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Tim Wilson
Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 11, 2012 at 5:20:55 pm

I HAAAAAATE the word spoilers. Hate it. Hate it. Hate it, so I refuse to name a thread after it.

But here you go. If you've seen Prometheus, read on. Otherwise, read or don't read as you wish. Just don't use the word spoiler. Come back when you're ready to hear what people have seen and chime in as you see fit.

FWIW, I'm seeing it tomorrow, but will read along anyway. I knew how Titanic was gonna end, and still liked the movie fine.


Yr pal,
Timmy

Tim Wilson
Associate Publisher, Editor-in-Chief
Creative COW Magazine
Twitter: timdoubleyou



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Scott Roberts
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 11, 2012 at 6:04:36 pm

Well, for starters... (and this gives away A LOT)

The reproductive methods that lead to the creation of 'the alien' as we all know it from the other films of the series MADE NO SENSE.

In fact this whole sequence of events is lazily thought through. Let's go through it, shall we:

1. David collects some of the black goo from the shrine room.

2. For, what I have determined to be a completely nonsensical reason, David put the black goo in the scientists water, then gives it to him to drink, in what is an uncharacteristically malicious act of a robot programmed to act a certain way.

3. The infected scientist goes to bone-town with his lady scientist friend, and it is assumed that the black goo infused sperm of the male can get a female human ready to give birth to an alien species within a matter of days.

4. The black goo mixed with a human female creates a squid creature. You should also be taking note that many, MANY other breeding methods of the alien species have resulted in human males giving birth (or having things explode out of them), so why the male scientist didn't give birth to the squid, I'm not sure? Anyway, Black goo + human sex transfer = squid baby.

5. Squid baby turns into hulky, giant squid monster in a matter of hours.

6. Squid monster reproducing with the Engineer results in some form of the Alien, as we all know it...

Kind of an accidental and totally random way of creating the Alien. Which doesn't make any sense at all considering that there is imagery of the Alien (being crucified?) in the mural of the temple. Meaning that this bizarre chain of reproductive events has happened before, which, I don't know, seems to be without logic.

Luckily someone has the alien mural image on Google to prove that I wasn't just hallucinating when they showed it for a second during the film:

http://www.geeksofdoom.com/GoD/img/2012/04/2012-04-04-mural-533x305.jpg

concept006.jpg


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Mark Suszko
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 11, 2012 at 7:14:49 pm

point-by-point:

1. David collects some of the black goo from the shrine room.

2. For, what I have determined to be a completely nonsensical reason, David put the black goo in the scientists water, then gives it to him to drink, in what is an uncharacteristically malicious act of a robot programmed to act a certain way.


-He was told by Weyland, still in stasis, to "try harder". Weyland's entire goal was to join with or be repaired/made immortal by the Engineers. This is an echo of Roy Batty visiting his maker in "Blade Runner" to ask for more life than he was programmed for. Weyland, it is established in the TED talks video is ruthless and will stop at nothing to get what he wants. He has David (favored to be king of Israel and whos House will eventually give us Jesus) built to specification to be able to do things an ethical human would, in his words "find...troubling". David is amoral, and has been ordered to try anything and everything in a hurry to find a "secret of life". He chooses Halloway as the most expendable crew member, though some think it is out of jealousy, since David spent part of the 2-year flight watching Shaw's dreams. The black goo is just an experiment, and one he has to run in secret. David tries sort of, to warn Halloway, by asking Halloway how far he would be willing to go, to find the answers to the Engineers and their tech. This is like the software shrink-wrap agreement everyone checks off without first reading. Halloway, not knowing this is not a casual question, but a specific question being asked by an amoral computer on legs, like a genie with trick wishes to grant, says, casually and fatally: "All the way!"-



3. The infected scientist goes to bone-town with his lady scientist friend, and it is assumed that the black goo infused sperm of the male can get a female human ready to give birth to an alien species within a matter of days.

-This does present some problems. The xenomorph doesn't need a uterus to grow, by the time the Nostromo comes across one. Also, it is well-established Shaw is infertile or otherwise incapable of making a human baby. The growth rate of the squid is highly implausible, along with a lack of obvious side-effects. It makes a "little" more sense if you know that Scott is trying to superimpose a Christ theme over the entire movie, and he needed this stuff to happen to get a "Virgin Birth" happening on "Christmas Day" (why would any of them care about the day otherwise?)-


.

