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tv and movie trailers???

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mr_gfx
tv and movie trailers???
on May 5, 2007 at 3:30:50 am

I have come to realize that i want to end up cutting Tv shows and/or movie trailers.

Any advice on how to accomplish this goal? are there certain companies that specialize in this type of thing or is it hit or miss with any production companies?

thanks.


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Chaz Shukat
Re: tv and movie trailers???
on May 5, 2007 at 8:58:19 pm

TV shows are produced all over the country but trailers are a highly specialized field and are produced by companies that specialize in trailers. These trailer houses are in NY and LA. Most of their editors start as runners and move up through the ranks. If you have a connection and some snazzy commercials and or demo trailers, you might get a shot at doing some on a freelance basis and if your version of the trailer is selected by the client to be finished, you may get more work and eventually a staff position. The movie studios also cut trailers.

Chaz S.


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grinner
Re: tv and movie trailers???
on May 6, 2007 at 1:28:19 am

When making yur rel, always show either your specialty or what yu want your specialty to be. In other words, grafik-orientedpeeps need to hav grafik heavy rels. Stpry tellers need to hilight there sto-telling. You polly wanna cut some trailers and send those out as your reel. If you wanna do shows, hilight your longform work or create some of you havn't had the opportunity to do this yet.



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Mark Suszko
Re: tv and movie trailers???
on May 7, 2007 at 6:51:21 am

This question reminds me of an old Steve Martin bit: How to be a millionaire and never pay any taxes.

Step one: Get a million dollars.
Step two, when the tax bill comes, you don't pay it. Say "I forgot".

Nobody's going to hire you to make trailers right off the bat, with no experience or background. You have too many folks ahead of you already doing it, and who are you to any of them anyway.

Well, I know of one exception. The guy behind the trailer and titles for "Seven" came out of a print graphic arts background, I seem to recall. He was brought in specifically because he was not a run of the mill trailers or titles guy, but because he had a rep for striking, disturbing, imaginative imagery, and that's what they were looking for to give the movie a distinct visual identity. So, by him being out in left field like he was, that was the special ingredient that gave him an edge others didn't have. He was brought in by networks of contacts and friends-of-friends, all of which knew him by reputation.

The other way to proceed is to not wait for every other candidate for the job to drop dead and leave a hole for you to fill, but to go work on independant projects of your own and with others, and build a reel of editing work.

Trailer cutters, while specialized, are still first of all editors. And they don't work in a vacuum; the trailer creation proces is very tightly tied to marketing for the movie and the cutters need to answer to a plethora of bosses regarding creative and legal issues as well as advertising strategies and "formulas" or templates for these things thatare pretty copycat... to the point your own creative contribution may not be all that much... not to mention, you often have to deal with the fact the trailer is bing made before the movie is finished, and you have technical limitations as to what you can work with.

I would say the path is to work at being the best *editor* you can be, while networking with marketing types so that you can be in a position to try for a job working on trailers. But you have to realize, since the stakes for movies are so great, it is highly unlikely you'll ever get the opportunity to work on one without many years of building a rep first. Not when there are many proven guys out there already doing the work.

Unless you find that oddball side-specialty like the example I wrote about. Be "that guy" who does the one really hard and obscure but interesting thing, and hope it comes into vogue for a while. But that's also a very rare thing. Better plan maybe is to just keep working on anything and everything, build contacts, create opportunities. Make your OWN movies and make the trailers for them.

Make trailers for movies not yet made, as exampels for fund-raising efforts. In the latest Tarantino/Rodriguez movie; "Grindhouse", they made fake trailers as part of the overall ambiance of the film, and the public reaction to them was so positive, at least one of the fake trailers is going to lead to a real movie now! They say "luck" is created by hard work plus opportunity. Work hard, and get to know as many people as you can while doing that, to create the opportunity. More than other busineeses, Hollywood is full of people who make multi-million-dollar decisions based on relationships. On who they know and who they trust.



