FORUMS: list search recent posts

Newbie question: DOF and ND filters on 5D

COW Forums : DSLR Video

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Arvid Utas
Newbie question: DOF and ND filters on 5D
on Nov 25, 2010 at 11:46:49 am

Hello all,
I am going to do my first shoot on the Canon 5D soon and as I google around it appears it doesn't have a built in ND filter. So what can you do to get a shallow depth of field? (except buying ND-filters to attach to the lens which is an option that I am considering but I'd like to know if there are options...)
Would ISO50 do the trick? (what is the ISO equivalent of, say a Sony V1?)

Many thanks pros!
Arvid


Return to posts index

Noah Kadner
Re: Newbie question: DOF and ND filters on 5D
on Nov 25, 2010 at 2:24:42 pm

You can use ISO to take the place of an ND filter- though it results in inconsistent footage and is sometimes not enough to allow you to shoot at a fast enough aperture for shallow depth of field, for example in direct sunlight. ND filters are not that expensive- get some.

Noah

Unlock the secrets of 24p, HD and Final Cut Studio with Call Box Training. Featuring the Canon 5D Mark II and 7D.


Return to posts index

Phil Balsdon
Re: Newbie question: DOF and ND filters on 5D
on Nov 25, 2010 at 9:19:58 pm

A Fader ND will allow you to dial in a precise exposure and retain a consistent f stop and ISO setting.
Buy one that fits your largest lens and then step rings in sizes suitable to fit it to all your smaller lenses.
Buy a reputable quality one not a budget copy which may have poor optical quality glass.
http://www.lightcraftworkshop.com

Cinematographer, Steadicam Operator, Final Cut Pro Post Production.
http://www.steadi-onfilms.com.au/


Return to posts index


Michael Sacci
Re: Newbie question: DOF and ND filters on 5D
on Nov 25, 2010 at 10:22:05 pm

To clear things up a bit the ND doesn't give you shallow DoF, a large aperture it the main way to get it. The ND helps you control the exposure. If you are outside there is no way to open up the aperture way the way and reduce the amount of light hitting the sensor with video. With still you can raise the shutter speed to 1/2000 or more of a second but you don't have that option in video.

But I think there are 2 must haves for shooting video on a DSLR (especially for outside), one is a Viewfinder for the LCD and a FaderND filter. The FaderND is a not only great for getting the shallow DOF it is the best way to speed up general exposure control, I won't go outside without one. It is the way I "iris" up and down when shooting.


Return to posts index

Arvid Utas
Re: Newbie question: DOF and ND filters on 5D
on Nov 26, 2010 at 4:44:45 pm

Right, so buying an ND filter it is.

You mentioned the shutter speed and normally I wouldn't be faster than say 1/60th but is there any difference when using DSLR? I was at a DSLR shoot where the operator kept on changing the shutter speed but I've always been told that you need a bit of exposure time to make the frames flow together (unless you want that bespoke Saving private ryan effect).

So to clarify my question, is there any difference between DSLR and video/film on the use of shutter speed?

(shooting 24 or 25fps)

Many thanks all


Return to posts index

Phil Balsdon
Re: Newbie question: DOF and ND filters on 5D
on Nov 26, 2010 at 9:47:38 pm

To simulate the look of film your shutter speed should be double the frame rate. ie at 25fps shutter should be set to 1/50th (at 24fps on a DSLR 1/50th is as close as you can get). This gives the same effect as the 180 degree shutter in a film camera gate, when the gate (shutter) needs to be closed for the film to advance one frame.

Adjusting the shutter to greatly faster speeds will give you an exposure of say 1/1000th of a second but it will be displayed on the screen for the same duration as your frame rate, say 1/24th second. This becomes a problem especially if you are panning or tilting because with the reduced motion blur of the normal shutter speed it will show up as severe strobing in the shot. (Lot of sharp edges rapidly jumping across the frame). This actually maybe a desirable effect if you want to slow footage down and see precise detail of a subject in the frame though.

So yes there is a big difference that needs to be taken into consideration between the use of shutter speed for still and video.

A Fader ND allows far more versatile adjustment of exposure for a set aperture than regular NDs that come in increments of .3 or 1 stop which means you often need to load two or more together to get the desired exposure. Here in the bright light of Australia I often find myself needing to reduce the exposure by 5 or more stops which is much more convenient when you simply have to rotate the filter on the front of the lens. It also means you can get away with only buying one filter.

Cinematographer, Steadicam Operator, Final Cut Pro Post Production.
http://www.steadi-onfilms.com.au/


Return to posts index


Michael Sacci
Re: Newbie question: DOF and ND filters on 5D
on Nov 26, 2010 at 11:50:00 pm

[Phil Balsdon] "It also means you can get away with only buying one filter."

To add to that thought, I get the biggest filter thread size needed for my lenses and then step up rings for smaller lens. Example, I have 58mm thread for Canon lenses and then 52mm for Nikon primes, all the Nikons have step up rings to give them a 58mm thread ( I get new caps so the rings are always on the lenses.) so I just have the one 58mm FaderND.


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]