FORUMS: list search recent posts

Cutting together a before/after schene in background. Lining up humans - Best to use morph cut? Filming Tips

COW Forums : Adobe Premiere Pro

<< PREVIOUS   •   FAQ   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Richard Zellmer
Cutting together a before/after schene in background. Lining up humans - Best to use morph cut? Filming Tips
on Apr 18, 2017 at 8:19:06 pm

I am going to film an auto repair video where I remove the bumper and headlights of the car. It will take us a few hours to do the work but I want to be talking in front of the car and snap my fingers and jump to the after.

I plan to tape marks on the ground and not move camera but how can I make the jump look as smooth as possible. Would a morph cut make sense when I am changing the background by design but want the human transition to look smooth?

less of an adobe question, is there any filming technique that I can use to see that I am in the same position when I film the second segment?


Return to posts index

Alex Udell
Re: Cutting together a before/after schene in background. Lining up humans - Best to use morph cut? Filming Tips
on Apr 19, 2017 at 2:34:56 pm
Last Edited By Alex Udell on Apr 19, 2017 at 4:59:35 pm

hmmm....not an expert here....

if you had a outboard video switcher that support a freeze frame

you could freeze frame and hold a take


and them dissolve or split between that freeze and your 2nd take for the line up in an external monitor...

you could always rent one for the shoot....

A Newtek Tricaster would probably work well in this scenario.

hth,

Alex Udell
Editing, Motion Graphics, and Visual FX
Let's Connect on Linkedin
Examples: Retail Automotive Motion Graphics Spots
Example: Customer Facing Explainer Video
Example: Infotainment & Package editorial


Return to posts index

Blaise Douros
Re: Cutting together a before/after schene in background. Lining up humans - Best to use morph cut? Filming Tips
on Apr 21, 2017 at 12:08:02 am

You could always bring in a greenscreen to place behind yourself on-set, shoot it against that so the lighting conditions are identical, and then just composite the result over two background plates that you shoot of the car. Heck, you could even shoot a timelapse, and talk over the process while the sped-up version is happening in the background!

Alternately, make sure there's a good amount of space between you and the car, and use a splitscreen type effect.

There is absolutely no way you will be able to perfectly reposition the camera so that the frame doesn't jump, no matter what tools you use to view the images. I suggest leaving it set up in place--maybe shoot that sequence on a B-camera that you can leave set up so that you can still capture the process on your A camera.


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]