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person
Re: tv and movie trailers???
on May 7, 2007 at 2:16:09 pm

mark,
part of what made the intro to 'seven' so interesting was because of several factors/artists. and don't forget the music/sound design. it felt precise, surgical and fluid. anyone would give their left nut to work with fincher's footage. the edit was by angus wall of rock paper scissors. angus had a history of working with david fincher's music vids and spots. not sure who the type designer/animator was. generally editors of this nature will put temp graphics and temp/final audio in while the design is finalized (usually in storyboard form). so i would have to say the editor and footage made the designer look pretty dang good, and the designer made the editor and fincher look pretty dang cool. my point is a little bit of a tangent, but it's a team effort in many cases in film and one has to be able to accept their role as editor or designer or director or tape op or coffee maker...

so i say good luck to the original poster


Editor


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Chaz Shukat
Re: tv and movie trailers???
on May 7, 2007 at 7:39:36 pm

You could sell your soul to S A T A N!!!!!!!!!!!

Trailer editors do get paid very well, like commercial editors, but there is a reason. There is a price to be paid. It has become very cookie cutter and there is a lot of pressure, so many get burnt out after a while. Also, if you work at a trailer house, you won't be the only editor working on a film's trailer. The studios hire several trailer houses to take a whack at each film, then they take which ones they like and then combine them to make a Franken-trailer. So, many times you have very little authorship over the final product (unless you are editing in house for one of the studios), and of course, you get no on screen credit. So, be careful what you wish for.

Chaz S.


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John Davidson
Re: tv and movie trailers???
on May 27, 2007 at 10:08:52 pm

First I would fill out your profile and add a demo reel. Unless you're in the CIA, anonymity will hurt you in the professional realm. People either assume you're not legitimate, or choose to make crass posts, snipe at other posters, and then hide behind a blank profile.

I think what you meant on your post was that you want to make trailers for TV shows and Movies, not that you want to make TV Shows. In the television realm, promos are typically produced by the creative services and/or marketing deparments. As an editor, you want to get in touch with producers that work in these departments. Sometimes inhouse producers can't do all the work networks need done, so the networks call companies like mine to take up the slack.

So, you're two options are, find a posthouse that caters specifically to promo producers (Riot! Atlanta would be one) which will be difficult because post houses prefer editors with their own clients in tow, or find an inhouse production department that services promo producers from within a media company (Turner Studios in Atlanta services all networks within Turner Brodacasting).

In either situation, unless you're an accomplished freelancer with a stellar reel of spots, you're going to need to come in at entry level and work your way up the ranks, from tape op to avid editor.

It's better to go the post-house route, because you'll have access to better spots and more experience producers.

Just my two cents.

John Davidson____ writer | producer | director____http://www.magicfeather.tv


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John Davidson
Re: tv and movie trailers???
on May 28, 2007 at 6:05:29 am

After rereading that first paragraph I wrote, I was like "Boy, I'm a jerk". It's just annoying when you want to give somebody region/market specific advice and their profile is blank. Sorry if I was brisque - I have no reason to believe you've 'sniped' at anybody.

Probably shouldn't respond to posts when I have a migraine :-).

John Davidson____ writer | producer | director____http://www.magicfeather.tv


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predator
Re: tv and movie trailers???
on Jun 26, 2007 at 11:44:31 pm

This isn't really the truth. In some cases a studio will ask multiple shops to cut on a film, however in many cases you as the editor will cut the trailer and that will be what's finished. In some cases the individual trailer house might have multiple editors on the job so that the client gets options, but because trailers cost so much to make they often pick a trailer house and stick with them unless they really screw things up.

Just like many of the other posters have said, trailer editing isn't easy to get into, especially if you desire to work on theatrical domestic trailers (the cream of the crop in the trailer world). I would suggest that you put together the best reel you can, perhaps with some spec trailers (you can digitize your favorate film and use that to cut a version of a trailer) and get that out to everybody and anybody. most likely you will be up for an assistant position and if you do get one (these are also very hard to get in LA) then i would work your ass off and learn as much as you can from everybody around you. Trailer editing while a group activity to some degree is still all about the editor sitting in a dark room alone and cutting. Any good producer who's got work on their table doesn't have the time to babysit an editor and that's why the best are paid well because they are trusted.

Good luck.
jason



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