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exporting my timeline without compression

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Walter Wallace
exporting my timeline without compression
on Aug 11, 2017 at 6:12:58 pm

Is there any way to export my workflow timeline in a lossless way? I dont want to have double compression when exporting to youtube.

Thanks!


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Duke Sweden
Re: exporting my timeline without compression
on Aug 11, 2017 at 6:18:15 pm

DNxHD codec, for one. There are a few lossless, uncompressed codecs available in Media Encoder (as well as Premiere pro).

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Ann Bens
Re: exporting my timeline without compression
on Aug 11, 2017 at 6:20:31 pm

Whatever codec you choose: Youtube re-encodes.

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Daniel Waldron
Re: exporting my timeline without compression
on Aug 14, 2017 at 1:49:06 am

Pro Res or DNxHD are supposed to be visually lossless, but are actually still being compressed into their respective codecs. Quicktime Animation or TIFF sequence are technically lossless, but will give you massive files.


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Jorn Bergmans
Re: exporting my timeline without compression
on Aug 14, 2017 at 11:57:31 am

Exporting your timeline to a codec that is truly uncompressed is very inefficient in most cases. (They produce giant files)
Depending on your source footage, and the way you handled these files during postproduction, your highest quality is whatever your highest workflow setting is. So, for mastering, 'all you need' is a high enough quality codec to keep your data and 'look' intact, so that file can be used to create your deliverables.

As mentioned, the best options for this currently are codecs like ProRes422/ProRes4444 (Apple) or DNxHR (made by Avid, good mastering codec for Windows based sets) - these codecs are technically lossy (but visually barely noticable), but will give you an optimal mix between high quality and decent file size.

As Ann Bens mentioned, YouTube will always re-encode your file. To save yourself a lot of upload time, there's a few tips in the upload specs.
https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/4603579?hl=en
I'd recommend reading the much clearer Vimeo specs, too. They are good to keep as a bookmark!
https://vimeo.com/help/compression

My suggestion would be something similar to this for HD video:
h.264 - main/high profile, level 4.1, 12-15 mbit/s VBR 1-pass
aac audio, 160-192kbps, 48kHz (assuming this is what was mixed), stereo
This would be an .mp4 file - under the h.264 format option in the export settings for Pr / AME

I'd suggest exporting a master file (ProRes or DNxHR), then encoding that file to these suggested settings before uploading the .mp4


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