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Hyper-real, "jagged" sport videography

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Sean Kirkland
Hyper-real, "jagged" sport videography
on Mar 1, 2013 at 5:10:26 am

Hi:

I'm wondering how some footage I've seen is achieved. It's usually sports, like maybe a tennis match or a football game, and the footage is super-intense. The look is almost jagged, yet it's "hyper-real," if that makes sense. I think I've seen this on a Gatorade commercial.

Are they shooting at 60+ FPS? Or are a few frames taken out to make it jagged-like? It's not super smooth.

Apologies for any confusion in my attempts to describe such footage! Ha.


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David Eaks
Re: Hyper-real, "jagged" sport videography
on Mar 1, 2013 at 8:01:18 am

A search for "the saving private Ryan effect" will probably give you the info you're looking for.


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Steve Crow
Re: Hyper-real, "jagged" sport videography
on Mar 1, 2013 at 3:36:35 pm

Probably a high frame rate, hand held shot, increased sharpness (as opposed to the normal suggestion of turning the sharpness off or way way way down) and then maybe adding a jitter effect which may not be obvious if the subject is moving a lot anyway. Just my thoughts

Steve Crow
Crow Digital Media
http://www.CrowDigitalMedia.com


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Jordan Westhoff
Re: Hyper-real, "jagged" sport videography
on Apr 9, 2013 at 3:20:38 pm

Most likely they are shooting a high frame rate with an abnormally high shutter speed. This removes any hint of motion blur which is quite startling to the human visual system, which interpets the lack of blur as "jaggy" or stuttery. If you saturate colors and sharpen, the effect will be amplified.

If you de-saturate and add film grain, voila! you have yourself a stereotypical war/combat movie film effect, as soon in Black Hawk Down, The Hurt Locker or Saving Private Ryan.

-Jordan Westhoff

Rochester Institute of Technology
BS Digital Cinema/Motion Picture Science 2015



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Steve Crow
Re: Hyper-real, "jagged" sport videography
on Jan 8, 2014 at 2:23:34 am

Ahhh Jordan, thanks I just reread what I posted earlier and what I meant was actually shutter speed not so much frame rate...it's easy to get those confused when my fingers are typing faster than my mind is thinkin' !

Shooting higher frame rates is something I usually equate to creating slow motion when bringing 60p content into a 24p timeline but movies like Peter Jackson's "The Hobbit" use it to achieve a hyper real look that is often criticized as being less cinematic and looking more like "video" - almost "too real"

The Digital Projector company Christie had a great explanation on their web site on the visual impact of high frame rate: "High frame rate (HFR) movies record and play visuals at twice the rate or higher of what’s seen in today’s cinemas. As a result, viewers see less flicker, motion blur and stuttered movement. The improvements to 3D movies are dramatic - creating ultra-realistic moviegoing experiences."

On second thought, high SHUTTER speeds in video are also associated with a more "staccato" (less motion blur or "smoothness" to the image flow - so maybe in some ways the visual look of high shutter speeds and high frame rates is somewhat similar after all.

Steve Crow
Crow Digital Media
http://www.CrowDigitalMedia.com


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Steve Crow
Re: Hyper-real, "jagged" sport videography
on Jan 8, 2014 at 2:40:21 am

This is actually an excellent video showing the difference between shutter speed and frame rate and the visual impact of each

https://vimeo.com/videoschool/lesson/56/frame-rate-vs-shutter-speed-setting...

Steve Crow
Crow Digital Media
http://www.CrowDigitalMedia.com


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Dan Callahan
Re: Hyper-real, "jagged" sport videography
on Jan 8, 2014 at 12:41:27 am

It's primarily dependent on the degree shutter used while filming. A quick look up gave me a 45* shutter as being what was used for saving private ryan (degree shutter is at term appropriately applied to motion picture cameras; shutter speed is the appropriate term for dslr). You can approximately equate a lower shutter angle to shooting at a higher shutter speed on a dslr. Think of the difference you see shooting at 1/50th @ 24p on a dslr versus shooting at 1/500th or 1/1000th for the same frame rate.

For these commercials, there is also a great deal of sharpening in post that takes place to emphasize this effect


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