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mic rubbing on clothes - how to remove?

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TalbotGrad
mic rubbing on clothes - how to remove?
on Aug 3, 2007 at 6:33:26 pm

I've got a show where the host's mic was rubbing on clothing.
I've solved this for future shoots, but now I must get this noise out or reduce it to edit the show.
Unfortunately, the rubbing occurs at times when he is also talking and lowering the mic noise also lowers his voice.

What EQ/Filter/plug-in does this best job reducing this problem?

Thanks

Larry



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Peter Groom
Re: mic rubbing on clothes - how to remove?
on Aug 3, 2007 at 7:22:01 pm

You could probably sweep a sharp Q eq filter to find the best reduction on the rubbing noise, but this would more than likely severely impact on the speech also.
I think (presuming that adr isnt an option which is how youd normally get round this) that youll most likely have to live with it and make sure it never re occurs. You may be able to get rid of some by finding other occasions where he says an affected word and replacing it but far from ideal.
Is adr out of the question?
Peter


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TalbotGrad
Re: mic rubbing on clothes - how to remove?
on Aug 3, 2007 at 9:15:32 pm

No it's not out of the question if I grovel a bit.
Embarassing yes.

I'll try some filtering first

Thanks

Larry



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lee grainge
Re: mic rubbing on clothes - how to remove?
on Aug 4, 2007 at 12:16:55 pm

It might be useful if you give some specs. into what tools you actually have now. Or will you have to go out and spend?
There are many NR's out there (see waves.com restoration pack) - that can filter out certain artifacts.
If it really is bad then EQ will help but only slightly.
If you have another 'take' then some time - stretching/pulling could help. If you go down this road then try and cut the dialogue in Syllables IE; - wat - er is floo - ding - This way it will hopefully be easier to cut the dials correctly with minimum time changes.


If you go down the ADR road then make sure you use the same MIC.

Good luck!


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Alan Lacey
Re: mic rubbing on clothes - how to remove?
on Aug 11, 2007 at 11:31:52 am

For the non-pros amougst us, kindly what is adr? a reshoot presumably?

Alan


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Mark Suszko
Re: mic rubbing on clothes - how to remove?
on Aug 13, 2007 at 7:01:35 am

Automatic Dialog Replacement, aka "looping". Though when I do it there's nothing much "automatic" about it:-) The name comes from the way they used to do it: the actor that had to re-say the line was in a booth looking at a spliced repeating loop of film for the scene in question. They'd watch the mouth and body movements, often listening to the original sound thru headphones, then on cue, would try to speak the new lines as well as possible to match the old. The recording from that was laid back in the place of the original and since the tiings were the same, it automatically fell into place.

When I have to do something like this, such as when dubbing a Spanish track alongside existing English footage, I find some people "get it" and can do it by watching the monitor and listening, and some are just too thrown by the picture and can only do it by listening and speaking along. Still others are too thrown by the process, which is a little like patting your head and rubbing your tummy at the same time, and the only thing that works there is to time the segment and then get them to do alternate reads against a stop watch until you get enough takes that are at or under the time limit to edit together and do the final re-alignment in post.

ADR was very big in Europe for many years after the war (and seemingly remains so in India) because of a shortage of affordable and compact and good location audio gear, and the crowded nature of the country meant you just could not escape a lot of interrupting noise in the field.

It became almost a creative style to depend on for some Europeans instead of a repair tool. It was not seen the same way in the States, where it was mainly considered a repair technique. Orson Welles was a famous and frequent user of ADR in his movies; since he had lots of expertise in dramatic radio work, this came more naturally to him. He used it as an opportunity to tweak and tune all the actor's vocal performances and line readings.

In fact, he first shot " The Magnificent Ambersons" around a completely pre-recorded audio track, painstakingly edited together from many recordings of the cast in perfect booth conditions. The idea was to play the lines back on the actual set during filming, and have all the actors lip synch to it. The theory Orson had was, they could concentrate more on their acting and body language if the lines were already perfect, and the noisy dollies and cranes Orson wanted to use for dramatic angles, and the squeaky fans and what-not of the more primitive soundstages would no longer be a deciding factor.

It worked great on paper, but it proved too challenging to pull off in practice: the actors had a hard time acting this way, and the on-location playback technology and acoustics of the sets created challenges that could not be overcome in time. So after a few days of thrashing with this, they gave it up and shot the whole thing conventionally.

Ironically today, the technique is heavily used in the kinds of theatrical shows you see in theme parks and some museums, particularly anything that requires a lot of running around on the set, or that requires a lot of performers with varying skill levels to take shifts doing the same pre-timed acting to choreographed practical effects work, where the timing is everything, and the quality of the speaking needs to be super high and consistent.



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Alan Lacey
Re: mic rubbing on clothes - how to remove?
on Aug 13, 2007 at 2:10:02 pm

Thanks for such an interesting post Mark.

If fact I had to do something similar myself last year when the wrong person was mic'ed for a short two person interview. I got the interviwer back to the booth and rerecorded three questions.

It fitted back perfectly.

Alan


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lee grainge
Re: mic rubbing on clothes - how to remove?
on Aug 16, 2007 at 2:58:34 pm

For more furhter reading regarding ADR / Looping

"ADR stands for "Automated" or "Automatic" Dialog Replacement. "

http://filmsound.org/terminology/adr.htm

Cheers.


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