FORUMS: list search recent posts

how do you guy's manage this.

COW Forums : Broadcasting

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
maurice jansen
how do you guy's manage this.
on Jun 18, 2009 at 8:03:32 pm

hi there

just a simpel pain in the &*$# in every day work.

i guess you all face these problems. people leaving file's everywhere on the system. non-labeled DVD's and Reels everywhere in the VTRarea. how hard can it be to put a version number or a description in your file name. i guess increment and save is evented for this. how hard is it to put a date and a project number on a tape and cover. why do tape's start at 01.34.12.22 and how hard is it to push this red slider on a mastertape.

sorry had too much of these things to day. ;-)

how do you guy's feed up your editor's / vt's

greet
Maurice



Return to posts index

Mark Suszko
Re: how do you guy's manage this.
on Jun 18, 2009 at 9:01:42 pm

Guilty.

Well, just to survive, I'm getting better a little bit each project on the computer side, I give maningful names to files that relate to something, not just alphanumeric glop, then I increment and/or add date or version info.

But I still leave stuff like imported sound files or graphics on the desktop while immediately working on a particular related edit, until the thing is mastered, then I bundle everything away into proper folders and put the folders on the right drives where they should have been all along. I probably should just create the folders in the scratch drive int he first place, what can I say, I'm at the same time detail-oriented but not highly organized. :-) Every time I don't do it right, I punish myself when the media gets disconnected from the project, so eventually the pain will train me anyway.



More guilty on the tape labeling thing. I don't always get the chance to stick a label on a tape in run and gun situations, so if I have something to write with (I keep losing pens) I'll write on the tape cassette itself, with a grease pencil or sharpie, meaning to go back and label it nicely later. But "later" is always bumped for some other immediate emergency, it seems. Really, this is a matter of personal discipline, and I should just buckle down more. I've been getting a *little* better, but under time pressure I fall back on old bad habits, from the times the tape formats were large as telephone directories and you could use them for end tables.

So, Maurice, I apologize to you in effigy on behalf of your own staff. We are flawed beings.

If you don't want to get into the same old arguments with them, try positive reinforcement, praise them when you catch them doing good, keep plenty of labels and pens everywhere around the shop, and maybe thigns will geta little better over time. Positive reinforcement.


Return to posts index

maurice jansen
Re: how do you guy's manage this.
on Jun 18, 2009 at 9:37:32 pm

;-D

at least you honest.
we have a physical rack where all editor's dump there data-dvd's tape's and stuff.
we try to archive this stuff every week but when it get's more busy we end up doing it once a month.
the time pressure generate's more bad labeled stuff. so that's twice the pain.
next to that we try to cleanup local drive's after every job but for some reason file's and up in folders/directories where nobody will ever look in.
not even talking about people realy p&*^&* off that i deleted a Comp1.mov file in a plugin directory of photoshop. ???????

greet
Maurice


Return to posts index


Mark Suszko
Re: how do you guy's manage this.
on Jun 18, 2009 at 10:11:35 pm

In the plug-ins folder? Even I'm not THAT sloppy.

Perhaps you need to implement some access restrictions, if there's a way to grant a mix of privaleges, you narrow the area where they can go astray and make it one big cattle chute, so to speak. How to implement such a thing is beyond me, I'm afraid.

What about this: each day, one person on a rotating basis is tasked with cleaning up after EVERYBODY, not just themselves, before they can clock out. Schedule them from 4 to 5 to do nothing but library/cleanup, and make it clear that no matter how little there is to do on a particular day, ONLY that task will be done for that hour. And there is no trading days, every man and woman has to take a turn. Different person each night. This is not a technological fix, but a behavioral one, which is why it stands a chance of working - it counts on human nature. It works similarly to having every member of a family have to wash the dishes one night a week, no matter what. It should work it's magic in about a week or less, but tempers will flare for a couple of days until everybody synchronizes naturally. Ride it out and remain calm.

When you implement this, make the rules really really simple: the cleanup guy sets the file browser for "organized by date", and only puts away anything with today's date, which the computer automatically lists first on top. Anything else on the desktop not supposed to be there and not made today, goes in the trash.

On the physical cleanup side, each shooter gets one box and everything they need for the week, they keep in that one box. If they are out of the office, and someone else has to access one of their tapes, they at least have only one place to look.

Have one bin for the day's newly shot tapes and finished masters, etc.... anything that is ready for the library.... each shooter takes a turn per day to collect and label or re-label whatever has found its way to the library box.

If you can get them to do this for a month, everybody who is still alive and ambulatory will start to harmonize and standardize, and without a lot of rules. But it needs full management support, and you can't let the system get interrupted or evaded by anyone, or it immediately breaks down again into anarchy. That's what I've experienced.

Final step: you come over to my shop and do all this, I need it BAD:-)

Tape libraries without a dedicated tape librarian are REALLY hard to keep organized. It's drudgery that nobody wants to do, and the sucker that gets the duty never gets any kind of positive reinforcement or reward for doing it, indeed, all they get is further behind of their "real" work, so staying motivated is really difficult. If you can get any kind of full-time one-job librarian, even if they are an intern or retired senior citizen or something, just the fact that there is one consistent person in charge and dedicated to the task full-time works wonders. When they have little shelving to do, have them work on burning backups to DVD or a hard drive, or something.