5. Squid baby turns into hulky, giant squid monster in a matter of hours.

-You could assume perhaps that the squid has found something to feed on in the interim, but I agree this is just sloppy short-cutting. It really didn't need to become huge as long as it was FAST, slippery, and agile, like the facehuggers in "Aliens". Or indeed the cobra-worm in the black pools in this movie. There's a theroy out there that the cobra-worms and the black goo are related by competing systems, that the mutagenic goo is actually a spoiled industrial waste product 0f the xenomorph creation process, never intended to be used directly. An example I heard was, if you didn't know what a nuclea reactor was, you could blunder into the containment pool with the fuel in it and get exposed, but it wasn't designed as a facility to expose people like a weapon.... we see in the case where the dead geologist falls into a pool of the goo, it re-animates him and seems to be transforming him into something that looks like an Engineer, only very distorted, and it's not taking well. Then Vickers torches it before it can finish. Maybe that goo is a side project to reverse-engineer the humans into real Engineers, again, to counter the "heresey" . We don't know enough to tell. Maybe in a Director's cut.-



6. Squid monster reproducing with the Engineer results in some form of the Alien, as we all know it...

Kind of an accidental and totally random way of creating the Alien. Which doesn't make any sense at all considering that there is imagery of the Alien (being crucified?) in the mural of the temple. Meaning that this bizarre chain of reproductive events has happened before, which, I don't know, seems to be without logic.


-We know from the horrible third movie I refuse to acknowlege, xenos can combine with dogs and other life forms, and they take on some major characteristics from that. Reverse-engineering that fact from movie cannon, means the squid + Engineer would create a variation different from one that started on human DNA patterns.-



Luckily someone has the alien mural image on Google to prove that I wasn't just hallucinating when they showed it for a second during the film.

-Again, Scott wants to superimpose Christion theological themes over the movie: they set up that the last cave map painting was only about 2 thousand years old... around the time of Christ. Setting up Jesus to have been one of the cabal of Engineers that periodically visited Earth to check progress. Some theorists think the bioweapon production is a reaction to the Engineer emissary being crucified. There is thus repeating imagery of cesaeran sections for "birth" happening here and there.

I choose to go another way and say the picture you refer to in the mural is an echo of DaVinci's Vitruvian Man drawing, part of the documentation for the project they were working on when everything went bad. The reason the mural starts changing is that it is depicting how the xeno form will change now that human DNA is in the chamber to affect it.-






-Regarding Vickers; she is not used well. At first I would have bet she was built like David and not human. Then again, if you were the daugter of a sociopath like Weyland, it might warp you into behaving like that too. Like David, she must obey Weyland against any other feelings. Also like David, she wants to see Weyland die, in her case, so she can move forward to take over his company and etc. I David's case I guess Weyland's death emancipates him from his programming somehow, long as he didn't cause it or by inaction, etc,. etc. Vickers does not approve of Weyland's goal: like the Engineers, she thinks life should follow a natural progression, so children take over from parents. One of the promos leading up tot he movie shows th Yutani corporation tapping into Weyland's vidmail and seeing Shaw present here thesis and plan to go find the engineers. We know later "the company" becomes Weyland-Yutani, a merger. At this point Yutani is more likely a rival company, and maybe they have an interest in disrupting the mission or stealign away any secrets it discovers for themselves. But none of this made the cut of the film. I predict soon there will be college coursde devoted to untangling what this movie actually said and meant.-


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Aindreas Gallagher
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 11, 2012 at 11:45:47 pm

yeah - i'll go with the crucifix another way -

the engineers ritualistically destroy the abomination - they have a historical cultural fear of what the planet seeding device can unleash.

the goo is the engine of panspermia, a panspermia we don't understand. meant to operate in an almost homeopathic concentration of parts per million - but it's rather concentrated, david eyedrop action on a single lifeform, that then attempted to reproduce, that kind of birthing and transgression is a dangerous error. so we played with fire there - or rather our android, acting on the wishes of a dying creator did.

But insofar as the xenomorphs are like, you know, the allegory of grabbing fire - we didn't grab the fire, the engineers did.

we're just their small human offshoots that they care nowt for - And they are more then willing to rip the head off anyone who has the temerity to talk to them.

