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Exporting 2.39 film to 16:9 anamorphic

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mandy brown
Exporting 2.39 film to 16:9 anamorphic
on Feb 17, 2017 at 7:41:14 pm

Hi,

I edited a film in 2.39 and need to export it as 16:9 anamorphic (squeezed). What is the best workflow? And what settings should I use?

Thanks for your help!
Mandy


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Dave LaRonde
Re: Exporting 2.39 film to 16:9 anamorphic
on Feb 17, 2017 at 7:46:14 pm

What are the delivery specifications? If you don't have any, you should.

Dave LaRonde
Promotion Producer
KGAN (CBS) & KFXA (Fox) Cedar Rapids, IA


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mandy brown
Re: Exporting 2.39 film to 16:9 anamorphic
on Feb 17, 2017 at 7:53:46 pm

Hi Dave,

Below are the delivery specs I received. They all make sense, but I don't know how to export anamorphic. By the way, the footage is 2048x860.

• Quicktime movie in native resolution (HD 1920 x 1080, minimum resolution of 720 x 480/NTSC) • Uncompressed, ProRes (HQ) Codecs (preferred), H.264 (acceptable)
• Animation Codec for animation only
• Keyframes on the frame rate – 24 for 24fps (preferred), 23.98 and/or 29.97 (acceptable)
• Aspect Ratio should be 16:9. We understand your film might be in 1.85:1 or 2.39:1 or 4:3 as an aesthetic choice, but please conform your video file to 16:9 before delivering to us. If you do not, we will conform the video file ourselves at our discretion. When conforming the video files on your end, please be sure to make it anamorphic.
• Minimum bit-rate of 700Kb/s
• Please always indicate the frame rate and aspect ratio on your media • For SD widescreen content (which we do not prefer), clips should be "anamorphic" (squeezed), but letterboxing will also work. For 4:3 content in SD, just send it full frame, there is no need to letterbox or squeeze. For 4:3 content in HD, please pillarbox your video
• Make sure that your clips are not encoded with a proprietary codec from your capture card or editing system, as we likely won’t be able to open these


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John Pale
Re: Exporting 2.39 film to 16:9 anamorphic
on Feb 20, 2017 at 1:33:31 am

Seems like they want to fill the 16:9 frame without letterboxing.

Bring the film into a 1920 x 1080 sequence, then resize it. You need to resize height and width separately since your film is not 16:9 (its wider!) , so you need to uncheck the box in the transform controls that forces them to be locked together. Resize the width to fit the 1920 frame EXACTLY, then do the same for the height. The film will look squeezed. They are asking for anamorphic, so this is what they seem to want. It will be unsqueezed by the projector. Export the sequence as ProRes HQ 1920 x 1080. 23.976 aka 23.98 fps, if thats what it is, or 24 if thats what it is.

If you are hesitant, why not ask them if they will accept a short test file from you?


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mandy brown
Re: Exporting 2.39 film to 16:9 anamorphic
on Feb 20, 2017 at 2:54:47 am

Sending a test is a great idea. I wasn't sure if the projector would be able to desqueeze it properly if I manually adjust the frame settings, without adjusting the pixel aspect ratio? Does anamorphic mean it needs to have a rectangular pixel or is square pixel ok?

Appreciate your help, John!


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John Pale
Re: Exporting 2.39 film to 16:9 anamorphic
on Feb 20, 2017 at 4:07:03 pm

You are effectively altering the pixel size when you squeeze everything in the timeline. Everything looks squeezed when using square pixels.

1920 x 1080 HD is square pixels always. There are no anamorphic presets, which is why I think they intend to stretch it back out in the projector.

There are HD formats that use anamorphic pixels (DVC PRO HD, HDV), but they are not 1920 x 1080.

I have received squeezed stuff for editing many times, and when I unsqueeze it in the edit, it appears in the proper aspect ratio (letterboxed) in a 16:9 frame. I have not been asked to deliver that way before, which is why I suggested you send them a test. Best to be sure before giving them the whole film.


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