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clean white backdrop

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Jonnie Lewis
clean white backdrop
on Sep 2, 2013 at 4:21:47 pm

Hello all,

I'm going to be shooting some simple clothing videos in a photography studio where a model simply stands on the spot and moves ever so slightly.

The studio has a large white backdrop which will be used as the background for the videos. I shot some test footage and the white backdrop looks distinctly yellowy/beige rather than a nice clean white.

Does anyone have any trips for how to make the white backdrop appear as clean as possible?

Thanks in advance.


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Jay Porter
Re: clean white backdrop
on Sep 2, 2013 at 5:45:56 pm

I do lots of shoots on white and the best way to keep it white (for video) is to blow it out a little bit. Also if it comes in a little off color. It's pretty easy to fix in post, as long as everything else is correct. Have your subject at about 60-70% and the background at 110. Just like a green screen you must make sure that it's lit evenly.


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Jay Porter
Re: clean white backdrop
on Sep 2, 2013 at 5:50:18 pm

I do lots of shoots on white and the best way to keep it white (for video) is to blow it out a little bit. Also if it comes in a little off color. It's pretty easy to fix in post, as long as everything else is correct. Have your subject at about 60-70% and the background at 110.







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Jay Porter
Re: clean white backdrop
on Sep 2, 2013 at 6:09:00 pm

Oh and make sure you WB to the back ground and when you do it. Make sure that your camera is seeing it at about 70%.


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Rob Manning
Re: clean white backdrop
on Sep 2, 2013 at 5:55:01 pm

Hi,

The rules for photography are in play, lighting (Kelvin) temperature color meter (app?), incidence light meter (app?) and calibrate the settings with a grey scale card, or focus and meter the camera with a a white card, or the white background itself.

In any case, these test drives will not eat up that much time in the interest of getting it right.

Camera setting should be flat or neutral unless the 'standard' or 'portrait' settings achieve the correct readings.

Another aspect, although not normative industry wide is consider (ask?) if the footage is being placed in a web magazine, there are shoots (We went to an APA clinic on the technique) where shooting the subject vertically is expected. (turn the camera length wise like shooting a full length portrait) although initially, playback will be sideways. (rotate in post)

This allows the length of the framing to be used with less crop (isolation) from typical horizontal footage if the content is destined for a web magazine like GQ or other fashion destinations.

It might be TMI but could provide another 'angle' for content after the shoot, with an interest motion shot over a matte of some type. You could do a few takes at the end for creative purposes.

It is more of a close up look and when scaled to fit onto the 16 X 9 frame, is (arguably) going to have better detail because it is a tighter shot say as a full length image.

Other folks may have better ideas on the situation.

Have fun,

Rob Manning


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Kevin Duffey
Re: clean white backdrop
on Sep 2, 2013 at 8:57:20 pm

I usually set a flat setting for recording video, then use a white balance card within the vicinity of the model/product and WB the camera. Then do some test shots and see how it comes out. It may also help if you have a larger 7" or so monitor to view the test shots to make sure the LCD isn't an issue, although usually that's not a problem.


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Rob Manning
Re: clean white backdrop
on Sep 3, 2013 at 8:00:37 pm

Leaned about test shots the hard way on a concert.

We should have done as you noted, and pushed the production team (music) and house to run a few set ups under stage lights (house lights were on) then walk backstage to the Premiere LT, and check scopes for each camera. We ended up with disparate takes (2 Nikons, 2 different Canons) so matching the footage in post was a challenge.

Using a pre shoot WB is important, again, basic photography/cinematography 101.

Thanks!

RM


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