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Editor's Resume

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Sharon Hardy
Editor's Resume
on Feb 11, 2009 at 8:44:49 pm

Hello...

I've been working in the TV pre-production world for the last ten years, but have always been interested in editing. In my spare time, I've edited a bunch of short films and music videos using FCP and AE.

I have my reel, but I assume I also need a resume?

What does an editor's resume look like? Since I've never edited for a company, should I simply list my projects like an actor would? And how much do I feature my old TV life? I want to show that I've been working in the industry for a while, but it doesn't actually pertain to what I want to do now.

Thanks so much for any help,
Sharon


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cowcowcowcowcow
Mark Suszko
Re: Editor's Resume
on Feb 13, 2009 at 9:41:05 pm

Two main resume formats are chronological and functional. Of the two, I prefer and recommend functional, meaning a resume that gathers like tasks together regardless of their chronology. It also tends to hide gaps or other quirks in employment history.

A chronological resume is a boring, linear read; you usually don't get to "the good stuff" right away. In a functional resume you might break it down into sections like:


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Logging and database management-
-3 years experience for xyz handling proper ingest and filing of footage for the lead Avid editor, became official assistant Avid editor and system maintenance technician in (year). My preparation of elements and footage let our editors work faster and deliver award-winning work, thanks to well-coordinated databases and clean, reliable storage I maintained. Spent free time studying for Avid Certified status.

Client account work- -One year working as main client office contact, coordinating edit sessions and scheduling for clients and services at AQT corp. Praised for outstanding client relationships and being able to translate client needs and requests into logical scheduling and billing documentation. Also spent this time training on Adobe AfterEffects compositing, on my own initiative. Continued my schooling at (college name), pursuing a Bachelors degree in communications.

Lead Editor, online Cause Marketing project for (big charity)-
-as a Pro-Bono effort, edited and compressed YouTube videos for (charity name) on spec to promote (charity event) online and stretch my skills in animated graphics; We learned to work in a team with other creative professionals.... (this is a slightly puffed-up way to describe, without lying, that you and some friends goofed around one weekend with borrowed equipment to try and learn something and make a useful video in the process. Remember, you have to be ready to show, document, and defend anything you claim to have done, so don't stretch the truth very far on such things. Treat them as what they are: examples of your learning and initiative).


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>


yadda, yadda, yadda, it goes on like that: you group by functions first, to tell a story of where your skills and triumphs are, without concentrating on the chronology and why you were between jobs for 11 months. Use active language, as in the above example.



Something else I suggest you do in a resume (and the mandatory customized cover letter you target for each specific position) is to be sure to drop in relevant buzzwords.

By this, I am referring to what goes on in modern HR screening of resumes and letters: a computer reads your submission before any human does. They scan it by OCR or decode it from an electronically filed e-resume, and compare your text file to a list of keywords the HR people have picked as significant. They also reject any application with typos. The more times the keywords are found in the resume and cover letter, the higher the machine scores you as a potential applicant, and if you score high enough, you move up to a real read from, and maybe interview with, a live body from the overworked HR department.

I would say that if you are responding to an ad that mentions a specific app, say, Avid, you better by gosh put the word "Avid" in your text a few times. If you just refer to "online editing experience", and not AVID you score lower with the computer than someone who name-dropped the keyword of "Avid" a few times. You lost the race before they dropped the flag.

Now of course don't get obnoxious with the number of keyword mentions, Be logical and smooth about it. But don't ignore it.

When I make a functional resume, I put little blurbs down the left margin that work like pull quotes or captions, they point across to the more detailed entries like the ones listed above. The margin caption for the first section might for example say:

"Editing Hardware
and software systems skills"


These little separate captions draw the eye right to parts of your resume most relevant to the human reader. They should be as tightly worded and edited as you can make them, and they should all try to add up to a person who is well-rounded and understands that editing is a tech job, but also a creative activity, and (often forgotten but invaluabe) one that relies on great interpersonal communication and client skills in order to be successful.

There are tons of free examples of functional resume writing on the web, go check them out and compose your own custom look.


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Sharon Hardy
Re: Editor's Resume
on Feb 13, 2009 at 10:49:29 pm

Thanks, Mark...very helpful!



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Stephen Smith
Re: Editor's Resume
on Feb 14, 2009 at 12:26:12 am

Mark, great advice as always. I gave it 5 COWS.
Something I think you should keep in mind Sharon, your reel is what will get you the job. I always look at some ones reel before I touch their resume. Any one can say they can cut on an AVID but their reel will really show if they can or can't. I would spend most of your time polishing your reel. At least that's how I see it, I work for a small company. Maybe the bigger companies see it differently. Best of luck in your new pursuit.





Stephen Smith
Salt Lake Video

Check out my DVD Money Making Graphics & Effects for Final Cut Studio 2


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Sharon Hardy
Re: Editor's Resume
on Feb 14, 2009 at 6:53:58 am

Hi Stephen, thanks so much for the great advice. I'm working now on making my reel really awesome!



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Roy Schneider
Re: Editor's Resume
on Feb 17, 2009 at 2:34:09 pm

Mark
Great advise! I like the functional resume. One question about spelling. Is there a problem if you have words not recognized by the computer (such as Emmy)?

Roy Schneider
Long Live Da Cow!


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Stephen Smith
Re: Editor's Resume
on Feb 17, 2009 at 3:15:23 pm

Speaking of Word...they have resume templates that you should look at if it's not to late. Congrats on the Emmy by the way.





Stephen Smith
Salt Lake Video

Check out my DVD Money Making Graphics & Effects for Final Cut Studio 2


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Brittany DeLillo
Re: Editor's Resume
on Dec 3, 2013 at 2:36:28 am

Does anyone have other examples of resumes? I'm currently in the process of re-working mine. I'd be willing to share it if anyone wants to give direct feedback.


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Stephen Smith
Re: Editor's Resume
on Dec 3, 2013 at 3:54:48 pm

Take a look at this article on the COW, it may be of some help: http://library.creativecow.net/biscardi_walter/Getting-Hired/1

Stephen Smith

Utah Video Productions

Check out my Motion Training DVD

Check out my Vimeo page


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grinner hester
Re: Editor's Resume
on Feb 18, 2009 at 7:20:26 pm

Short and simple. The last thing a busy employer wants to do is thumb through multiple pages of hooha. Just list your employment history, what ya did, how long you were there and some references. Your reel is the gig getter/killer. Your resume is just for human resources. Never have I hired someone based on a resume.



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Ken Harper
Re: Editor's Resume
on Feb 19, 2009 at 6:19:48 pm

Sharon,
I have been editing for 25 years and the only time I ever used a resume was right out of college. Since then it has been reputation and my reel. Editors are artists and prospective employers want to SEE your work, not read about it. Also, you need to know alittle about the type of work the company you are looking at does and taylor your reel to show similar work or sytle. Good luck!


Ken Harper
Sr. Editor/Director of Operations
Moving Pictures, Inc.


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Sharon Hardy
Re: Editor's Resume
on Feb 20, 2009 at 6:24:51 pm

Hi Grin & Ken,

Thanks so much for the advice!



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