FORUMS: list search recent posts

light meter suggestions

COW Forums : DSLR Video

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
David Tannenbaum
light meter suggestions
on Nov 9, 2010 at 5:47:56 pm

I started off in photography and used a meter all the time. Once I started doing video I stopped using a meter. I am thinking of going back to using a meter.

I am interested in getting more control and consitentcy of my lighting ratios.

Is there a difference between meters for still photography and video?

Any good suggestions for light meters for video use


Return to posts index

Norman Pogson
Re: light meter suggestions
on Nov 9, 2010 at 6:03:46 pm

I have a Sekonic L-358, I bought it for studio flash for still photography and it works extremely well. It will also work in cine mode for filmmaking and I have used it a couple of times on set for double checking ratios. I have just got to know my lights and camera well that I now eyeball the light ratios for stills and movies.

My Website


Return to posts index

David Jones
Re: light meter suggestions
on Nov 9, 2010 at 8:29:55 pm

I used to have the 358, too! I used it for studio lighting set-ups.

A cinematographer friend of mine has always used this one: http://www.filmtools.com/l758c.html (though, a few models back , I think). It's a great meter but as you can see, a little pricey. Most are that are designed for cine/video.

Best,

Dave J


Return to posts index


Bill Davis
Re: light meter suggestions
on Nov 10, 2010 at 1:11:26 am

Once upon a time, video making was a profession, populated by professionals who used professional tools.

Likewise Photography (beyond the snap shooter) was a profession.

Pros in photography nearly always used light meters. Made sense since you couldn't SEE the results until your film was developed.

Pros, however, in video NEVER used light meters. Why? Because pro cameras nearly always came with a FREE tool that made light meters completely unnecessary. They were called Zebra stripes. Since the video practitioner had a LIVE picture to judge visually, and could with a simple switch, set zebras to indicate typical exposures (like 70ire for skin tones) there was NO NEED to carry a device to tell one what one could see for themselves in the viewfinder.

Today, with the advent of CONSUMER style camcorders that don't have zebras - one might argue that carrying a light meter would once again make sense.

However - the moment you develop your practice to the point where you move BEYOND consumer and prosumer cameras - YOU GET ZEBRAS! And your light meter can go back to the drawer.

Use any tools you like, but for those coming from Photography into video - this is the basics of why you seldom see a pro videographer carrying a light meter. It's simply unnecessary.

YMMV.



Return to posts index

Michael Sacci
Re: light meter suggestions
on Nov 10, 2010 at 1:59:02 am

[Bill Davis] "YOU GET ZEBRAS! And your light meter can go back to the drawer."
You have zebras on your DSLR camera?

I would say cinematographers use meters all the time. If you are setting lights they help to get the ratios you want in your frame.


Return to posts index

Norman Pogson
Re: light meter suggestions
on Nov 10, 2010 at 1:38:30 pm

It's not about exposure like the zebra bars do, it is about light ratios, so you can give a studio shot some shape and modeling of the light and shadows within excepted tolerances.

My Website


Return to posts index


Bill Davis
Re: light meter suggestions
on Nov 12, 2010 at 11:37:33 pm

Look, with a LIVE PREVIEW system (which the 5d most assuredly has) you can SEE the ratios you're getting in REAL TIME. IN context to EVERY OTHER LIGHT AND FILL - side to side - corner to corner - full frame. PLUS the monitor gives you color temp info and lots of other data that a METER never will.

All it requires is that you TRAIN yourself to look for them on the monitor and stop using the crutch of a light meter that was designed for a totally different task.

Light meters were invented because people DIDN"T have any better way to judge exposure. and they give you NO info about color temp or light interaction. A properly calibrated monitor will do ALL of that and more.

If you want to constrain yourself to a light meter - have fun. And if you want to do location scouting without your camera - it's a GREAT tool.

All I'm saying is that any truly EXPERIENCED video DP can likely light CIRCLES round most folks armed with the fanciest meters on the market with nothing more than their eyes. Precisely because ALL the info you need is right there in front of you if you learn how to look for it.

My 2 cents worth anyway.



Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]