FORUMS: list search recent posts

5 minute video onto a DVD

COW Forums : Compression Techniques

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Matt Lewis
5 minute video onto a DVD
on Jun 15, 2009 at 2:25:02 pm

Hi,

I have a five minute video that I want to put onto a standard DVD. It's a 1080 60i video and the uncompressed .mov file is 4.15 GB. I'm using Compressor and I'm not terribly happy with the quality of the 'Best Quality 90 min DVD' compression. It seems like, since it's only 5 minutes, there's a lot of room for improved quality. I'm a compressor/compression novice, though, so I don't know what settings to tweak to get there.

Thanks.


Return to posts index

Chris Blair
Re: 5 minute video onto a DVD
on Jun 17, 2009 at 1:29:33 am

What are the quality problems you're seeing? I don't use compressor so others could better answer compressor specific issues, but from all that I've read on the forum, Compressor is sort of a swiss army knife of compression...doing a lot of things moderately well, but none really well.

The first thing I'd suspect is you're seeing artifacting from resizing from HD to SD...or perhaps there are field issues since you state you shot 1080 60i.

Give us some additional information about the compression settings and what specific quality issues you're seeing.

Chris Blair
Magnetic Image, Inc.
Evansville, IN
http://www.videomi.com


Return to posts index

Brian Alexander
Re: 5 minute video onto a DVD
on Jun 19, 2009 at 5:36:41 am

[Chris Blair] "Compressor is sort of a swiss army knife of compression...doing a lot of things moderately well, but none really well. "

Chris, how can you make a statement like that if you don't use Compressor? What about the optical flow technology that is built into Compressor but can only be activated if you know what buttons to push? That's like me saying that PC's are kind of like the swiss army knife of computing...doing a lot of things moderately well, but none really well; while this may or may not be true, I'm sure someone would disagree.

Back to business...

Matt, remember that DVD is basically 1 resolution no matter what your source material is: 720 x 480. (We could argue that 720 x 480 16:9 is Anamorphic and the alternative is to lay the material down at letterboxed 720 x 404 but we'll leave this for discussion at a later time.) The point is that your 1920 x 1080 material is being resized.

For a better looking product, I would suggest resizing your footage before creating your MPEG2 file. Your best bet is to use ProRes as your intermediate codec. It will assure a fast (but large file size) workflow.

Drop your Job (source) in your batch window ->
Apply a ProRes for Interlaced material Preset on to your Job (search in the text box if you can't see it) ->
Highlight your Job Settings in the Batch Window (if it's not already highlighted) ->
Select the Frame Controls Pane in your Inspector Window (3rd button from the left) ->
Turn Frame controls on if it's not on already (if everything is greyed out you need to click the button to the right of the Frame Controls drop-down box and select "On" when the drop-down becomes active) ->
Select the Geometry Pane in your Inspector Window (5th button from the left) ->
Set your frame size to 720 x 480 and make sure that the Pixel Aspect is set to NTSC CCIR 601/DV ->

Now the new correctly sized ProRes file that you're about to create should be the source for your DVD encoding.

If you want to get really fancy then just apply a couple more steps: bear with me here...

Make sure that your Job Settings are highlighted in your Batch Window ->
Click Job on the Menu at the top of your screen ->
Select New Job with Target Output ->

This will create a new Chained job based on the output from your last job! You should be seeing a chain link in your preview and as your icon for the new job, right?

Now find your DVD Best Settings folder and drag the folder to the new Chained Job ->
Before submitting you can change the name of your new DVD output files; I would suggest you erase the settings name applied for the audio and video files. When creating your DVD the Audio and Video name need to exactly match such as: MyMovie.ac3 and MyMove.m2v

Click SUBMIT!

This should get you on your way. If you've made it through these steps you're halfway to becoming a Compressor Expert.

Let us know how this turns out.
Thanks.


Return to posts index


Daniel Low
Re: 5 minute video onto a DVD
on Jun 19, 2009 at 12:57:08 pm

Excellent post!

__________________________________________________________________
Two years from now, spam will be solved. - Bill Gates, World Economic Forum 2004


Return to posts index

Chris Blair
Re: 5 minute video onto a DVD
on Jun 20, 2009 at 1:22:53 am

Brian...you left out a key phrase from my original post:

but from all that I've read on the forum, Compressor is sort of a swiss army knife of compression...doing a lot of things moderately well, but none really well

You can find post after post across Creative Cow where other people have noted that Compressor can't be considered a high-end encoding and transcoding app. So there are a legion of people that pretty agree with that assessment. The point to the post was:

1. We need more info.

and

2. Compressor is likely going to require a specific workflow to create a clean, high-quality encode.

I also pointed out his quality issues were likely from resizing the file upon export to MPG2, which you acknowledge in your post as well.

For the life of me I don't understand the antagonistic attitude that resides on these forums, nor the allegiance to particular platforms and applications. There are a half-a-dozen things that could be causing his quality issues and without additional information, it's nearly impossible to determine what exactly is going on.

Chris Blair
Magnetic Image, Inc.
Evansville, IN
http://www.videomi.com


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]