I *Love* that moment.

It's good scifi this, you can walk through it in your head.

Lindelof is taking way too much stick - his unknowables - walking into rooms and processes, art and technology that makes no sense and prove randomly deadly, I find draws quite a lot from arthur C. Clarke's Rendevous with Rama as much as anything.

the unknowable in this scale of scifi is not a cheap mystery box, it is a necessary logical component of realistically depicting this scale of encounter.

there is plenty of blank strangeness in rendezvous, also plenty of grand guignol horror (remember the sea? the automated machines dismembering the briefly flourishing life forms before rama shuts down?)

structurally there are massive problems in the second act where the characters are bound to variously recall and die in necessary beats from the original series - this is billion dollar commerce like - but altogether I found this at times arresting stuff, and without question hard sci-fi onscreen.

I'm used to dodgy structuring in hard sci-fi is my essential point. it has to walk very difficult channels of dramatic narrative and large questions.

this film unquestionably does that.

We got hard scifi.

more. please.

http://vimeo.com/user1590967/videos http://www.ogallchoir.net promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics


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Kevin Patrick
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 14, 2012 at 5:53:45 pm

My thoughts:

I was OK with the sequence of alien transitions. Guy drinks black goo, girl gets pregnant, girl births alien, alien implants the Engineer. Each time it picks ups some genes along the way.

Did the alien grow or need to grow in a uterus? It didn't before, so maybe it did or didn't this time. I'm not sure it was clear either way.

The alien grew fast. Didn't the first alien grow fast? From little chest buster to "That thing is huge!"

I liked how they explained that what you saw in the first alien was actually an Engineer in a suit. The one sitting in that big telescope thing with his chest bust open. At first, I was concerned that they weren't tying the plot together, since the Engineer had his chest busted in the lifeboat vs. the telescope thing.

But then I realized in Prometheus, they were on LV-223. In both Alien and Aliens they were were on LV-426. So, I'm assuming that will eventually get resolved. Perhaps that's the next stop?

I'm delighted to see (and hear I guess) that there are plans for a sequel. I enjoy good science fiction. But I think good science fiction is really hard to do. It seems kind of rare to see this genre done well. Sunshine was headed in that direction (sort of), until somebody applied a Gaussian Blur to the bad guy. (my apologies if anyone here was in charge of applying that filter)

WMD's, or Engineers? I'm not sure I buy into the WMD theory. I can see how we (or the captain) might see it that way. I saw it as they are the engineers of the universe. They travel around and use their black goo to create new life. Life that adapts to the environments they drop it into. I came away with the feeling that something went wrong with their black goo on LV-223. They got infected and things got out of hand. Only one survived inside the hyper-sleep-chamber-thing. Although, I'm not sure why when he woke up he was so upset and suddenly had to get on with traveling back to Earth. Maybe they did decide they had enough of our in-fighting and hatred of each other and were on their way to put a stop to it. But, that may not mean their cargo was full of WMD's. I still lean towards the idea that they are engineers of life. But they giveth and taketh away. (did I spelleth that right?)

In summary, I liked it. I hope their is more. At least for the sake of continuing the story. Not for the sake of more money. It seems too many sequels follow the money. Not that I blame anyone. It's a business. People pay to see it, whether I care for it or not.

Ridley Scott had done a great job. Twice.

So has Cameron.

Who do you think did a better job (recently)?

Camaron & Avatar?
Scott & Premetheus?


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Tim Wilson
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 14, 2012 at 6:22:18 pm

[Kevin Patrick] "Who do you think did a better job (recently)?

Camaron & Avatar?
Scott & Premetheus?"


Honestly, these weren't my favorites from either of them, so out of these choices, I'm gonna have to go with Cameron and Aliens. LOL



Tim Wilson
Associate Publisher, Editor-in-Chief
Creative COW Magazine
Twitter: timdoubleyou



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Kevin Patrick
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 14, 2012 at 6:48:50 pm

I think I worded my question poorly.

Both Scott and Cameron (speled is wrong the ferst time) have done some great sci-fi. Alien was (in my opinion) outstanding. I'm not sure if I can say ground breaking or not. But it's at least worthy of the argument.

