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How history will remember this era...

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Pixel Monkey
How history will remember this era...
on Feb 15, 2007 at 10:30:39 pm

Pulled out the trusty Bolex yesterday just to look at it. 'Made me reflect on this digital whirlpool we're caught in and its comparison to the origins of filmmaking.

A buncha years ago, they hated the lifelessness of black and white films. Theyt had a new technology to "paint" the film, so they did. We didn't care - it was new and snappy. A buncha years later, they found out that this video stuff was a lot less expensive. That was the end of your trusty NEWS anchor promising "film at eleven".

50 years from now, I think editors and directors will dust off our HDV tapes, MPEG-2 DVDs, and tapeless memory banks and scream bloody murder how the slope of quality dropped dramatically during the "HD daze". How we were so concerned with our server storage, our thumb-drives, FTP downloads, codecs, transcodes, and just general pixel monkeying, that the art of the moving image fizzled into the art of moving those images.

My 2


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mark harvey
Re: How history will remember this era...
on Feb 15, 2007 at 11:21:41 pm

Wow, well said.

I agree 100% with your statement. Quality has depreciated in many areas. I look at Satellite tv. The pixels drive me crazy. The amount of video being put on a single transponder up in space is astonishing. Back when one channel occupied one transponder (C-Band, one horizontal, one vertical), they are now putting upwards of 12 channels on that same space.

We all want HD now, but is what the consumer seeing true HD ??? It is so compressed, that artifacts become unbearable, especially around graphics.

I remember when DV video was deemed unacceptable by broadcasters. Some still won't accept it, but a lot of braodcasters will. Why wouldn't they, they know that by the time the consumer sees it, chances are that has been so heavily compressed that the difference would be negligble.

I'm not sure how we will look back at this era, but I am hoping that video quality will have improved to a point where we can look at todays video and laugh at how pitiful it looked. There again, maybe I just have the wrong provider ;-)

Mark


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Steven L. Gotz
Re: How history will remember this era...
on Feb 16, 2007 at 4:04:58 pm

[mark harvey] "I'm not sure how we will look back at this era, but I am hoping that video quality will have improved to a point where we can look at todays video and laugh at how pitiful it looked. There again, maybe I just have the wrong provider ;-)"

That's what I was thinking as I read the first post. Our current technology will be so far behind the Quantum Resolution, Holographic imaging, that puts sights, tastes, smells and sounds directly into our heads through electronic recievers embedded under our skin behind our ear.

The idea of watching old movies will be to our decendants as watching silent movies is to us. Interesting as a novelty, but not as a form of entertainment that we would use on a daily basis.

But then again, I was born in the 1950's, and I am still waiting for my flying car.


Steven
http://www.stevengotz.com


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mark harvey
Re: How history will remember this era...
on Feb 16, 2007 at 4:47:24 pm

But then again, I was born in the 1950's, and I am still waiting for my flying car.

Thanks for the laughs, I had been thinking this when I read a post further down the page about touchscreens.

Mark


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Rocco
Re: How history will remember this era...
on Feb 16, 2007 at 7:38:09 pm

This thread made me think of Youtube actuallly rather than industry specs.

Ironic that in 2007 the greatest phenominon in media distribution comes in the form of tiny, awful looking video clips. What's going to happen if advertising revenue on the net surpasses broadcasting? Why would producers spend millions adhering to strict broadcast technical specs when they can just "dump" their content online? I know it's early days, and most of this is wild speculation but good picture quality isn't necessarily the future: When it comes to mass media, the quality of the pictures is less important than accessability and content.



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Charlie King
Re: How history will remember this era...
on Feb 16, 2007 at 10:08:51 pm

I find it so refreshing that others are saying what I am saying. I remember when 3/4 came into existence. The quality was really very low compared to what we had been doing. Then 1 inch came along and quality standards went up. Beta came along and 3/4 was on the shelf of obsolence. When I first started hearing and reading about High Definition I was so excited. Now that it is happening with the influx of digital video and HD I am so disappointed. There are no quality standards anymore. Everyone wants cheap and fast. Now we are looking at video on your cellular phone tiny screens compressed so high with no resolution to speak of at all. Will things take an upward turn? I am thinking that it isn't gonna happen. Quality in broadcast and video overall is totally a thing of the past. Plus we are starting to see the moving away from talent in acting and replacing actors with CGI images. Is nothing sacred anymore? I think not.

Charlie



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Mike Cohen
Re: How history will remember this era...
on Feb 17, 2007 at 9:37:09 pm

I think as video moves to the web, over say 5-10 years the quality and bandwidth will be so good, the web will replace broacast tv all together. So at the end of this evolution, we will have web-tv as good as broadcast/cable/satellite tv is today. Then some clever broadcaster is going to find a way to start broadcasting to the tv again, and the process will reverse itself.

Or not.

Mike

PS - I have a flying car. It folds up into a briefcase when I get to the office.


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mike velte
Re: How history will remember this era...
on Feb 18, 2007 at 12:32:06 pm


When vinyl was king we spent big bucks on diamond stylus and heavy turn tables or if we had deep pockets, reel to reel decks. Along came the cassette tape and we obsessed over Dolby NR, metallic tape and signal to noise ratio. Then the CD brought audio nirvana to the masses.
Video acquisition and playback evolved similarly and quality peaked with Beta sp and analog cable.
We are now satisfied with highly compressed music (mp3) and think a pixelated digital SD picture stretched out on a HD set is cool.
Where has taste gone?


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Bob Bonniol
Re: How history will remember this era...
on Feb 25, 2007 at 8:11:57 pm

It's hard to say how history will view all of this. One thing is for sure: The end consumer decides what is acceptable quality, not all of us videophiles. As the end user delves into the use of online, downloadable files (that look terrible quality wise), as they use consumer level devices (their phones) as their principle recording device, they reveal that they don't subjectively care about the issues with the medium that drive us bananas. We can whine all we want folks, but they make the call. Look how far down the pike audio quality has gone, with nary a murmur from the market.

As technology progresses, and quality becomes simple to achieve, it will leak back in. But don't believe for a minute that consumers will drive any kind of broadcast quality standard. In fact I'd brace yourself for that quality to diminish further before it gets better. And as far as networks or producers enforcing it... Forget about it. Let's get real. What's the one thing WE all know about producers and providers ? What they REALLY care about is $$, and if they can get away with filming 'professional' gigs with phones, they will.

My .02

Cheers,
Bob Bonniol

MODE Studios
http://www.modestudios.com
Contributing Editor, Entertainment Design Magazine
Art of the Edit Forum Leader
Live & Stage Event Forum Leader
HD Forum Leader


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