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EduTVTech
High School Football Games
on Sep 8, 2005 at 3:58:17 pm

Hello.

I work for a school district and we just started recording our high school football games. Among the many things to learn, I'm looking for help on how to adjust for the lighting. We use three AJ-D410AP DVCPro Cameras. At the moment with our switcher, it's just a the camera signal. No genlock.

The game starts out in daylight and as it gets darker the stadium lights are turned on.

Is there anyway I set the white balance without having to adjust it every 15 minutes? Different filters? Any ideas would be helpful.

Thanks.


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Matte
Re: High School Football Games
on Sep 8, 2005 at 7:32:45 pm

If you're goiung to "Double-post", I guess I can "Double-reply".

[EduTVTech] "Is there anyway I set the white balance without having to adjust it every 15 minutes?"

Nope.
In "real" football coverage, there are live engineers operating with full remote-control over all the aspects of the cameras.
They "shade" the cameras iris and black-levels constantly, and can manually compensate of color-balance.

In more "basic" productions without these benefits, you can:

A. leave cameras in "auto-WB" (not so good)
B. ignore WB (worse)
C. regularly, carefully re-WB all cameras during breaks in the game (best you can do).


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Jake Abramson
Re: High School Football Games
on Sep 9, 2005 at 12:03:16 am

Have each camera op keep a white card near by. When you go to a break, have each point at the card, do a quick auto-white for all and continue on.


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glenn chan
Re: High School Football Games
on Sep 12, 2005 at 2:27:11 am

If you have post-production time, you could just apply a color correction filter and globally adjust all cameras that way.

Most color correction filters in editing programs can be keyframed. Otherwise just dissolve between different settings.

2- If the camera operators keep a white card nearby, they should have the same color of light landing on the card. And this should be consistent with the light landing on the field.

Or maybe there's something on the field or near the field that is white, and that the camera operators can fill the camera frame with.


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Dave LaRonde
Re: High School Football Games
on Sep 12, 2005 at 4:39:16 pm

Color correction in post production makes sense, and I certainly agree with that. But globally? Nope, there's too much room for error for it to be of any use, in my opinion.

To make a global color correction assumes that every camera operator will re-white-balance at the same time, under the same lighting conditions, with the same models of camera... and all those cameras are set up the same way. That's a big bunch of assumptions to make, and that invites trouble.


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Charlie King
Re: High School Football Games
on Sep 13, 2005 at 3:24:33 pm

I agree, Dave.

Charlie


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glenn chan
Re: High School Football Games
on Sep 18, 2005 at 5:33:15 am

Sorry, to clarify:

What I was suggesting was this:
At the beginning of the game, all cameras manually white balance to the same thing. Then they don't touch white balance at all for the rest of the game.

In post, you apply color correction globally (i.e. to a nested project/sequence). This should counteract for the drift in white balance as the football game's lighting situation changes.

Wouldn't that work?


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Matte
Re: High School Football Games
on Sep 18, 2005 at 2:10:33 pm

[glenn chan] "In post, you apply color correction globally (i.e. to a nested project/sequence). This should counteract for the drift in white balance as the football game's lighting situation changes.

Wouldn't that work?"


I MIGHT, but it is so unlikely that ANY two (or more, same model or not) isolated cameras will visually "match" at any one time with just a simple white balance that the discussion gets convoluted.

There are going to be many differences in the image from each camera some more pronounced than others.

The iris level (which will CONSTANTLY be running in and out of "too high or too low" with most "small CDD" camcorders) can affect the appearance and the adjustments needed in the Color Correction (CC).
The Black Balance as well as the distinct areas for each camera of "slightly different" lighting will affect the initial WB and subsequent "darkening sky and mixing-in of artificial light" coloration.

So, a "blanket" CC just MIGHT be OK if you aren't too picky, but I doubt it will work very well.


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Mike Cohen
Re: High School Football Games
on Sep 27, 2005 at 9:31:20 pm

The default white balance setting (OFF) on the AB switch tends to be pretty good on the panasonic cameras - it uses the factory setting based upon what filter you are on. Or you could go out to the field the night before and set your A and B WB settings based upon say dusk and night with lights on. Since you start off in daylight, you can also use daylight filter A and B - the filter wheel and WB AB switch talk to each other. You may be able to figure out a set of settings which works - so at the appropriate times of day, you can tell your operators "Switch to filter 1, setting A." Might take some trial and error, but since only one camera is hot at a time, switching the settings somewhat seamlessly may be possible.


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