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Bryce Moose
New to Resolve and have a question
on May 18, 2016 at 5:48:31 pm

Hello, I can't believe I never heard of this application until now. LOL

I did a test with some clips I have and I have to say this application is amazing. I was curious about one thing.


Should I export my entire film once editing and effects are done and import it into resolve to color grade or should I color grade before I add effects?

I'm also wondering about the loss in quality when exporting for resolve. Is there an export setting that is lossless so that when I go from premiere to resolve the quality doesn't get degraded?

Bryce


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Marc Wielage
Re: New to Resolve and have a question
on May 19, 2016 at 3:05:04 am

Determining a VFX workflow is a pretty major decision. A lot depends on your available budget and the actual number of shots involved. I could see different approaches being used if you had $100 and 10 shots, vs. a $5 million budget and 500 shots.

Another key issue is the type of source material. You could very well aim for a different workflow when dealing with (say) Red R3D files or BMD CinemaDNG files. You can go with a simple workflow if the entire show uses -- as one example -- ProRes, and you exported color-corrected shots for the VFX artist and all they did was do their composites without changing the color of the material at all, then you just dropped the shot back into the show, replacing the original shot. There are also workflows using exported LUTs, where the VFX artist would apply the LUT to preview the look in your final show.


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Bryce Moose
Re: New to Resolve and have a question
on May 19, 2016 at 3:46:36 am

I understand all of that but what do I export to so it doesn't lose quality after I have edited the film?

Bryce


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Marc Wielage
Re: New to Resolve and have a question
on May 19, 2016 at 8:59:05 am

It depends on all the answers to the questions I asked above: type of source material, how you need to deliver it, what the budget is, and so on.

Questions about VFX workflow generally can't get just a simple one-sentence answer, because there's too many variables. Whole books have been written on the subject.


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Joseph Owens
Re: New to Resolve and have a question
on May 19, 2016 at 2:48:48 pm

This doesn't sound like a $500M blockbuster inquiry. Otherwise there would be a post-super on this and it wouldn't appear here.

There is a rough factor-of-ten involved in formats now, but of course the fine details of source resolution and frame rate wobble the numbers around a bit. Lets talk about 23.98 1080HD.

Depending on source format, we could be talking about 1 GB/minute of media, 10GB or 100MB. One is "Uncompressed" RGB (the big one), in the middle is an intra-based format (notably ProRes, DnXHD...) and the smallest container is a Long-GOP compression. Zero tolerance workflow dictates the full pixel-for-pixel advantages of the uncompressed container -- widely expressed as a sequential .dpx approach. Its obviously a high-bandwidth demand on system resources. The Quicktime/MXF approach with a "visually lossless" codec like ProRes is right in the sweet spot for most broadcast and middle-ground productions. The Long-GOP (H264, etc.) class is a non-starter for multiple-generational post production work.

Whether you grade prior to FX work or try to integrate compositing or other paint/conceal, repair, or enhancement entirely depends on exactly what it is you are trying to do. There is no set answer to yes, definitely grade this before it goes to FX, or no, wait until we get it back -- possibly because the one FX shot in a scene might need a treatment matching it into the sequence that is inconsistent with the needs of the FX artist. Say its a muzzle flash from a firearm... does the rest of the scene need a little bright-up to absorb the moment of illumination? Is there something in the grade that will hoop the FX wrt pulling a clean matte?

We go around this loop every time with every shot at every level. If its plate work, do you grade the fg/bg to match and then send it to FX? Or do you pull the composite and then send the finished shot back to grade with an alpha qualifier so we can match between the layers? Can your fX supplier work with ProRes -- like maybe they can't if their in a Windows environment? Does their infrastructure work better with dpx sequences, or QT/MXF? If you're* it*, then its really up to you to sort out - the choices that have to be made are between flexibility and logistics with the solution appearing when everybody can do what they want without being limited by someone else's decisions.

Interestingly enough, this morning Boris released their BCC Continuum with integrated Mocha. Something I have been pestering everybody about for the last 6 years. Yes, we now have the Mocha planar tracker accessible from within Resolve. If we can pass that matte through the FX node, hoo-hah... Doris, get me heaven on the line, I'm coming home.

jPo

"I always pass on free advice -- its never of any use to me" Oscar Wilde.


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Bryce Moose
Re: New to Resolve and have a question
on May 19, 2016 at 8:46:36 pm

okay,

I guess I didn't understand it was this complicated. Here are the answers to the questions.

I am a freelance filmmaker. I make documentary film about history. Films last for about 30 to 60 min.

I edit all my media in Premiere at ProRes 422. My last film exported from premiere (which I didn't use resolve for) was a total of 7GB.

I do all the FX work myself as I am a one man show.

My budget is about 1,000 dollars per project and I do about 3 or so films per year with small editing and FX work on the side.

Bryce


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Bryce Moose
Re: New to Resolve and have a question
on May 19, 2016 at 8:48:43 pm

oh, forgot to mention the films I make are delivered to public access TV and DVD. so I have one Master File which is 7GB exported that match the sequence settings and then I give the TV station that to compress to whatever they need to for TV and then I make a MPG2 DVD file for DVD's

Bryce


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Marc Wielage
Re: New to Resolve and have a question
on May 20, 2016 at 7:51:37 am

[Bryce Moose] "I edit all my media in Premiere at ProRes 422. My last film exported from premiere (which I didn't use resolve for) was a total of 7GB. I do all the FX work myself as I am a one man show. "
Well, ProRes 422 is not terrible, but it's not ideal for VFX work because it's not 10-bit. However, if you're getting acceptable keys with your software, then keep doing what you're doing.

If you wanted to keep it very simple, you could export a "reasonable" correction in Resolve with the background/foreground plates, do your composite, then bring the finished shot back into Resolve and tweak slightly (if necessary) for the final. Lots and lots of TV series are done this way all the time.


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Bryce Moose
Re: New to Resolve and have a question
on May 21, 2016 at 5:19:14 am

I found out I can Export a XML file from Premiere and import that XML file into Resolve for color correction and export out of Resolve and import back into Premiere. Is that a good method? Is Pro Res lossless?

Bryce


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Marc Wielage
Re: New to Resolve and have a question
on May 21, 2016 at 7:11:40 am

ProRes is not lossless, but some of the codecs are good enough you won't see anything happening (say) 4-5 generations down. ProRes 444 is very good.


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Bryce Moose
Re: New to Resolve and have a question
on May 21, 2016 at 11:35:35 pm

Should I export my prores 422 footage to 444 for Resolve?

Bryce


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Marc Wielage
Re: New to Resolve and have a question
on May 22, 2016 at 12:10:41 am

It won't improve the 422 footage at all, but it wouldn't hurt it, either. It's kind of like putting 5 gallons of water in a 10-gallon bucket: the water itself won't change. As long as it's 10-bit and you have the range to make the changes you need to make, it can work. 422HQ does have less compression.


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