Aliens was also outstanding. For me, it was for several reasons. First, sequels usually are not as good (often times not even close) as the original. Aliens was great. Very impressive. The sequel was as great as the first. The other thing that was impressive (especially in a Scott Cameron comparison) is the fact that Scott didn't write the story or screenplay for Alien. Yet Cameron did both for Aliens.

So, both have done outstanding work in the extremely difficult category of great sci-fi.

The question I was trying to ask was related to how did each of them do with their latest sci-fi works? It's been a long time since both Alien and Aliens. So they've both had a lot of time to think about it and it appears they did think a lot. Although Cameron might get the longest thinker award. Keep in mind Scott Produced and Directed Prometheus, while Cameron wrote, produced and directed Avatar.

So, of the two (since this is about work done recently) which would you say did a better job?

James Cameron and Avatar?
Ridley Scott and Prometheus?

(obviously both do a better job at what they do than I do at asking questions)


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Mark Suszko
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 11, 2012 at 6:12:33 pm

There's some confusion in audience reactions I've read. The film is kept relatively open-ended, and has layers upon layers of Christian symbolism draped over it, which I won't get into just yet. My take on the overall mythos of the film:

The space jockeys, as they used to be called, are called "the Engineers" in the film. My take on them is that they are godlike in their command of biotechnology and almost all their tech is grown rather than built. They rule a considerable fraction of the galaxy, but are alone in terms of sentience. A faction in their society wants to create new sentient life but their government/religion forbids this. Members of the faction go ahead in secret, that's what the opening scene means. Individuals sacrifice themselves on various worlds to seed them with Engineer DNA that melds with what is already there. Over centuries, other members of the faction re-visit the secretly seeded worlds to check on progress and tend their gardens, so to speak. At some point, the promethian heresey is discovered by the rulers, and they order all the experiments found and destroyed, using bioweapons.

The planet our ship Prometheus lands on is a military lab for developing the bioweapon. The project got out of control, and all Engineers on the planet died. Why no others came to check on them is a puzzle: maybe the planet was too secret and was "lost", maybe the xenomorph weapons got out in the galaxy and killed some Engineer worlds and they descended into chaos and won't risk coming near the place. We can only speculate.

This would explain why, when they awaken the surviving space jockey, he goes nuts upon discovering not just mutant engineer offspring, in his lab, but that they have carried the heresy even further by copying themselves in machine form. That's I think why he pops off David's head, and sprints to take off and finish his interrupted mission of killing earthlife...


I like the ending because Shaw is going to take another ship to the Engineers' home world to ask all the unanswered questions, ...with a cargo of xenomorph eggs to use if the doesn't like the answers.


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Tom Sefton
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 12, 2012 at 9:32:16 am

http://cavalorn.livejournal.com/584135.html

Many, many spoilers abound.


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Aindreas Gallagher
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 11, 2012 at 11:09:36 pm

my mate, who is fairly steeped in film and works in it, was very very harsh.

Myself, having watched it six hours ago, I felt there was at least 20 to 30 minutes where I was in a film that Arthur C. Clarke would have nodded along to.

As rendevous with rama laid out - explore at your peril.

I find I adore it a little - there are so many grace moments - tons of structural problems, but dearie me there are a bag of moments and lines..

And it looks utterly incredible. Just astonishing stuff hitting the old eyeballs at times.

http://vimeo.com/user1590967/videos http://www.ogallchoir.net promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics


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Mark Suszko
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 12, 2012 at 2:57:55 am

http://www.whatis101112.com/


More Weyland. He's like an evil version of Robert Palmer, plus Evil Nick Negroponte, (the former head of MIT's Media Lab).


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Scott Roberts
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 12, 2012 at 2:47:33 pm

I think I have two major problems with Prometheus now that I think about it. First, all of the interpretation, with the Christianity subtext and such, is exactly that... interpretation. I'm all for movies being open to interpretation, but not if it's required for it to make sense. That's just a sign of lazy writing. It means you presented a mass of potentially interesting, yet not quite coherent ideas in front of everyone, and told them to fill in the blanks for you with their imaginations. I know, I know... Using our brains and imaginations are good things to do. But when it comes to film, as my preference, I'd rather have a coherent story that has legitimately presented ideas that get answered, that has elements that can be open for interpretation. Like Taxi Driver. Prometheus has little pieces that hint at things, and the audience is asked to finish writing the movie for them. This is also why I hated Tree of Life. (however, to be fair... Tree of Life = boring. Prometheus = suspenseful.)


