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margherita gramegna
editing
on Apr 6, 2010 at 11:28:44 pm

would you say that for every min of shooting is ten min of editing?


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Rich Rubasch
Re: editing
on Apr 7, 2010 at 1:10:33 am

Interesting. I would say that basic interview and broll type editing comes in at about 5 minutes of finished edits per day (8 hours). Other types of editing, like step by step procedurals might net more minutes per day.

And high concept TV spots with lots of takes for a :30 spot might take a day or more to cut the 30 seconds.

None of this includes adding in music or doing a full mix. Nor does it include color correction or effects and animation.

Helpful?

Rich Rubasch
Tilt Media Inc.
Video Production and Post
Owner/President/Editor/Designer/Animator
http://www.tiltmedia.com


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Timothy J. Allen
Re: editing
on Apr 7, 2010 at 3:23:32 am

It really varies. I've done multi-camera shoots where post was done faster than the original shoot, but I've worked on documentaries and commercials that had closer to a 15:1 ratio of post/production time. The documentaries took a long time because of all the tape that we had to sift through in post to "find the story" and the commercials took longer to edit because we used to have to wait much longer for rendering graphics and composites.

What type of show are we talking about? And do you consider compositing and graphics work as part of "editing"? I used to save tons of time by making sure the producer brought me really good time code notes in a format I could import but that hasn't happened in a long time.

When I started posting in HD back around 2003, I remember leaving things to render at night with nothing but careful planning and hopes they came out OK the next morning. Come to think of it, I also did that back in 1997 when I was running Media 100 on a Power Mac 8500.

I'd better stop now that I'm getting all nostalgic. As fun as it was, I don't really miss the "good old days" that I spent watching a cartoon watch icon spin on a CRT monitor. ;-)





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Mark Suszko
Re: editing
on Apr 7, 2010 at 2:24:48 pm

It is said that when they were editing "Apocalypse Now", they only averaged one or two cuts per day, because of all the previewing and re-viewing and testing of each cut before it was considered "right"m then each cut was constantly re-evaluated in context with the net cut following. And that was cutting and splicing and projecting film.

The fastest I've ever edited, for something VERY simple and cuts-only, was right around a 2 to 1 ratio of edit time to running time. Well, there was the time I had to cut something faster that that; broadcast deadline was in three minutes and the tuff was already on the timeline but still just rough. Thanks to the picon setup for scenes in Discreet Edit6 (God rest its soul), I just did a few selects of the picons, deleted those, the rest of the segments snapped together and I hit "play" off the timeline just as the sat window opened. I don't think that one counts.

I would say my average ratio for simple projects is more like 3 or 4 to 1 as far as time, and much hiher when doing compositing work, but like Tim says, it is like asking "How long is a ball of string?" You don't accurately know until you unwind it.


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margherita gramegna
Re: editing
on Apr 7, 2010 at 10:01:12 pm

thanks everyone for all the replies....yes , my query is a 'how long is a piece of string' type of question, I agree...but I was thinking of rough edit and a way to give out the message to young media people to not let their thumb getting too comfortable on the red button and to occasionally lift it.


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Micah McDowell
Re: editing
on Apr 7, 2010 at 8:08:15 pm

It totally depends on what the subject, intended goal, and circumstances are.

I just put together a 2 minute montage this morning, maybe took me three hours. I also cut a 2 minute promo that maybe took half an hour. The promo took around an hour for me to shoot with many takes for the talent, while the montage was mostly b-roll and stills that I didn't shoot, so I had to weed through them and find the good ones.

For me, documentary/reality TV type stuff has always taken me the longest to cut, since you're finding the story in a pile of disjointed elements. Anything that is scripted/planned ahead generally edits itself.


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margherita gramegna
Re: editing
on Apr 7, 2010 at 9:58:20 pm

thanks everyone for all the replies....yes , my query is a 'how long is a piece of string' type of question, I agree...but I was thinking of rough edit and a way to give out the message to young media people to not let their thumb getting too comfortable on the red button and to occasionally lift it.


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Mark Suszko
Re: editing
on Apr 7, 2010 at 11:29:11 pm

Blasphemy!

As the person that edits what I shoot, I much prefer to have too much rather than not enough. Many is the time I grabbed some video from the leader or the room tone recording, you never know what little bit can come in handy sometimes. Recording media (tape) is by far the cheapest thing in video... until it comes back blank or unusable. Nobody says you have to load all of it into your system, but I say shoot until you're out of ammo. You can always re-record over it later.


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grinner hester
Re: editing
on Apr 8, 2010 at 2:12:06 am

no.



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Timothy J. Allen
Re: editing
on Apr 8, 2010 at 6:38:17 pm

Leave it to Grinner to be so concise! :-)



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Rocco Forte
Re: editing
on Apr 8, 2010 at 9:26:26 pm

It's not how much you shoot that reflects the amount of time needed to edit it, necessarily, but rather how well organized it is. Two hours of un-slated mess will most likely take longer to edit that ten hours of precisely labeled footage.


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