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After Effects export codec settings "Uncompressed 8-bit" too big

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Chris Smith
After Effects export codec settings "Uncompressed 8-bit" too big
on Jun 20, 2018 at 12:16:56 pm

Hi guys,

I have a problem when exporting video H.264 with video format codec "Uncompressed 8-bit", it's way too big comparing to codec "Animation". The differences are 10x with the same video.
Please help!!!

Thanks in advance.


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Walter Soyka
Re: After Effects export codec settings "Uncompressed 8-bit" too big
on Jun 21, 2018 at 4:54:04 am

Uncompressed video files are always very large; as the name implies, there is no compression whatsoever applied to the video stream.

You can't make uncompressed video smaller, but you can choose a different format that allows compression and reduces file size. What is it exactly that you're trying to do?

Walter Soyka
Designer & Mad Scientist at Keen Live [link]
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
@keenlive [twitter]   |   RenderBreak [blog]   |   Profile [LinkedIn]


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Chris Smith
Re: After Effects export codec settings "Uncompressed 8-bit" too big
on Jun 21, 2018 at 2:15:14 pm

Thanks Walter for a quick answer.

Yeah I get way smaller size when I put "Animation" codec settings, but I wanted smaller size in "Uncompressed 8-bit" because my coworker get size like 10x smaller in this settings.
Can it be some Mac or PC differences for Adobe?
Because I don't know how he get that small sizes in "Uncompressed 8-bit".

Thanks in advance.


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Walter Soyka
Re: After Effects export codec settings "Uncompressed 8-bit" too big
on Jun 22, 2018 at 4:20:42 pm

[Chris Smith] "Yeah I get way smaller size when I put "Animation" codec settings, but I wanted smaller size in "Uncompressed 8-bit" because my coworker get size like 10x smaller in this settings. Can it be some Mac or PC differences for Adobe? Because I don't know how he get that small sizes in "Uncompressed 8-bit"."

There are three things that affect the size of uncompressed video: the raster size, the frame rate, and the pixel format. There is no way to affect the size of uncompressed video, other than changing the characteristics of the video itself. If you're getting a 10x difference, you must be comparing similar files.

You also mentioned H.264 in your original post. H.264 is usually highly compressed. If Uncompressed is one end of the spectrum, H.264 is the other... so it sounds like there's some confusion here. Let's back up. What is it that you're trying to accomplish?

Walter Soyka
Designer & Mad Scientist at Keen Live [link]
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
@keenlive [twitter]   |   RenderBreak [blog]   |   Profile [LinkedIn]


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Steve Bentley
Re: After Effects export codec settings "Uncompressed 8-bit" too big
on Jun 22, 2018 at 7:17:34 pm

Keep in mind too, the Animation codec is run length encoded - the file looks at all the pixels and any that repeat in color go in a table, so in effect all the pixels of one color only take up one slot of memory, instead of the many hundreds of pixels that share that color. Its amazing how small an Animation codec file can be compared to its uncompressed sibling. But don't consider the Animation codec compressed. While it is compressed in the size, its not loosing any information when its displayed (hence its called lossless).
When displayed or used in a comp there is zero difference between an Animation-Best codec and an Uncompressed codec



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Walter Soyka
Re: After Effects export codec settings "Uncompressed 8-bit" too big
on Jun 22, 2018 at 8:33:12 pm

[Steve Bentley] "When displayed or used in a comp there is zero difference between an Animation-Best codec and an Uncompressed codec"

There can be subtle differences between Animation and Uncompressed.

Animation is RGB and cannot be chroma subsampled, while Uncompressed is Y'CbCr, and usually with 4:2:2 chroma subsampling. That means that they can represent different colors (some 8-bit RGB colors cannot be represented in 8-bit Y'CbCr and vice versa), and of course the chroma subsampling introduces artifacts (especially in edges which can have a noticeable effect on compositing).

Walter Soyka
Designer & Mad Scientist at Keen Live [link]
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
@keenlive [twitter]   |   RenderBreak [blog]   |   Profile [LinkedIn]


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