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Explain Audio Mixer

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launch
Explain Audio Mixer
on Oct 25, 2005 at 3:54:38 am

Hello,

I currently have

AUDIO
2 Sennheiser lapel mics and two Sennheiser ME 66.

CAMERA
1 Pd170P and a DSR 250.

My question is how would i monitor and record the audio from the 4 mics so that in editing i could have the video and audio match up.

The filming would be taking place in a busy resturant and there would be a mix of ambient sound and interviews.

Any assistance would be very helpful.

Cheers,
Steve


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David Jones
Re: Explain Audio Mixer
on Oct 25, 2005 at 6:21:27 pm

I don't want to come off sounding like a pompous ass,
but you might want to think about hiring a competent audio tech for you TV show.


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Ryan
Re: Explain Audio Mixer
by
on Oct 26, 2005 at 1:54:04 am

I would simply plug two mics into one camera and two into the other and record them as seperate channels. Have your camera people wear headphones and monitor the levels. Then all the tracks will be seperate for you to do whatever you want with them.

Or follow the other person's advice and hire a professional.

Without knowing what you are shooting for or the budget that you can work with you will be limited as to the answers you receive. Just a tip.


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launch
Re: Explain Audio Mixer
on Oct 26, 2005 at 2:11:05 am

Thanks guys,

I do understand that I need to be more exact about what questions I am asking. At this stage I'm still in the dark about budgets and the rest.

I just wanted to know what was a bare minium to achieve good results. From my experience I find it hard to mix/monitor two tracks of audio while filming on the run, by the time you hear the audio over peak it's too late to do anything about it??

Although it is for a community Tv channel I still what to achieve the best results I can with a limited budget.

Hiring equipment looks like it might be a better idea?

Can you recommend equipment if I could hire anything i wanted??


Thanx for your help,(hopefully i can get some more exact numbers and sizes of crews shortly)

Steve


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Brian B
Re: Explain Audio Mixer
on Oct 26, 2005 at 11:09:58 pm

Well if your looking at renting equipment you might look into a camera that has 4 audio inputs on it to help make the day go a little easier for the audio person.

If your going to rent a camera with this scenario then get two of the same. It will help out with continuity in the edit.
You can easily apply the same color correction and what ever other effects you go with in post.

OK OK back to audio.
If you stay with the two camera's you have and want to just rent some audio equipment. Then take a look at a good mixer Sound Devices 444 would be great (4 in's / 2 outs).
and run the two outs to one of the cameras. With that you will definately need someone to monitor the outputs of the mixer and camera, since you will be married to the live mix to the camera.

Hope this helps out I could go on and on but I'll save your time form that.



Brian B
Editor
Avid|DS
http://www.trueindiefilms.com
http://www.lithia.com


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launch
Re: Explain Audio Mixer
on Oct 27, 2005 at 1:24:49 am

Cheers Brain,

Is it possible to use a small mixer or VU meter to attach to the camera and the let camera guy monitor two lines of audio?

Then take a look at a good mixer Sound Devices 444 would be great (4 in's / 2 outs).
and run the two outs to one of the cameras.



To your response how would one camera be able to receive all four lines of audio?


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Don Greening
Re: Explain Audio Mixer
on Oct 27, 2005 at 7:37:33 am

[launch] "To your response how would one camera be able to receive all four lines of audio?
"


If you're referring to the mixer suggested, there are 4 mic inputs into the mixer and 2 outputs going to the camera from the mixer. If you're referring to cameras that have 4 audio input channels, there are many. The Canon XL series of MiniDV camcorders is one example where you can record 4 audio channels at the same time with individual on-camera gain controls.

But as the other replies have pointed out, if you go the mixer route you'll need to have a dedicated operator to ride the gain controls during the recording, as you will have enough on your plate just operating one of your cameras. If you decide not to use an inline mixer you can split the audio equally between your PD170 and the DSR250, thereby keeping all channels separate for editing individually in post. Both ways described have their advantages and disadvantages.

- Don



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