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Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.

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Andrew Morales
Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 5, 2011 at 3:39:04 am

Hi I'm working with my T.V. Production students and we don't have enough money to purchase 26 pin SDI cables but would standard 10 pin cables do the same job?


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Chuck Pullen
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 5, 2011 at 1:26:22 pm

I think you are going to need to give some more info Andrew. Cameras, cables, length, application, etc... and you'll get some good answers.

Chuck


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Andrew Morales
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 5, 2011 at 8:04:45 pm

The studio cameras are Sony DXC-M7 and the control boxes are CCU-M7. The control boxes have both 10 and 26 pin inputs and the cameras have both 10 and 26 pin outputs. From what I have researched the 10 pin cables cost significantly less and supply power to the camera and video from.

Hope this helps!


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Tim Ward
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 5, 2011 at 8:45:33 pm

The M7 is 26-pin only. The "10-pin" connector you refer to is probably the 8-pin Remote connector used for the RM-7 remote control panel, or paint box. For studio use (connecting to a CCU), you need the 26-pin (CCZ) cables. These cameras are analog, so you don't need the "digital"-labeled cables, unless they're cheaper.

There may be an alternative that uses the RM-7 instead of the CCU, bundled with a coax cable for genlock, a 4-pin XLR cable for power, a 3-pin XLR cable for beltpack-intercom, another coax cable for a teleprompter, and yet another coax cable for the camera's composite video output, a 2-conductor cable that drives the add-on tally light that you'll have to purchase/build to put on the camera (since you can't use the built-in light)...I may have left out one or two others, but it's a mess and the cost savings may not be that great compared to just purchasing 26-pin CCZ cables, which you might be able to find in good shape on eBay.


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Andrew Morales
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 5, 2011 at 9:41:57 pm





Both have 10 pin inputs!!! I shouldn't have to buy CCZ cables!


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Tim Ward
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 5, 2011 at 10:26:42 pm

Sorry about the confusion Andrew...I read the wrong thing regarding the RM-7 - it IS a 10-pin connector (not 8-pin), as I just verified with one in my hand. That connector you highlight is for the RM-7, NOT for connecting the camera to the CCU. My above post is correct, except the 8/10-pin part.


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Tim Ward
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 5, 2011 at 10:33:01 pm

I forgot to add that the RM-7 can be used directly with the DXC-M7 or to extend the CCU-M7's controls to another location, such as a camera shader's position.


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Andrew Morales
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 5, 2011 at 10:39:57 pm

But, the camera cannot connect to the CCU via 10 pin is what you are saying. Is that correct?


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Tim Ward
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 5, 2011 at 10:44:11 pm

[Andrew Morales] "But, the camera cannot connect to the CCU via 10 pin is what you are saying. Is that correct?
"


Yes, correct. It's only used to connect to an outboard device like the RM-7.


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Andrew Morales
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 5, 2011 at 11:09:27 pm

Ok. Could you tell me if there is a place where I could find some type of connection for a 4-pin XLR DC cable? Where one end goes into a wall outlet and the other into the camera.


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Tim Ward
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 6, 2011 at 1:12:04 am

[Andrew Morales] "Ok. Could you tell me if there is a place where I could find some type of connection for a 4-pin XLR DC cable? Where one end goes into a wall outlet and the other into the camera."

You have to use a DC power supply designed for this type of equipment. You won't really find them cheaper than this one.

Forgive me, but from your posts above, it would seem you are inexperienced in working with studio cameras. If you don't already have RM-M7 paintboxes for each camera, it would be way cheaper to just buy the 26-pin cable. If you DO have them, I'd advise you to enlist/hire someone's services with expertise in studio design to help you with this project (local TV station engineer, perhaps).

My bottom-line advice for using these cameras is to get someone to help you and be prepared to spend a little money for cabling. I'm saying this as nicely as I can so maybe you won't feel the "wrath" of Bob Zelin if he stops by here. :)

Now...there may be another solution altogether. Please describe (as much detail as possible) where you are (location/school/local-access), what facilities you have, what you're trying to accomplish and teach, and what kind of budget you have to work with.


