number of tracks recordable varies with each piece of gear.

For a film would you include the scene, shot, take, and track number in the file name (example: 27-01A-01-T2)?

> Maybe. Ask the guys in post if they have a preference.

Third, would I want to jam sync the camera to the field recorder's TOD timecode or would I want to jam sync both the field recorder and camera to a smart slate if we have one?

>You have entered the fringe of my experience. DIfferent cameras and recorders vary in their clock accuracy. I think a good smart slate would help you but may not be entirely necessary.

Finally, how are the audio dailies usually delivered to the editor--by Data DVD or hard drive, correct? Thanks again, Ryan"


>One or the other, depending on what sound and post want and/or have the capability for.

Regards,

Ty Ford



Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






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Ryan Krickow
Re: Production Sound Workflow
on Dec 18, 2008 at 11:09:24 am

This has been such a huge help! I just need to clear up a couple more things if possible. Can I get both a mono polywave mixed track and individual ISO tracks from the production mixer? As far as timecode I've read that I should use 29.97 NDF on the field recorder and jam sync the camera's (shooting at 23.98) timecode with it, is that correct? It seems more practical to run the field recorder at 23.98 but I'm not very knowledgeable in this area. I don't know if the fact that this is an HD project makes any difference when it comes to timecode. Finally, when I go to deliver the audio to the sound designer would I give them an OMF of the cut mono polywave mixed track as well as a HDD containing all the individual ISO tracks?

Happy Holidays Ty,

Ryan



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Ty Ford
Re: Production Sound Workflow
on Dec 18, 2008 at 1:23:49 pm

Ryan Krickow] "This has been such a huge help! I just need to clear up a couple more things if possible. Can I get both a mono polywave mixed track and individual ISO tracks from the production mixer?

>>Hello Ryan,
I don't think there is such a thing as a mono polywave. Poly indicates more than one. If the mixer and recording device have enough inputs, outputs and tracks, you could have a mono or stereo mix plus iso tracks in one polywave file.

As far as timecode I've read that I should use 29.97 NDF on the field recorder and jam sync the camera's (shooting at 23.98) timecode with it, is that correct? It seems more practical to run the field recorder at 23.98 but I'm not very knowledgeable in this area. I don't know if the fact that this is an HD project makes any difference when it comes to timecode.

>>I don't know. Check with postproduction. See what they want. If this is for a long form TV show, I *think* they use 29.97 DF here in the US, but again, ask them.

Finally, when I go to deliver the audio to the sound designer would I give them an OMF of the cut mono polywave mixed track as well as a HDD containing all the individual ISO tracks? "

>>That depends on what you want them to do with the files. Would they need the ISO tracks for something? Will their system accept OMF? Again, questions for them.

Regards,

Ty Ford



Want better production audio?: Ty Ford's Audio Bootcamp Field Guide






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