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Recommendations For First HD Project in Vegas Pro

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Jim Prisby
Recommendations For First HD Project in Vegas Pro
on Jul 19, 2014 at 10:57:19 pm

Although I've worked in and created Vegas Pro projects in SD for a number of years I'm now going to be creating my first HD Project and would appreciate recommendations for the questions I have.

1. I will be scanning pages and creating a video slideshow from the four yearbooks of my high school years for our 50th high school reunion coming up in a few months. Naturally, The video will be created on a Blue-ray disc for viewing on an HD TV. What HD Project setting should I use, 1920x1080-24p or is there a better one?

2. The photos in these yearbooks are low quality B&W so I want to scan them in a high resolution and use pan, scan and zoom techniques. What should that resolution be...double the 1920, about 4000px, or something else?

3. I have some old 8mm silent movies from high school that I want to videotape while showing on a white board and add them to the video slideshow. I don't have an HD video camera so I will have to borrow or rent one to do this. Should I be sure to get a video camera with settings that match the exact project settings discussed above, especially the fps?

4. For my SD projects I always displayed the video on an external 14" standard TV set calibrated with my Spyder3TV software/hardware to make the necessary final color and brightness adjustments in Vegas Pro. Since this new project will be in HD can't I just do the final color and brightness adjustments on my 23", 1920x1080 external monitor that I use for my Vegas Pro editing and calibrated with my Spyder2Pro software/hardware and not have to use an external HD TV set to do that?

I would appreciate any other general information you can share for my project.

Thanks so much,
Jim

Intel 2.67GHz Core2 Quad CPU.
8 GB RAM
NVIDIA GForce GTX 570 superclocked
Windows 7 64bit


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Stephen Mann
Re: Recommendations For First HD Project in Vegas Pro
on Jul 20, 2014 at 4:08:37 am

In general, shoot and edit in the highest resolution that your hardware will support. Only resize the output when you encode for the disc.

Steve Mann
MannMade Digital Video
http://www.mmdv.com


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Bob Peterson
Re: Recommendations For First HD Project in Vegas Pro
on Jul 20, 2014 at 6:01:32 pm

For photos or scans, I usually set the resolution to twice the video resolution to allow for some zooming. You should probably figure out how much you will be zooming in, and set the scan or photo resolution accordingly.

For 8mm movies, you will need one of two things. A projector with a variable speed control, or a video camera that can be adjusted to match the projector's speed. You will need one of these capabilities to keep the image from rolling when captured by the video camera.


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Jim Prisby
Re: Recommendations For First HD Project in Vegas Pro
on Jul 22, 2014 at 12:41:28 am

Thanks to those who at least responded a little. I'm still hoping to get an answer to question 4.

Intel 2.67GHz Core2 Quad CPU.
8 GB RAM
NVIDIA GForce GTX 570 superclocked
Windows 7 64bit


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Stephen Mann
Re: Recommendations For First HD Project in Vegas Pro
on Jul 22, 2014 at 2:57:18 am

No LCD monitor is capable of accurately representing colors. White depends on the color of the backlight and black is an illusion because an "off" pixel is not really opaque. (Ever look at a "black" screen in the dark?) Pro LED BackLight LCD Monitors replace the CFL backlight with three LED's per pixel (consumer LED backlights replace the CFL with one RGB LED matrix to backlight a block of LCD pixels). This solves the two main reasons that you cannot correctly calibrate any LCD display that has a CFL (Cold Fluorescent) backlight. With an LED backlight, you can at least get closer to black and white pixels.

An LCD TV makes a lousy monitor for color purposes. It's a TV first and full of compromises to make TV shows look better. The computer input is a convenience to replace the photo album on the coffee table. If you think that using a TV as a reference monitor is good enough for delivery to a TV, have you ever noticed the variations between TV's on the wall at Best Buy even when showing the same program?

A consumer LCD monitor calibrated with a spectrophotometer (like the ColorMunki) is quite sufficient for web and even DVD delivery.

The bottom line is that you should always deliver the most accurate colors that your setup can afford, and let the end viewer adjust their TV's if they don't like the colors. Don't start the process with an unknown calibration in a consumer HDTV.

Steve Mann
MannMade Digital Video
http://www.mmdv.com


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Jim Prisby
Re: Recommendations For First HD Project in Vegas Pro
on Jul 24, 2014 at 3:23:33 am

Steve,
As I mentioned in my original post, I use Spyder calibration hardware on both my LCD monitor and my SDTV, I believe this will result in an improvement over a monitor and TV not calibrated. I can't afford to purchase a professional calibration monitor. I guess my question was if I use the Spyder calibration hardware on both my LCD monitor and an HDTV which would be best to use for display for color correction in Sony Vegas?

Jim

Intel 2.67GHz Core2 Quad CPU.
8 GB RAM
NVIDIA GForce GTX 570 superclocked
Windows 7 64bit


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Stephen Mann
Re: Recommendations For First HD Project in Vegas Pro
on Jul 24, 2014 at 4:56:19 am

It depends on the technology. In consumer TV's, Plasma has the best color rendition. LCD displays with a CFL backlight are the worst. OLED is the pinnacle for correct color control, but the yield is still low for large-screens. Some "LED" backlight monitors only have a ring of white LED's replacing the CFLs, but they are marginally better than CFL's. A pro LED monitor will have an LED behind every pixel, and comes close to what you can get from an OLED display.

In general, a consumer TV is a poor reference monitor.

Unless you are delivering product to a cable TV or broadcast destination, your viewers simply cannot tell the difference.

Steve Mann
MannMade Digital Video
http://www.mmdv.com


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