And my second problem is that there are a TON of little flaws and logical errors throughout the film that just sort of pick away at its overall value. I thought I had a few, but then Red Letter Media released this short video last night (in addition to a new Half in the Bag on Prometheus), covering almost everything I was thinking, plus many more!

[IT DOES HAVE SOME NSFW LANGUAGE, FYI]








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Mark Suszko
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 12, 2012 at 6:42:26 pm

Well I think what I see here is Lindelof is nothing but deferential to Scott, insists basically everything is Scott's and he's just Ridley's Boswell, more or less. But in reality this script is a tug of war between two opposed visions, and like so many bad committee decisions, someone decided that rather than simply choosing between one way or another, and risking upsetting someone important, they thought that blending two disparate visions 50-50 would make everyone equally happy. Like mixing black and white paint should make either artist happy with gray, when it's more like mixing orange and green leaves you stuck with ....mud color. What it did was really muddle things, and not every part of the patients weathered the splicing equally well.It's still fascinating, and I find it entertaining to have to fill in *some* gaps myself... but there's a lot of little things that are annoying.


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Tim Wilson
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 12, 2012 at 6:58:18 pm

[Mark Suszko] "Well I think what I see here is Lindelof is nothing but deferential to Scott, insists basically everything is Scott's and he's just Ridley's Boswell, more or less. But in reality this script is a tug of war between two opposed visions"

I've seen Lindelof say elsewhere that he didn't like how on-the-nose the first version was about it being a prequel. That was one reason the original news about Prometheus was very cagey about whether or not it was a prequel. It was clearly somewhere in the vicinity, but I don't know that they'd settled on the extent to which it was fully an exact, exact prequel.

I can easily see this as what the Star Wars sequel prequels SHOULD have been -- non-stupid, non-boring re-imaginings of the roots of the original trilogy...uhm, let's say "trilogy plus," from an organically different-enough place that they're interesting on their own, and could conceivably lead someplace new and potentially even more fabulous than we've already seen.

That is, not the obvious "Hmmm, I have to figure out how to convince people that this pumpkin-headed blonde brat becomes Darth Freaking Vader." (Short answer: you don't.) Instead, it's more, what's the context for the world we think we know? What are we going to learn from the past that we didn't know already? (Oh right, it's not "The Force," it's bed lice like at The Plaza in New York.)

So while it's organically RELATED to Alien and beyond, it's clearly not intended to be an entirely continuous thread...right? I'm not at all kidding when I say I want to see a sequel to Prometheus. The sequel to this one is clearly NOT the original Alien movie, not even close. Scott, or once again his successors, clearly have an opportunity to turn the crank again.

Heck, let's get Cameron and Fincher to do the next chapters like they did last time. I like both of these guys, and think they've considerably raised their games in the past 20-25 years.

And then we throw in a 4th, like Alien vs. Chucky, or Flavor Flav. Or Summer Glau and we get Joss Whedon to do it.

Tim Wilson
Associate Publisher, Editor-in-Chief
Creative COW Magazine
Twitter: timdoubleyou



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Mark Suszko
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 13, 2012 at 1:32:44 pm

I think it should be a law that SF movie scripts need to be run past Mr. Plinkett for evaluation, before production is approved.


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Tim Wilson
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 13, 2012 at 9:01:08 pm

Random thoughts:

--Other than what's her name's cross, there's no Christian subtext that I saw. "The one who created us" is a chalky looking dude who left his metaphoric splooge in the water. That's not God or Jesus or anything. That's a lame Star Trek movie.

Don't you remember the one? It's where we learn that pretty much EVERY planet was given the same DNA by space dudes, by why of explaining why every member of the federation is more or less an upright biped. It's killing me to forget this. I'm counting on one of you to remind me.

Anyway, if "God made man in his own image" means a space dude blowing up his own head using an animation STOLEN FROM HOUSE, MD, then, well, yeah, I guess it's Christian enough.

