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Editing at a distance.

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Jesus Silva
Editing at a distance.
on Jul 1, 2008 at 9:21:24 pm

Hi guys,

As an editor I have two features under my belt and this time I will embark in a project that will be shoot 700 miles away.

I will be editing from L.A and the producer/director are in Tucson.

The film will be shot in P2 24P format and we have talked so far is have the hard drives send to me via mail.

What will be the best practice/workflow for editing in this kind of scenario?

Big thanks in advance. . .

"Equations are more important to me, because politics is for the present, but an equation is something for eternity."
Albert Einstein


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Mark Suszko
Re: Editing at a distance.
on Jul 1, 2008 at 10:28:47 pm

For the love of God, don't send all the hard drives together; at the very least, have them mirror each drive and keep one as backup while sending you the other. Think of it as keeping one hand on a safety rail at all times. Look what happened to one entire episode of "Lost". Hint: it got "Lost" and had to be re-shot.

Is there no way they can send you lower-rez proxies via FTP to work from?


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grinner hester
Re: Editing at a distance.
on Jul 4, 2008 at 2:43:35 pm

I like the raw footage fed exed to me so that I can use it as I need to. File swappage slows me down.



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Michael Phillips
Re: Editing at a distance.
on Jul 8, 2008 at 1:48:13 am

I would suggest lookng into counter to counter services at the airport - fedex has lost some of my stuff over the years...

Michael

Michael Phillips


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Jesus Silva
Re: Editing at a distance.
on Jul 8, 2008 at 7:49:00 pm

The producer and I we where talking about the idea of
having a good edit assistant there (Tucson) to create a FCP project then mirror the project and the media to other driver, then ship it to L.A.

That way will be possible to email the project file with the latest edit to the producer/director to check the progress instead to have to compress sequences and send the over the web.

Has anyone try this approach before?

Thanks,

"Equations are more important to me, because politics is for the present, but an equation is something for eternity."
Albert Einstein


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Mark Suszko
Re: Editing at a distance.
on Jul 8, 2008 at 8:01:16 pm

As I understand it (which is not at all well) this is something how the new Adobe video pdf system works: all footage is first mirrored at two sites, hooked together live, with a skype voice line alongside. The software locks both sites to the same time code reference so both site displays are always looking at the same exact frame. You and the guy at the other end, say, a client or director on location, both have control of a timeline of the project that can be step-framed or shuttled at any speed or direction at will. The data overhead is low because you're not actually streaming the pictures and sound, just the timeline shuttling commands. Then each workstation moves it's timeline around to match. Supposedly you can annotate frames and draw right on them in telestrator style. Seems like a powerful collaboration tool. Or on the bad side, a way to over-micro-manage someone remotely. If you and your editor are really all that far apart in how you're looking at things, technical solutions may not help. If OTOH, you are leaving a lot up to the editor and just use this tool to see and understand his progress, again, that could speed things.


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James Cole
Re: Editing at a distance.
on Jul 21, 2008 at 4:10:54 am

I am currently using this approach on a feature.

I live in a different state to where the production and everything else is happening. The post supervisor and assistant editor is with the production and looking after logging, capturing and cloning the hard drives. They then send me the clone and like you suggested I send them a project file of updated work.

We have found it better to send just XML files of the timeline as the project files can get a bit bulky. The XML files once zipped or stuffed get down to around 100k so it's easy to email.

The assistant then re-links the media does any rendering that is needed and gets the team to watch it.

If I create any temp VFX shots, I compress the crap out of them and upload them to a secure FTP site for them to download.

It's working very well and we haven't had any problems with it yet.

James Cole

Editor - Visual Effects Supervisor

HYSTERIA Productions





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