FORUMS: list search recent posts

Panasonic GH4 - Mushy / Jello

COW Forums : DSLR Video

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Cody Altizer
Panasonic GH4 - Mushy / Jello
on Aug 1, 2014 at 2:52:29 am

Hello all,

First time poster here, and am inquiring about an issue I'm having with my Panasonic GH4. I just got this camera yesterday and love everything about it so far. The clarity, sharpness, 4K image quality, slow-mo, etc. It's a fantastic camera.

Unfortunately, however, I'm getting some mushy / jello footage every now and then when filming at long distances. I attached a private Vimeo video with examples.

I don't know if it's a lens issue, card issue, or what? It's frustrating, because it's not noticeable until I watch the footage on my computer. The shot with the doe and two fawns I was particularly excited about, but obviously it's not usable. I'm shooting with a Panasonic Lumix G 14-140 lens and the mushy shots are all at full zoom.

What's confusing and frustrating is it doesn't do it every shot. Note the first two clips are mushy, yet the third clip of the buck in the field is not. The image is shaky, but that's because I was hand holding it. Strangely, the first two shots were on a tripod.

https://vimeo.com/102292597

password: jello4k

I appreciate everyone's help and response


Return to posts index

Jason Jenkins
Re: Panasonic GH4 - Mushy / Jello
on Aug 1, 2014 at 4:47:29 am

Have you tried turning the OIS off when on the tripod?

Jason Jenkins
Flowmotion Media
Video production... with style!

Check out my Mormon.org profile.


Return to posts index

Cody Altizer
Re: Panasonic GH4 - Mushy / Jello
on Aug 1, 2014 at 4:53:11 am

Jason, thanks for the reply!

I have not, do you think that would help? Thing is, the OIS is so helpful that I hate to to turn it off for a problem that may or may not occur, and even worse, I don't know when or where.


Return to posts index


Steve Crow
Re: Panasonic GH4 - Mushy / Jello
on Aug 1, 2014 at 2:36:48 pm
Last Edited By Steve Crow on Aug 1, 2014 at 2:51:39 pm

Yes, I've always read that filming from a tripod with OIS on is a bad idea, it's interesting to note that your handheld shots were ok while those on the tripod weren't. Anyways, worth checking out.

Steve Crow

PS: Just found a video that demonstrates this very well:







oh and here's a quote which explains the issue very well:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/photography/tips-and-solution/image-sta...

If you mount the camera on a tripod (or similar stable platform) without cutting the IS, you risk creating what’s called a feedback loop, in which the camera’s IS system essentially detects its own vibrations, which are picked up and amplified by the tripod, which in turn forces the camera’s IS system to work increasingly harder to quell the elevating levels of camera shake. Worst case scenario: things spin out of control and your camera ends up in the repair shop.

Many newer IS systems can detect when the camera is secured to a tripod, or have a “Tripod” mode that automatically compensates for the added resistance of the tripod, or shuts the IS function off entirely. If you already own an IS-enabled lens or camera or plan on purchasing one, make sure you read the fine print in the product manual to verify the type of IS system with which the camera or lens is equipped.

An additional downside of many simpler dual-axis IS systems is that they hamper smooth side-to-side panning action. By design, dual-axis IS systems interpret and react to pan movements as shake movements, which results in jerky, uneven sideways pan motions when shooting stills and video. To remedy this issue, lens manufacturers have updated many of the newer IS-enabled optics with a Pan Mode, which allows for smoother, jerk-free panning motions.

Note: Camera and lens manufacturers use differing nomenclature to describe similar forms of functionality. Make sure you read the fine print when researching the features of camera/lens IS systems.

If you shoot with a camera that features in-camera IS (i.e. Sony Alpha/Minolta, Pentax, Olympus) and plan on using a third-party lens that also features an IS system, turn off the camera’s IS system and rely on the lens’s IS system to smooth out the bumps in the road. Running both systems simultaneously will most certainly compromise your ability to hold things steady, not to mention cause damage to one or both of the IS systems.


Return to posts index

Cody Altizer
Re: Panasonic GH4 - Mushy / Jello
on Aug 1, 2014 at 3:04:29 pm

Interesting! Thanks for the feedback! It certainly is worth checking out. Thanks for the links and videos as well.

Some of my shots at full zoom on a tripod were rock solid, so I guess it's just a random issue that could be avoided by turning IS on all locked off shots?

Another interesting note. There was a clip I didn't include in the Vimeo link where I had the same jello effect (not nearly as bad though) with a handheld shot at full zoom, but I was looking through the EVF. The EVF on the GH4 is a real blessing as it provides another point of contact and stabilization when a tripod isn't available. The image itself had almost no shake, though it was a little jello-y. I guess a testament to the IS of the lens and the usefulness of the EVF!


Return to posts index

David Rehm
Re: Panasonic GH4 - Mushy / Jello
on Aug 4, 2014 at 10:43:17 pm

Yes, that's your problem - turn the OIS OFF when on a tripod. The reason is when this is turned on the lens is expecting movement to occur.

LD


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]