Otherwise, it's just a space dude, making no particular vote on God, evolution or Steven Stills.


--By the way, remember the Prometheus from Star Trek V? The one directed by Shatner.

--Promtheus remind anyone of Firefly? Give it 4 engines instead of 2 and we're there.

--One black dude in each movie: Yaphet Kotto was the chief engineer, though, not the pilot as Idris Elba was. However, they have a line that's nearly identical. From 1979: "I hate to bring this up but, uh, this a commercial ship, not a rescue ship... " I was sure enough that this happened that I looked it up. I'd only be paraphrasing Idris, but you get the gist.

--I understand that you have to get your gals into white mummy bikinis at whatever the cost...but they were in stasis TWO YEARS? That's ALL? Why didn't they stay awake? Didn't want to carry that much food? Or toilet paper? Two years!

How long was it the first time? More than two years. In Aliens, it was 50-something years, but the ship had been drifting...but still, that seems like a lot of technology for a two year nap.

--The only reason to cast somebody as young as Guy Pearce is if he's going to end up as his current age after rubbing some of that black age-defying Oil of Olay stuff on.

Otherwise, they could have used any number of bony guys who look like they're 110. Like Keith Richards.


--And what made Guy Pearce think that these aliens could make him young? The scientists had only established there were aliens. Not to be cruder than usual, but human men can spray DNA all over the place, but I can't make anybody younger.

--And wasn't it a stretch to get from "people worshipped this race of really tall people from a solar system a long way from here" to "they created us. My daddy died from Ebola. Boo hoo."

--Oh, and robot alone in space with a movie? Wall-E!! Lawrence of Arabia is kind of cooler than Hello Dolly, but Lawrence of Arabia didn't have any songs.

--Decapitated officious robot with his head in a bag? C3PO.

--Oozing white goo while he talks? Lance Henrikson.

--And did he not sound EXACTLY like HAL sometimes?

--I know that Independence Day isn't the only movie where a plucky little ship rams a bigger one, but I still thought of it.

--Charlize getting mashed by alien spaceship chunks was inevitable, but did she really not notice that she could have stepped sideways? Because THAT would have been funny: run run run, realize hey, I only need to step sideways...and she does...WHEW!...and she hears a noise, looks up, and a space anvil drops on her head. Awesome! Classic Roadrunner stuff.

It was gorgeous. I'm really glad I saw it in 3D on a bright screen. I still want a sequel. Scott has TWELVE future productions listed at IMDb, and I'll be there for all of them.

But wow. I laughed at a lot of this for the wrong reasons.

Tim Wilson
Associate Publisher, Editor-in-Chief
Creative COW Magazine
Twitter: timdoubleyou



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Mark Suszko
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 14, 2012 at 2:02:27 am

Tim, you were thinking of "The Chase" episode of STNG:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chase_(Star_Trek:_The_Next_Generation)

But there's also a similar, older reference in TOS:

"The Paradise Syndrome", When Kirk gets a bump on the noggin and goes "native".

http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Preservers

Both explain why aliens in the Trekverse are humanoids with different noses, ears, and foreheads.



I think David studies Lawrence of Arabia because Weyland refers to it and obviously is impressed by it.


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Scott Roberts
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 14, 2012 at 2:07:08 pm

[Mark Suszko] "I think David studies Lawrence of Arabia because Weyland refers to it and obviously is impressed by it."

Weyland should have been played by Peter O'Toole...! MISSED OPPORTUNITY.


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Tim Wilson
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 14, 2012 at 4:50:14 pm

[Scott Roberts] "Weyland should have been played by Peter O'Toole...! MISSED OPPORTUNITY"

GENIUS. Would have been amazing.

Tim Wilson
Associate Publisher, Editor-in-Chief
Creative COW Magazine
Twitter: timdoubleyou



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Joseph Owens
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 17, 2012 at 10:00:15 pm

[Tim Wilson] "] "Weyland should have been played by Peter O'Toole."

But it would have given the skeptics even more grist... "hey! isn't that the guy from Lawrence of Arabia?!?!?" WTF? This movie sucks, and then slurred Obama, and then moved on to the weather. (Its a "Wilde"ism.)

