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Kamuz Raphael
Picture quality
on Dec 8, 2011 at 7:57:34 am

Hi all
I'm in the middle developing my feature film and its an independent production and that means the budget is more than tight. Anyway, I would like some advise on what decisions one makes in terms of the picture quality from production to post production. I'm filming on a Canon 5D and hopefully show it in film festivals, my only worry, from my last project is that when the film is projected on a big screen the picture looks nothing close to HD quality.
Any pointers will be highly appreciated.

Thanks


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Steve Crow
Re: Picture quality
on Dec 8, 2011 at 6:02:58 pm

There's not a lot to go on here but my first rather off the cuff thought is that the problem you saw was more due to the projector than to anything you did in production or editing. If it looked good on your computer then the question becomes why didn't it look equally good when projected and I'm thinking that maybe the projector wasn't capable of projecting HD videos at full resolution or was low powered in terms of its light output.


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Liam Hall
Re: Picture quality
on Dec 8, 2011 at 9:44:33 pm

[Steve Crow] " If it looked good on your computer then the question becomes why didn't it look equally good when projected"

Resolution. A cinema screen is a little bit bigger than a computer screen...

Liam Hall
Director/DoP/Editor
http://www.liamhall.net


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Steve Crow
Re: Picture quality
on Dec 8, 2011 at 10:19:28 pm

Good point Liam and it got me thinking of the arguments that went on for years over on the still photography side - how many digital megapixels does it take to match the quality of old fashioned 35mm film?

On the movie side there's long been controversy over what the equivalent resolution of old school celluloid film stock is/was - I'm thinking of the kinds of films that were projected in movie houses for at least the past 40/50 years before the digital revolution began

I haven't heard any definitive numbers but I think it's safe to assume it's greater than even 1920x1080 HD videos. But is the "real" number a 2K resolution, a 4K or some even greater number?

Whatever that number turns out to be, while you can use a software-based mathematical "up sampling" tool to fake an increased resolution - can it really double, triple or even quadruple the resolution of the original source video with results that look as good as old fashioned celluloid films? I don't know the answer to that but I would think in most cases the results would be soft and not the same quality as a film shot natively at that increased resolution.

Surely that kind of up sampling process must be super expensive as well at the professional quality level.

Assuming that the resolution difference/screen size issue is the only thing going on here (in terms of the orignal poster's situation) there's not really that much that can be done, is there?


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Steve Crow
Re: Picture quality
on Dec 8, 2011 at 10:29:30 pm

Oh one last thought, even if you did somehow increase the video resolution to say 4K - what are the chances the original poster would have access to a 4K digital cinema projector costing God knows how much.

We've all seen and heard of even VHS and Mini-DV footage being projected on movie screens - and the results are not that great but it can be done and people do live with it.


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Peter Burger
Re: Picture quality
on Dec 8, 2011 at 11:27:07 pm

[Steve Crow] "We've all seen and heard of even VHS and Mini-DV footage being projected on movie screens - and the results are not that great but it can be done and people do live with it."

Maybe it's a bit out of topic, but I'm with you Steve! Back in the good(?) old days of miniDV we had a lot of screenings in movie-theaters of our SD-films. Sometimes as a kind of supporting movie for "real" 35mm movies.
And for us it was the same thing every time:
First the big shock! "Oh my god, it looks terrible"
Then, after a few minutes, we didn't even notice the low resolution anymore.

It's all about the story! And when talking about pure picture quality on a budget: IMHO DSLRs are the way to go today. And: "Yes, I know, the Canons native resolution is not really 'real' 1080p but more like blown-up 720p".
But it's as close as you can get.

*Enter Jason waving his GH2* ;)

------------------------------------------
"Tragedy is a close-up; comedy, a long shot." - Buster Keaton


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Jason Jenkins
Re: Picture quality
on Dec 9, 2011 at 12:05:03 am

[Peter Burger] "*Enter Jason waving his GH2* ;)"

Huh...who...GH-what...??

Jason Jenkins
Flowmotion Media
Video production... with style!

Check out my Mormon.org profile.


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Neil Patience
Re: Picture quality
on Dec 8, 2011 at 7:39:05 pm

Could you explain a little more about your post production process how did you edit ? grade? which codec ?
What type of file and at what size / codec did you use for the projection ?

best wishes
Neil
http://www.patience.tv


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Kamuz Raphael
Re: Picture quality
on Dec 9, 2011 at 10:27:20 am

It was edited in Apple proress HQ ( 1920*1080), there wasn't much grading just little brightens and contrast adjustments in FCP). I then exported a quick time file of the sequence to DVD studio as .H264 for DVD authoring. The QT file was about 30GB ( approximately).
On the big cinema screen the colors looked were a bit off.


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Steve Crow
Re: Picture quality
on Dec 9, 2011 at 4:26:39 pm

Well its no wonder then Dvds are standard resolution mpeg2 files so they cant look as good as your original high definition source video

Play it straight off the computer for a much better look


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John Frey
Re: Picture quality
on Dec 9, 2011 at 6:08:05 pm

Output to BluRay, not DVD. But then, BluRay does not appear to be in the Apple scheme of things.

John D. Frey
25 Year owner/operator of two California-based production studios.

Digital West Video Productions of San Luis Obispo and Inland Images of Lake Elsinore


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