The central library is also very fragile: like Tinkerbell, it dies if you all stop believing in it. To whit; shooter "Joe" decides he doesn't trust the library, and starts keeping "his" tapes at his desk. Now when "Joe" is out of the office and somebody needs to dig up so-and-so shot right away, they have to search TWO places: the shelf in the library where it belongs, and the desk drawer in Joe's office where it IS. Oh, and you have to know before you start the hunt, if that stuff was shot by Joe, Eunice, Harry, or Frank. When one of those folks gets fed up looking for Joe's tape, guess what THEY start to do? Yep, soon, you have squirrel piles of tapes all over the place. I'm in the middle of trying to tame just such a problem in our shop, for the eleventh time in fifteen years or so: I've been assigned and fired from Librarian duty more times than I can recall, and always, it came down to these factors:

-Everybody loves the idea of the library, but they don't stick to procedures and protocols for more than a month, because they can get away with it. Responsibility without authority means irrelevancy for the assigned librarian.

-Once the library falls behind, it's every man for himself again, and you get squirrel piles. Exponentially-expanding squirrel piles.

-If you assign someone to library duty, they need the hours for that to be regular and consistent. Since library is low priority, it and maintenancne down-time are classically the first things to get bumped off the daily and weekly schedules for *any* other priority. Once that happens, getting back on the horse gets ever harder.

-The bigger the mess and the longer you let it fester, the more intimidating and disheartening it becomes.

-Reward with positive reinforcement when the shooters behave properly. Keep the labeling supplies, pens and labels, holding bins, ridiculously ample and ubiquitous, make note publically every so often of people who are keeping things neat. This works better than beating on the slobs, which just makes us, I mean THEM THEM!, sullen and disheartened.

And be PATIENT. Wear them down with your Patience.


Return to posts index

Bob Zelin
Re: how do you guy's manage this.
on Jun 19, 2009 at 3:41:55 am

Maurice -
tapes and DVD's ! this is nothing. I am now involved in shared storage systems, and what about multiple editors not labeling their files on a shared drive volume. And then it gets screwed up (because no one labels anything) - and then I GET BLAMED ! I am seeing this more and more, and had quite a heated confrontation with a big client of mine, where I felt they were getting very intolerant of my "abusive tone" about my scolding them on not properly labeling their files, and enforcing their freelance editors to do the same.

Hey, does anyone know where file 01110011001.mov is ?

This is becomming a very difficult situation, and one that is rapidly increasing, as we all switch over to tapeless workflow.

Bob Zelin




Return to posts index

maurice jansen
Re: how do you guy's manage this.
on Jun 21, 2009 at 1:36:36 pm

wise words fellows

i guess your san is the trashbin the editor's always dreamed off! never full, you don't have to emptý it some body else does and when somthing is gone blame the other guy.

a archive/library is indeed very fragile. and i guess it become's more fragile when more people use it. must there be a some sort of old wise gatekeeper that give's you the files/tape's you want and
become's the devil when you don't return it.

our editing-facility is a part of a biger facility doing all kind's of stuff. till now all the editing and archiving was done on the same location. all the people knew each other and we actually still can find old B-format tape's in our archive in split second. not talking about reanimating the old BCN ;-)

but as the company grow's there is a need to have a editsuite on a remote location. as there is no budget for a big datapipeline between the both, i run in trouble with the exchange of material. of coarse FTP/Yousendit is nice for a delivery format but what about ruff material. it now travels by a internal posting system on harddisk. not very efficient.

i guess it's true about the tapeless domain. you never make a copy by mistake on tapelevel. throwing away a tape is something unnatural you alway's think when you do this. tapeless has alot alot of good side's but archiving needs so much more disaplin.

greet
Maurice


Return to posts index


Mike Cohen
Re: how do you guy's manage this.
on Jun 22, 2009 at 6:54:00 pm

here's a handy little tool I use daily:
http://www.bulkrenameutility.co.uk/Main_Intro.php

Since digital files tend to have names like DSC10023456789.mov or whatever, before I import anything into an editing app, I rename files in some easy to follow manner, that makes it easier to find files later. Inevitably files will get misplaced. We are human and have brains that occasionally forget to do things.

As for tapes, it is every man for himself here. Cardboard boxes for finished projects help. In progress projects, you keep your tapes rubber banded together on a shelf, away from trash cans.

Write down, on paper, the location of projects (drive name, computer) or in a Word or Excel doc.

That being said, there are some files like logos that live on the desktop. It is important to copy such files to your project directory before importing into the project.

I tend to label my field tapes Date_#, knowing that I can add more details later if I want to, but that there is (almost) never more than one shoot on a given date. I just have to remember the shoot date. 90% of the time, we capture the tapes within a week of the shoot, and then barring any hard drive failures, that is the last time you touch the tapes.

Always room for improvement.

Mike Cohen


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]