That kind of thing. But the movie is tons of fun. Saw it in 3D IMAX -- our gift from Canada to the rest of the world. You're welcome. I've been waiting since 1979 for this, longer than two years in stasis, that's for sure. My thesis for the dead, chest-bursted space jockey/engineer on LV422 or whatever it is in the original, is that he's probably the crashed remains of the team sent to figure out WTF happened but the spawned xenomorph we see at the end of Prometheus gets them. Its a bit tough, but I can't really see why they don't rent a bunch of Predator-guys to go in. They seem to enjoy the work. But I'm interested to see if the tie-in might be explored at all, and just as interesting to know that the Predator species are chest-bursters themselves. Oh, its all so complicated.

Anyway, alternately I kind of see the Engineers as the Tleilaxu of the DUNE universe, and stuff goes wrong for them, too.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bene_Tleilax

Christmas movie, but one my wife won't enjoy, even though "Die Hard" remains one of her very favourite flicks, probably just because Alan Rickman is in it. Before he was Snape.

jPo

"I always pass on free advice -- its never of any use to me" Oscar Wilde.


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Tim Wilson
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 17, 2012 at 11:13:53 pm

She like Die Hard for Christmas because it's an awesome Christmas movie. Fave of my wife and mine too.

There's actually a thread way back in this forum on unusual Christmas movies. Lethal Weapon, and a bunch of others i can't Renner at the moment....although it included probably my #2, also starring Bruce Willis, Red.

Hey, and thanks for the IMAX 3D. Much appreciated. When I drop by again for Spiderman, I'll do something Canadian, like be much more polite than usual.

Tim Wilson
Associate Publisher, Editor-in-Chief
Creative COW Magazine
Twitter: timdoubleyou



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Mark Suszko
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread
on Jun 17, 2012 at 11:21:02 pm

Or drink your milk out of a bag, and say "zed" instead of "Z".


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Mike Cohen
Re: Prometheus "Already Seen It" thread on DVD
on Dec 2, 2012 at 4:52:07 pm

Late to the party here due to a busy Summer.

We watched this on Blu-Ray Redbox, which of course means no extras.

Ignoring the above discussion, here are my thoughts:

The guy playing Weyland looked like a bad makeup experiment. Why not hire an actual old actor and add less makeup, unless they plan to use the young actor in other films?

The spaceship seemed too advanced for only being 80 years from the present. While most of us will not be around in 2090, I'm pretty sure technology will not advance that quickly. Of course if it does, then some of us might be around to see it.

Even without the Alien connection it would have made for enjoyable sci-fi, something missing from most attempts these days. There is so much emphasis on shock horror that current attempts don't spend enough time on the sci- part of it.

Great sets and production design, costumes, and many nods to the original films with the flame throwers, vehicles and cast of characters.

Why did the cave paintings depict the star system of RU-486? Didn't the Engineers know how to find their way home? I don't think they were making an invitation for their human offspring to the planet in the movie. It did not appear the engineers were parked in their ship for 35,000 years. A bit confusing there.

I agree with the others that the Alien xenomorph does not need a womb to grow, although maybe the squid version does.

Once Shaw gets into the surgery pod, things get a little goofy. She injects herself with morphine or whatever but the surgery pod does not provide anesthesia? Seems like maybe they needed to do some beta testing before rolling it into production. Then those robotic tools go to work using a laser to cut into her abdomen. I realize it's a movie but there is muscle and other layers to cut through in there. Then that shiny pincers goes in and removes the squid baby - looked a lot like the robot that delivered Luke and Leia on Polis Massa. Then it simply staples her closed and she is up and running around immediately. I know this is one of those details that does not need to be shown to move the story along and it makes for good suspense - just saying.

Although Shaw is clearly a bit weak for the rest of the movie.

I liked the details of the ship, the escape pods, landing gear etc - any time you show a large spaceship that can actually touch down on a planet rather than being just a hunk of metal in space is good for me.

The depiction of the control room with the telescope chair thingy was one of those moments that really should have been exciting to see. I wish they had kept the fact that it was a prequel somehow from becoming public. I found myself the whole movie waiting for the big reveal.

My wife did not know it was a prequel and at the very end asked if I thought the creature looked like the one from Aliens. So I experience theses moments surreptitiously through her.

I applaud Ridley Scott for returning to his sci-fi roots.

Mike Cohen


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