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Recommended shutter speed range

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Casey Petersen
Recommended shutter speed range
on Jul 9, 2010 at 5:41:29 pm

I have the 7D, and am wondering what the best shutter speeds to use are. I know the range is 30fps and faster, but I would like to know how high is too high.

Just like I would prefer that the ISO not go above 1600 when shooting video, I would like to know what kind of range other people would recommend.

Also, when shooting outdoors, if there is a circumstance where I would like to maximize bokeh on a medium/wide shot...and it's a bright sunny day, I can't keep the iris at 2.8, nor do I want to go all the way down to 16...and I don't want to speed the shutter up too much, what would you guys recommend...a ND filter?

Thanks!
Casey


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Steve Crow
Re: Recommended shutter speed range
on Jul 9, 2010 at 8:17:56 pm

Normally you set your shutter speed to 2x the frame rate, so you would use a shutter speed of "50" when filming 24p video.

From what I understand as you go lower/slower from 50 (in the case of 24p video!) your video would tend to be softer while raising it above 50 and eventually you end up with a very staccato/jumpy look

This was addressed briefly in an earlier thread


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Dave LaRonde
Re: Recommended shutter speed range
on Jul 9, 2010 at 8:28:08 pm

[Steve Crow] "..as you go lower/slower from 50 (in the case of 24p video!) your video would tend to be softer.."

...not to mention the adverse effects caused by the infamous rolling shutter: you could pan a building quickly, and on playback see that normally-vertical walls now appear curved.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


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Richard Cooper
Re: Recommended shutter speed range
on Jul 10, 2010 at 12:11:56 am

Hi Casey,
In the event that you want to open up your f/stop (smaller number) to achieve a more shallow depth of field, and you want to keep your shutter speed reasonable (so you dont get the "Private Ryan" look to your footage) you will need to use an ND filter, and unless you have a matte box to stack ND filters (depending on your light level) you can get a variable ND filter that you can attach directly to the front of your lens ( http://www.singh-ray.com/varind.html ) this will allow you to control the amount of light coming into the lens so you can keep your f/stop where you want it.

Hope this helps

Richard Cooper
FrostLine Productions, LLC
Anchorage, Alaska
http://www.frostlineproductions.com


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Norman Pogson
Re: Recommended shutter speed range
on Jul 10, 2010 at 12:52:25 am

Just be aware that frames per second,(Used to be how fast the film went through the shutter opening), is different to shutter speed. Frames per second for North American productions like TV is normally 30 fps,(25fps in Europe and Australia), so your shutter speed for "normal" filming is twice the frame rate, which is 1/60th, these are now locked in, the only variable is aperture and iso. As Richard said the way to get the shallow depth of field is to put on a neutral density filter, to block the amount of light and or a polarizing filter.

Cokin filters are a cheap option for ND filters and can be stacked with two ND filters and a polarizing filter. Ebay also have the Fader brand of variable ND filters in a screw in mount. Also don't forget to get shallow depth of field you can also use a telephoto lens, which naturally has less depth of field to a wide angle lens.

You can change the shutter speed for effect, if you want a planes propeller to not be blurred, more like a strobe effect, crank the shutter speed up, I have used 1/1000 and 1/2000 to give an unusual effect.

Movies are shot at 24 frames per second, which introduces a slight blur to the action, which gives film a distinctive feel.

My Canon 7D Blog


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