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Andrew Rendell
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 5, 2011 at 1:32:55 pm

It's not really an answerable question without knowing which pieces of equipment these cables are going to connect and what functionality you're expecting to have.

I don't know if this is of use to you http://www.uweb.ucsb.edu/~shahnam/CLSPEC.pdf


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Chuck Pullen
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 6, 2011 at 2:37:55 pm

You may want to check into a device called "PhatCat" by Laird. It used to be available from Markertek, but I don't see it anywhere on their site/catalog. It essentially replaced the 26 pin cable with a piece of coax I believe. If you only need short pieces, it may be easier to get the 26 pin.

Why don't you check some used equipment people about getting the cable, as it's not used much anymore, so there should be lots of it floating around. Depending on where you are in the country, try to find someone like U.S. Broadcast: http://www.usbroadcast.com They have a warehouse full of old video gear and may have some 26 pin for sale.

Chuck


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Tim Ward
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 6, 2011 at 3:10:06 pm

[Chuck Pullen] "You may want to check into a device called "PhatCat" by Laird. "

Totally forgot about PhatCat! It uses Cat-5 cable. But a Google search
shows the pricing is unfortunately similar to a new 100ft 26-pin cable. Yeah, I agree the used dealer path is the way to go.


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Chuck Pullen
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 6, 2011 at 3:27:15 pm

[Tim Ward] "Totally forgot about PhatCat! It uses Cat-5 cable"

That's right it's Cat-5 Cable not Coax. I guess that explains why Markertek is selling Laird Cat-5 cable and not the actual transmitters/receivers...classic.

I do see 26 pin cables pop up on E-bay from time to time, but I've met enough equipment salvagers to know there are mounds of the stuff sitting in warehouses all over the country, he just needs to find them.


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Richard Crowley
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 6, 2011 at 3:19:53 pm

As the other people here have already stated, the ONLY connection between the camera and the CCU is the 26-pin connector. And 26-pin camera cable is frightfully expensive. However there are at least two ways around that problem.

1) Sony has TWO major camera interface cable standards, the 26-pin kind like you have, and the 14-pin variety. There are adapters that allow use of 14-pin cable on 26-pin cameras (and vice-versa). Your cameras will operate on 14-pin cable.

The bottom line is that the camera only needs a few basic things to operate: DC power; the video from the camera to the CCU, the video from the CCU to the camera (gen-lock and viewfinder), and the remote-control command signal (1 wire). All the other wires are extra features that you may or may not need. For example intercom (which most people ignore in favor of 3rd party systems like ClearCom, et.al.) And separate RGB video for high-end encoding, chroma-key, video for teleprompters, etc. etc.

2) In many parts of the world, there is a massive sea-change from old-school analog Standard Definition equipment to digital High Definition. This has made all the old equipment, (including the cables) surplus ("redundant"). You have not told us where you are, so we don't know whether this is happening where you are or whether you could take advantage of that phenomenon. It is likely that the kinds of cables you need are sitting in dark corners of surplus dealers and recyclers waiting to be melted down for a few dollars of copper content. That is, the cables that haven't already been buried in land-fills across the globe. I myself have a few hundred feet of 14-pin cable that I would give you for free, and even re-wire for 26-pin (if we can still find the connectors).

If you lived in my area (Portland, OR) I would help you with your cameras. Perhaps there are retired broadcast engineers in your location who could help not only get things connected, but who would know where surplus camera cable is languishing. And other standard-definition equipment like monitors and even switchers, etc. I just discarded a perfectly good (but obsolete) Sony monitor this week.

Note that there is nothing magic about power for CCUs or cameras. A good-quality DC power supply is the same whatever it is operating. I have used 12-volt wall-warts from Radio Shack and put 4-pin XLRs on them. The only reason Bescor can get away with charging $130 for a 4A 12V supply is because that is what broadcast people are accustomed to paying. Cameras in particular are designed to operate properly on a range of voltages (to support battery operation, or over 100s of feet of camera cable, etc.)


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Tim Ward
Re: Difference between 10 pin camera cable and 26 pin.
on Apr 6, 2011 at 3:58:46 pm

Nice post, Richard.


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