FORUMS: list search recent posts

Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial

COW Forums : DaVinci Resolve

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
stig olsen
Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial
on Jan 28, 2013 at 2:47:47 pm

As this has been talked about, check out this tutorial by Mynah Media. - http://www.mynahmedia.com/2013/01/3-strip-technicolor-look-in-davinci-resol...


Return to posts index

Robert Due
Re: Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial
on Jan 28, 2013 at 4:40:49 pm

Great tutorial. Great explanation as well.
Thanks!

Robert Due
Editor / Colorist
INDEPENDENT EDIT
DaVinci 9.0.3
OSX 10.7.5
MacPro 8-core 4,1 2.93 Ghz
8GB RAM
Nvidia GT120/GTX570 (CUDA 5.0.36)
Decklink Extreme3D+
Panny BT-LH1710P/ Panny BT-LH2600W
Tangent Wave


Return to posts index

Sascha Haber
Re: Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial
on Jan 28, 2013 at 5:42:50 pm

I Wonder what Mike has to say on this one...
I have the feeling there is more to it than just the pure math.
Because it doesn't look much like it :)

A slice of color...

Resolve 9.0.5 OSX 10.8.2

Colorist / Aerial footage producer
http://vimeo.com/saschahaber


Return to posts index


Mike Most
Re: Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial
on Jan 28, 2013 at 8:25:53 pm

It's an interesting approach, but ultimately not really accurate because the Parallel node simply does a mix of its inputs rather than populate the red, green, and blue channels specifically and individually. A few years ago I wrote a Shake script called Technilook (you can probably still find it somewhere on the Net, I think I originally posted it on Highend2D) that used some specific math to create "pure" red, green, and blue records and combine them in a channel specific mixing node. As with this example, the red saturation tends to get a bit out of control using this approach, so I put in a user control to adjust that. Most of what I did was based on some things that Rob Legato and Josh Pines did in prepping the movie "The Aviator" for Marty Scorsese, but I never really had access to their code (although I recall asking Josh about it a few years later....).

Just looked - yeah, it's still there on creativecrash.com...


Return to posts index

Eddie Torre
Re: Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial
on Jan 29, 2013 at 1:53:16 am

Mike,

That was a FANTASTIC tutorial, very detailed. I ran across that on Highend2D back in the day. Still one of my favourites of all time. If they gave Oscars for tutorials, you would have won an award for that.

I went looking for that tutorial not too long ago, but wasn't able to find it, thanks for the link.
I still have it on my system I think "Technilook-v0"


Return to posts index

Joseph Owens
Re: Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial
on Jan 29, 2013 at 8:39:11 pm

[Sascha Haber] "I have the feeling there is more to it than just the pure math.
Because it doesn't look much like it :)"


Same gut response here... and/but also completely fascinating.

I can't convince myself that there is a linear correspondence between the decoded RGB values of a digitally-gathered file, possibly (or probably) matrixed as it is for 709 space, and mechanically filtered light recorded on black&white stock, which will have its own spectral response. What are the center-wavelengths of the printed gelatin (complementary) three-strips and printing densities?

Too bad we don't really have the same Y'CbCr extraction and conversion tools as SHAKE, where the split and recombine nodes are a click away. and....

Its one of the few things I miss about AppleCOLOR/Final Touch.

jPo

"I always pass on free advice -- its never of any use to me" Oscar Wilde.


Return to posts index


Juan Salvo
Re: Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial
on Jan 29, 2013 at 9:20:09 pm

"I have the feeling there is more to it than just the pure math."
It seems the math is a bit off. I've done a version which I think should be more mathematically accurate.



I think it comes quite a bit closer, still a work in progress. But it's based on the same formula used for the 3-strip look in the aviator.

Here is screengrab of my node tree:


More about it here: http://liftgammagain.com/forum/index.php?threads/technicolor-3way-the-corre...

Colorist | Online Editor | Post Super | VFX Artist | BD Author

http://JuanSalvo.com


Return to posts index

John Burkhart
Re: Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial
on Jan 29, 2013 at 12:40:04 am

Thanks for the interest guys, I created this tutorial, and any suggestions or constructive criticisms to improve it are welcome.

Mostly it was an attempt to replicate an analog process digitally, using the same theories. Mike brings up an interesting point about the parallel node not allowing you to send data to certain channels only. But it was the closest thing I could find in resolve to physically smashing bits together.

I'm thinking of adding a bit at the end about adding to the look by crushing the blacks a little bit, adding a little cyan to the shadows, increasing the contrast, but leaving the highlights nice and wide and maybe adding a little halation to them. But these are all subjective choices and will change with the footage. The tutorial is more designed to get you to about 80% or so of the final look, and you take yourself the rest of the way.

Thanks!

John Burkhart

http://mynahmedia.com


Return to posts index

stig olsen
Re: Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial
on Jan 29, 2013 at 6:49:43 pm

Mike,

Is it possible to come closer or to create this look without the use of parallel nodes? In Davinci.

Stig


Return to posts index


John Burkhart
Re: Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial
on Jan 30, 2013 at 6:21:37 am

I'm trying out some new ideas using a layer node in the subtractive mode, trying to just get an image to a single RGB channel of another node, but it's exploding and getting messy quickly :)

John Burkhart

http://mynahmedia.com


Return to posts index

Eric Johnson
Re: Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial
on Jan 29, 2013 at 8:01:46 pm

This is pretty cool!

But I was wondering, based on the illustration on this page: http://www.digital-intermediate.co.uk/examples/3strip/technicolor.htm

Would the values actually be 1/3, 1/3, 1/3? Or would more than a 1/3 make it to the Green strip and the remainder be split across the Red and Blue, with a slight offset towards the Blue since the light hits it before the Red?

Rational is based on what I've heard from people on 3D shows, the beam splitter tends to create a slightly darker frame for one eye, and sometimes the prism also introduces a slight color shift... not sure if thats true for all 3D systems, but seems to be for some... So would that not hold true for a prism 75-80 yrs ago?

And if the Parallel node isn't the right way to bring it all together... what about a Layer node with a Composite mode?

Just thoughts that came to mind while reading the tutorial and responses to it. Really cool process, gonna give it a whirl next chance I get.


Return to posts index

Joseph Owens
Re: Technicolor 3 strip - tutorial
on Jan 30, 2013 at 9:30:18 pm

[John Burkhart] "any suggestions"

Maybe one way to work around the additive R+G+B overexposure, and perhaps start coming back to the original process would be to think about it as a negative effect which is sort of where you're going with the CYMg filters-- flip the image black-for-white and primary hues for complementary secondaries, which really is what is going on at the three-strip film origination.

That way... whites are at zero and... zero+zero+zero is still zero. Blacks would be really solid at the other end... and that might be a corollary to the subtractive process.

jPo

"I always pass on free advice -- its never of any use to me" Oscar Wilde.


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]