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Advice for deciding on a camera?

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Kylie Murphy
Advice for deciding on a camera?
on Apr 10, 2015 at 7:17:26 pm

Hello,

I'm looking to buy a new camera. I have had a canon t3i for several years but hardly use it, especially since I've been getting into filmmaking as the quality is not ideal. I've been saving up some money and this will be sort of the first camera I'm invested in and want to buy.

I'm just figuring out which camera to buy. I feel pretty comfortable with using the DSLR camera for video. I have really only worked otherwise with DSLRS, particularly the canon t3i. I have been researching a few cameras. Names that I've researched are the Canon t5i, 7d, and 6d. I'm not sure how these compare or which is the best I should spend my money on right now.

I really don't have a lot to spend, I'm probably not going to spend over $700 on the body. I know some of these bodies are more expensive, but I've found some deals on ebay. Another thing, I also don't really have any significant lenses. So I'm not sure the best way to spend my money.

Any suggestions/advice? Thank you very much.


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Andrej sarevski
Re: Advice for deciding on a camera?
on Apr 10, 2015 at 9:09:16 pm

When i was buying my new DLSR i have the same problem.... what to buy?
But if you listen my opinion there are plenty of DLSR that you can chose, but here is list of one of the best for me.

1. Canon EOS 7D Mark II
2. Canon EOS 5D Mark III
3. Nikon D7000

All depend how mush you like to spend ! :)


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Blaise Douros
Re: Advice for deciding on a camera?
on Apr 10, 2015 at 11:56:18 pm

Use the t3i. It really is no less capable than any of the other DSLRs you have mentioned here (in fact, it's way better than the 7D mk I). The 6D is a bit better, but all things considered, the t5i is pretty much the same camera, and is not better enough to warrant the money you'll spend on an upgrade. I own the t3i and 6D, and am happy to shoot with both--I can mix footage fro them with no problem.

If you have that kind of money to spend, consider some good lenses, tripods, an audio recorder, and a good shotgun mike. Maybe a camera slider. Don't waste it chasing new camera bodies--lenses and camera support gear will last you for many, many years.


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Kylie Murphy
Re: Advice for deciding on a camera?
on Apr 11, 2015 at 2:38:54 am

Thanks for the response! I'm afraid I wasn't very clear, my bad-- I don't own a t3i. I own a t3, but have never used it for video. I've used the t3i by renting it through my school's film department. So I'm trying to decide if I should seek out a t3i of my own or maybe invest in a "higher" level camera. I get what you're saying about bodies constantly changing, and I really need some lenses/ audio equipment of my own too.


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Mike Smith
Re: Advice for deciding on a camera?
on Apr 12, 2015 at 4:52:34 pm
Last Edited By Mike Smith on Apr 12, 2015 at 5:29:44 pm

It might be well worth your while to take a close look at the GH2 / GH3 / GH4 family ... the gh4 is pricier but the other two should be well within range of your budget, and apart from the 4K offer much of interest.


http://philipbloom.net/2012/01/06/christmas-shootout/

http://www.eoshd.com/2013/10/depth-test-5d-mark-iii-7d-raw-vs-blackmagic-po...



http://www.43rumors.com/sundance-film-upstream-color-shot-on-gh2/







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Mike Smith
Re: Advice for deciding on a camera?
on Apr 12, 2015 at 9:48:14 pm

And one more camera test link






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Blaise Douros
Re: Advice for deciding on a camera?
on Apr 13, 2015 at 3:16:56 pm

I would still say stick with the camera you've got for learning purposes. The t3 will only do 29.97 fps, and not 23.98, but that's the only sticking point, to my mind. I still think investing in some lenses and/or support gear will be better investments in the long run, especially if you want to stick to Canon and eventually go to something like the C100.

Mike, I agree with you that the GH cameras are more capable, especially than the t3, but if Kylie only has $700 to spend, investing in a GH2 and kit lens is going to burn that whole budget, leaving her nothing for other lenses, support gear, and audio.

So if I were you, I would look at gear that might be transferable to another kit--like a shoulder mount rig with follow focus, or a good tripod, or a solid audio kit. Once you have made some money with that gear, then you can apply it to your next camera. I can't say the same for a new camera--if you don't already own support gear, then you're right where you started, with a newer camera.

Best of luck--it is REALLY hard to resist the temptation to buy all the things! But if you can make good money with the gear you've got, your wallet will thank you later...when you can buy what you want!


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Bill Bruner
Re: Advice for deciding on a camera?
on Apr 20, 2015 at 3:47:42 am

Hi Kylie,

If video is your priority, you might want to avoid Canon DSLRs.

I started out with a T2i, but sold it quickly when I realized how limited it was for video.

Canon DSLRs don't have 1080/60p for smooth slow motion (below the $1800 7D Mark II) - they are limited to 30 maximum minutes of continuous recording (12 minutes for the T2i/T3i/7D/60D/5D Mark II) before they have to be restarted, they lack focus peaking and manual audio control unless you hack them with Magic Lantern and they all lose their viewfinders when you switch to "Live View" (video) mode.

Plus, Canon cameras in this price range suffer from a phenomenon known as "moire" as the result of poor downscaling. Panasonic GH cameras have a better downscaling algorithm. Here are a couple of side-by-sides between the Canon 60D and a moire-resistant Panasonic GH camera:





Newer Canon cameras are not much better. Here is a side-by-side between the Canon 60D and 70D:



Instead of a Canon DSLR, you might want to consider a moire-resistant camera such as the Panasonic G6 ($389 body only or $520 with the 14-42 kit lens) that has
1080/60p recording for in-camera slow motion; a built-in intervalometer for time-lapse; focus peaking for razor sharp manual focus; fast, silent autofocus when you need it; compatibility with affordable Panasonic zoom lenses; the ability to record video continuously for hours instead of minutes (useful for plays, speeches and events) - plus an electronic viewfinder you can actually use for shooting video outdoors in bright sunlight (when a DSLR's LCD is likely to be washed out).

After I sold my T2i, I switched to Panasonic still/video cameras. I have all four of the GH series, as pictured here.

Here is the image quality you can expect from the G6:

Narrative





Music Video





Documentary









1080/60p Slow Motion/Sport



Wedding





Travel Video



(shot with a power zoom lens)

Compared to the $2500 Canon 5D Mark III



In my experience, Panasonic G and GH cameras are the best value-for-money video/still hybrid cameras you can buy.

Hope this is helpful and good luck!

Bill
Hybrid Camera Revolution


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